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Jon Eckels
11-07-2006, 10:22 PM
During a recent visit to the loo, I pondered a relatively simple question that made me curious. What were the most important things that man has created?

Now some would say things like fire, but man didn't create fire, man created ways to utilize it. Some would say things like TV, but modern technology sits on the shoulders of millions of crucial inventions, some far more crucial than others to have put us where we are today.

Now an obvious one would be the wheel. maybe gunpowder. I personally think the spring is a particularly critical invention.

So like I said, simple question, I was just curious what others could think of.

Jim Becker
11-07-2006, 10:41 PM
If I wanted to be fasicious, I'd say, latté... :D :D

But my real answer is...language.

skip coyne
11-07-2006, 10:43 PM
During a recent visit to the loo


indoor plumbing would be right up there in my book ;)

Rob Russell
11-07-2006, 10:46 PM
If I wanted to be fasicious, I'd say, latté... :D :D

But my real answer is...language.

Jim,

I'd argue that man didn't create language, because there is hard scientific evidence that animals have languages of their own. IMO it would be fair to say that man took language to another level.


I'd also say that writing and the ability to permanently capture information is our most significant invention.

Rob

Jim Becker
11-07-2006, 11:08 PM
Good point, Rob. I seem to have forgotten that our two birds communicate with us quite clearly with sounds, words (really) and gestures....but then again, man is also an animal! I wonder if "complex language" would be more appropriate, although we really don't know what the depth and complexity of communication in the animal world really is... ;)

But you are right...writing is quite significant in all respects.

Gary Herrmann
11-07-2006, 11:12 PM
I'd have to agree with Rob. The permanency of the written word has allowed one generation or group to build on the accomplishments of the previous.





But beer and chocolate are right up there too...

Mark Stutz
11-07-2006, 11:18 PM
The Thermos.


Why, you ask?:confused: Because it keeps hot things hot, and cold things cold!




















The real mystery is......How does it know?:eek: :D :D






I realize this was a serious question, and I will need to ponder a while as well...but I just couldn't resist.

Mark

John Schreiber
11-08-2006, 2:17 AM
I wonder if "complex language" would be more appropriate I've given this some thought myself and I think it is abstract communication. Animals can certainly communicate, but humans can talk about something that is not present. We can even talk about things that have never existed. Right here on the Creek, we often give each other ideas about how to solve problems that we haven't directly experienced.

Any time you feel stupid, imagine just how wonderful humans are that we can do things like that. Or imagine how different the world would be if we couldn't.


On a different level, the basic "machines" that they teach us about in high school are just amazing. One of my favorites is so basic it doesn't get any recognition - momentum. Think of how much more force you have when you swing a hammer instead of trying to push a nail into a board with a hammer. The guy (or gal) who figured that out probably moved humanity further forward than any other. Inclined planes, wedges, levers, wheels, pulleys, hydraulics - they are all great, but momentum was probably the first.

Deep thoughts.:rolleyes:

Joe Tonich
11-08-2006, 7:40 AM
Awww maaannnnn.............ya gotta ponder in the 'loo????????

I thought it was used for readin the comics n' sports section...:eek:


Guess I's have to say the coffee cup.....THATS the most important thing I use all day. Matter of fact....I'm usin it right now. ;) :D

Jeffrey Makiel
11-08-2006, 8:02 AM
The most important thing that man has created was himself through years of evolution which has separated himself from the beast.

However, when watching the nightly news, one may easily argue my point of view.

-Jeff :)

Russ Filtz
11-08-2006, 8:18 AM
The idea of making tools to make other tools, such as the wheel!

Plus, you can't say "POND"ering around here anymore! :D I think the correct term must now be creekering. :rolleyes:

Rennie Heuer
11-08-2006, 8:42 AM
I vote for the inclined plane. Whitout it, there would be no woodworking. No saws, no chisels, no planes.....

Robert Mickley
11-08-2006, 9:34 AM
The Thermos

Mark

Beat me to it! :D But I agree thsi will take some creekering

Mark Singer
11-08-2006, 9:39 AM
"Just one word" "Plastics"


From "The Graduate"

: Mr. McGuire: I just want to say one word to you -just one word.
: : Ben: Yes sir.
: : Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
: : Ben: Yes I am.
: : Mr. McGuire: 'Plastics.'
: : Ben: Exactly how do you mean?
: : Mr. McGuire: There's a great future in plastics. Think about it. Will you think about it?
: : Ben: Yes I will.
: : Mr. McGuire: Shh! Enough said. That's a deal.

Mitchell Andrus
11-08-2006, 9:39 AM
Refridgeration
Specialized education
Vaccines
Pin-up girls
Steel
Long distance communication
The clock
Glue
Plastics
Energy storage

Mitch

Andy Hoyt
11-08-2006, 9:50 AM
My first thought was electricity.

Immediately followed by the yin and yang of credit and debt.

Art Mulder
11-08-2006, 10:50 AM
Now some would say things like fire, but man didn't create fire, man created ways to utilize it. Some would say things like TV, but modern technology sits on the shoulders of millions of crucial inventions,


I'd argue that man didn't create language, because there is hard scientific evidence that animals have languages of their own. IMO it would be fair to say that man took language to another level.

There are a lot of "inventions" that probably could be categorized as "discoveries". Like Jon said, we didn't create fire, but developed wayse to utilize it. Ditto electricity.

But it is a tough one to differentiate the two in some cases. Is the spring an invention (coiled up thin metal = springy action = comfortable chairs and beds and millions of uses in motors and gizmos) or just an implementation or utilization (Hmm these tree branches are springy and bounce back, I wonder if we can do that with something stronger and more resilient?)

But Rob really kind of kailed it with "writing". We truly are standing on the shoulders of giants, with current knowledge building on previous knowledge, and without writing to pass on and record our knowledge...

...art

ps: just the other week I read that the invention of sliced bread (as in "the greatest thing since sliced bread") actually took quite a while to catch on.

Jon Eckels
11-08-2006, 12:16 PM
ps: just the other week I read that the invention of sliced bread (as in "the greatest thing since sliced bread") actually took quite a while to catch on.

Well of course it did. What could they possibly say bread was the greatest thing since? ;)

Lee DeRaud
11-08-2006, 3:21 PM
The pneumatic brad nailer: without it, there would be no 'New Yankee Workshop'. :p

Bill Lewis
11-08-2006, 3:49 PM
the airplane

Rennie Heuer
11-08-2006, 4:17 PM
The pneumatic brad nailer: without it, there would be no 'New Yankee Workshop'. :p

With all due respect, that honor would have to go to the router. ;)

Andrew Ault
11-08-2006, 6:53 PM
Cold India Pale Ale after working in the sun for a few hours.

Cheers!

- Andy

Neil Clemmons
11-09-2006, 12:35 AM
There was an article in Forbes earlier this year on the 20 most important tools of all time. The article is here if you are interested - some will surprise you. Warning that their definition of 'tools' is a bit different than ours -

http://www.forbes.com/2006/03/14/technology-tools-history_cx_de_06toolsland.html

Neil

David Rose
11-09-2006, 1:28 AM
Well, maybe man didn't create anything... on his own. I have no doubt that we have thought of many ways to use/misuse everything. :D :eek: :(

David


During a recent visit to the loo, I pondered a relatively simple question that made me curious. What were the most important things that man has created?

Now some would say things like fire, but man didn't create fire, man created ways to utilize it. Some would say things like TV, but modern technology sits on the shoulders of millions of crucial inventions, some far more crucial than others to have put us where we are today.

Now an obvious one would be the wheel. maybe gunpowder. I personally think the spring is a particularly critical invention.

So like I said, simple question, I was just curious what others could think of.

Russ Filtz
11-10-2006, 8:24 AM
The simple lever. Without it, we'd have no prybars or cats paws to remove nails!

Tim Morton
11-10-2006, 6:51 PM
Cold India Pale Ale after working in the sun for a few hours.

Cheers!

- Andy

My vote was going to be for the ice cold stovepipe porter I am sipping on right now after a hard week which ended with my daughter totaling her car by hitting an embankement going fast enough to pop the airbags...yesterday when it happened I was just glad she did not get hurt.....tonight I am thinking about how nice it was that she had a free car from her grandmother and how the next car won't be so FREE:mad:

Reed Wells
11-11-2006, 8:56 PM
Come on guys! Everyone that owns a shop knows the greatest invention is the cordless drill. I forgot where the screwdrivers are stored. LoL

Steve Ash
11-11-2006, 9:35 PM
Nope...you are all wrong...Agriculture, and if you disagree don't do so with your mouth full.

Where would man be if he couldn't provide food for his family? No need for language, you couldn't be taught in the amount of time it would take for your body to give up from malnourishment.

Although Agriculture does provide barley and hops for the Ale that was mentioned is as close as anyone got to being right.


just my .02

Curt Fuller
11-11-2006, 10:23 PM
Nope...you are all wrong...Agriculture, and if you disagree don't do so with your mouth full.

Where would man be if he couldn't provide food for his family? No need for language, you couldn't be taught in the amount of time it would take for your body to give up from malnourishment.

Although Agriculture does provide barley and hops for the Ale that was mentioned is as close as anyone got to being right.


just my .02

I've got to agree with Steve on this one. Nothing works right or well or as it's supposed to when your stomach is growling. But sit down to a nice ham and swiss with a cold beer to wash it down and the world is right again.

Another one that I think would have to rank right up there near the top is language. Or communication! Look at how the world moves ahead when people are talking and how it screeches to a halt and even backtracks when they start bowing their necks and refuse to communicate.

Ben Grunow
11-12-2006, 11:31 PM
As stated above the written word has got to be the most valuable with vodka and gasoline taking close 2nd and 3rd.

Frank Fusco
11-13-2006, 8:25 AM
If I wanted to be fasicious, I'd say, latté... :D :D

But my real answer is...language.

Man didn't invent that. It was given at the beginning.

The most important invention in the history of mankind is..................................the mute button on the TV controller. :rolleyes:

Art Mulder
11-13-2006, 10:22 AM
.........the mute button on the TV controller.


Floss.



Stir Fry.



And digital watches.

Brett Baldwin
11-13-2006, 2:47 PM
I'm going to go with the rest that said the written word. I think we developed reasoning which is the fundamental basis of all invention but as far as the most important thing we've done with that reasoning, writing really has to be at the peak.

But right behind it is the beer (of whatever flavor) that lubricates the mental machinery.;)

Paul Engle
11-17-2006, 12:19 PM
Gotta be written language, with out it word of mouth becomes full of errororsorsss or " Walk like an Egyptian" :D :D hyragliphics Ha! ( sp) miss written word.

Al Willits
11-17-2006, 12:26 PM
Lots of good stuff named, but as a older more sensitive person, I'd go with soft toilet paper...

:)

Al....and maybe electricity

John Shuk
11-17-2006, 8:31 PM
Indoor plumbing.

John Hart
11-17-2006, 10:02 PM
The Arch.

It may not be the most significant...but it's my favorite

Mark Stutz
11-17-2006, 10:53 PM
The Arch.

It may not be the most significant...but it's my favorite


John, a lot of people in and around St. Louis would agree with you!

Andy Hoyt
11-17-2006, 10:55 PM
John, a lot of people in and around St. Louis would agree with you! Hmm. I thought he was talking about all those golden ones.

Have you seen this guy eat? Scary!