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Don Farr
08-01-2003, 9:25 AM
I have never taken the time to put a ceiling in my shop. It currently is just rafters (on 16" centers) with insulation stapled in between. I need to do something before winter. Any suggestions on an easy and inexpensive material for this? The shop is 20' x 40' with 10' high rafters. The walls are 1/2 " plywood. I almost always have to do these projects by myself, so large sheets are a concern.

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 10:23 AM
I have never taken the time to put a ceiling in my shop. It currently is just rafters (on 16" centers) with insulation stapled in between. I need to do something before winter. Any suggestions on an easy and inexpensive material for this? The shop is 20' x 40' with 10' high rafters. The walls are 1/2 " plywood. I almost always have to do these projects by myself, so large sheets are a concern.

In order to provide proper fire protection, I'd suggest you use drywall--you already have a problem with the exposed insulation unless it's foil-faced and even then it's better covered.

Lifting the sheets are not a problem...just rent a lift from your friendly local rental establishment. I did that when I finished the basement in my previous home and it made the work darn easy! It was worth every penny of the cost, which amounted to the equivalent of a few sheets of drywall. It also means your "helper" (and you should have one if at all possible) doesn't have to be a big, strong person. It also eliminates the needs to use stilts or a bench when putting in the fasteners...one short step ladder or an overturned bucket will be all you need.

Steve Clardy
08-01-2003, 11:04 AM
I'm planning on using tin sheets. My shop is 40x64, and drywall is out. I'll just add a few nailers between the trusses and hang 3x12 sheets of roofing tin. Then have 12-18 inches of insulation blown in. Thats the plan, but when it comes about for sure I do not know. Steve

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 11:07 AM
I'm planning on using tin sheets.

Have you considered the noise factor with a material like tin? The thin, hard sheets will reflect sound like no tomorrow!

Steve Clardy
08-01-2003, 11:18 AM
Have you considered the noise factor with a material like tin? The thin, hard sheets will reflect sound like no tomorrow!

Have not thought about that Jim, but thats basically what I have now. The roof tin is exposed, [have about 1/3 covered with 1 1/2 styrofoam], and planning on finishing that. Then the tin on the trusses, with blown in insulation. Shouldn't be any more than what it is, which I don't notice now.
I've been in two building with this setup and really didn't notice any more sound. Though I have put up with loud noises all my life, working on tractor trailers rigs, [yes, I'm from arkansas originally, they call them rigs, ha], and machinery of all kinds. Never worked in a quiet place I guess. Steve

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 11:26 AM
The difference will be both the angle(s) and distance you will be from that surface. The tin on the roof is at multiple angles to you and has a different reflectivity than it will when it's a flat surface just a few feet above your head. Personally, I'd still use drywall for this particular application, for it's denser properties, better fire resistance and easier accomodation of your shop lighting INTO the ceiling. This is a great opportunity to get away from any surface mounted lighting you may have--it reduces the "whacking the lights" factor considerably and since you can more easily difuse the light, provide for more even illumination in your shop. (I'd also consider moving any horizontal DC ducting above the rafters for the same reason) You have a great opportunity here, although only you can determine what is best for your particular shop!

Steve Clardy
08-01-2003, 11:37 AM
The difference will be both the angle(s) and distance you will be from that surface. The tin on the roof is at multiple angles to you and has a different reflectivity than it will when it's a flat surface just a few feet above your head. Personally, I'd still use drywall for this particular application, for it's denser properties, better fire resistance and easier accomodation of your shop lighting INTO the ceiling. This is a great opportunity to get away from any surface mounted lighting you may have--it reduces the "whacking the lights" factor considerably and since you can more easily difuse the light, provide for more even illumination in your shop. (I'd also consider moving any horizontal DC ducting above the rafters for the same reason) You have a great opportunity here, although only you can determine what is best for your particular shop!

So no moving them or concealing them. Also I have no dust pipe to contend with as all my runs are in concrete floor. [Have lots of extra inlets so if I have to move something]. Due to my truss situtation, [whoever built the shop did not know what they were doing] I have them almost all rebraced, but really do not want the weight of sheet rock helping pull them down. The weight difference from a 4x12 sheet of drywall to a sheet of 3x12 tin is a lot. So that determines a lot in why I think I should go with tin, even though I may get some more noise reflection.
Steve, [not an engineer, but think I am sometimes!! ha]

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 11:40 AM
Good point about the weight. Homasote might also be a choice...it's lighter than DW and a good sound control. But your idea to use the tin has a lot of merit given the circumstances with the trusses!

We expect pictures of the new ceiling when it is done! :D

Steve Clardy
08-01-2003, 11:47 AM
Good point about the weight. Homasote might also be a choice...it's lighter than DW and a good sound control. But your idea to use the tin has a lot of merit given the circumstances with the trusses!

We expect pictures of the new ceiling when it is done! :D

Also have considered what they call Duckboard, alum. foil on one side, white foil on the other, but only comes in 4x8 sheets that I can find. Also its around 18.00 sheet, ouch. But that would mean adding more wood for nailers, just like drywall. With tin, it will span farther with less nailer material.
What is this Homasote?

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 11:56 AM
Also have considered what they call Duckboard, alum. foil on one side, white foil on the other, but only comes in 4x8 sheets that I can find. Also its around 18.00 sheet, ouch. But that would mean adding more wood for nailers, just like drywall. With tin, it will span farther with less nailer material.

I'm not familiar with this material, but be sure it's rated to be "exposed". If it's foil-faced foam insulation board/sheathing, it needs to be covered to meet fire code.


What is this Homasote?

Homasote is a product that's been around for a long time--it used to be used a lot for wall and ceiling coverings in lieu of drywall or plaster. It's a low-density fiberboard product, usually grey in color, and comes in 4' x 8" sheets. The 'Depot carries it, although I don't remember the price. The surface is lightly textured which helps with sound reflectivity and paints well. I have it around my DC closet presently. Unfortunately, you'd have the same issue with this product as the others with your rafter spacing. Trust me, I understand, as our home is older and things are not exactly space on even 16" centers!

(Norm used to use a sheet to protect his workbench on NYW during glue-ups, etc)

Steve Clardy
08-01-2003, 12:10 PM
So where codes are it would have to be coveredthen I guess. It's 1/2" thick with R rating of thirteen, thats the best part. Great stuff. Mainly used on outer walls in buildings before the sheet tin goes on, and the roof.
The only codes we have here [ way out in the boonies] are sewer codes, which even do not apply to me. Less than 3 acres, you have to have a $7500.00 turd pumper system. I have 31 acres on this place, so just septic tanks with laterial lines.
But I do not want anymore fire risk, so I guess the duckboard thinking is out now, due to fire risk and cost. Back to tin looks like.
Understand the stud spacing in old houses. Ours is framed in oak, studs are full size 2x4, spaced wherever they though it was a good place to put them. 12-18" spacing. Not good when we were pulling beadboard and installing sheetrock. Real pain in the gazoo. Ha. Gotta get some work done on cabs today. Later, Steve

Jim Becker
08-01-2003, 2:04 PM
Yea, the problem with the insulation board you are calling "duckboard" is that if it ignites, it gives off extremely poisonous fumes...that's why it needs to be covered.

Yes, today is cabinet day here, too...I'm pre-finishing the interior surfaces of my upper cabinets "as we speak" with PRL. Wouldn't you know that the humidity would ramp up again to day, but so far, no problems. I want to get these things assembled by the end of Sunday so I can get cracking on the face frames, doors and 14 drawers I need to make. (I need to space freed up to do that!)