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Lee Schierer
08-12-2018, 11:02 PM
I've come to the point in life where my knees won't take much crawling around on the floor. My recent partial knee replacement has made the situation worse. I still want to be able to do work around the house and other work that requires some kneeling. I'm looking for a set of knee pads. I see good reviews on the No Cry pads from Amazon, but there are some negatives too regarding durability.
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I also see decent reviews on the Rigid Pro hinge stabilizing knee pads from home depot, but complaints as well about durability and comfort.
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Any other suggestions?

Tom Stenzel
08-13-2018, 1:28 AM
Hi Lee,

When I still had two knees I had problems with knee pads staying in position when I moved. I started putting down those interlocking foam squares to kneel/sit on. They work well if you're not moving around much and provide some insulation when working on a cold driveway. Now that I only have one knee the foam squares still work well for me.

-Tom

Doug Dawson
08-13-2018, 1:36 AM
I've come to the point in life where my knees won't take much crawling around on the floor. My recent partial knee replacement has made the situation worse. I still want to be able to do work around the house and other work that requires some kneeling. I'm looking for a set of knee pads. I see good reviews on the No Cry pads from Amazon, but there are some negatives too regarding durability.

I also see decent reviews on the Rigid Pro hinge stabilizing knee pads from home depot, but complaints as well about durability and comfort.

Any other suggestions?

The most important feature of a knee pad is how easy it is to put it on and take it off. Some of them are rather infernal in this respect (and I think I have them all.) Your choice on that (my favorites are on a job site right now so I can't comment on what they are.)

Another issue is what they would be in contact with. I find that those advanced "gel pads" that people use to stand on in kitchens are immensely useful to knee down on, and significantly diminish the difference between whatever knee pads happen to be on hand. A noodle (like you would see in a swimming pool) might do in a pinch, and those are really cheap.

David Bassett
08-13-2018, 2:28 AM
The most important feature of a knee pad is how easy it is to put it on and take it off. ...

I'm not sure that's the *MOST* important. I think how the pads distribute pressure on your knees tops my list. (I've had pads that are excruciating. They just hurt differently than the floor.) Another thing I've found key is how the pads rest on the floor. One pair I had was great in exactly one position, but awful to actually use. Every time I leaned left or right I fell off an edge and it twisted my knee. Just a couple more things to consider.

Doug Dawson
08-13-2018, 2:35 AM
I'm not sure that's the *MOST* important.

It is if your knees are as bad as mine are, where the central question is, can I even _do_ this? If it's too much trouble to put the pad on, I'm _not_gonna_do_it_. It controls your life. So there. ;^)

Clint Baxter
08-13-2018, 6:43 AM
I prefer to use a cushioned pad from Lee Valley when I’m kneeling in an area, but when I’m moving around a lot and need a pad, I use these. https://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/clc-g361. I tend to use just the bottom strap so they don’t cut as much into the back of your leg.

Clint

Paul F Franklin
08-13-2018, 9:00 AM
I have three or four different sets and am not completely happy with any of them. But I can offer a few general observations.

The pads with a thick flat front are comfortable of kneeling for a long time in the same place, but the flat front will tend to catch and roll the pad on any surface that isn't hard and smooth. For example, they aren't good on any type of carpet.

The types with two straps take longer to put on but seem to stay in place better. I prefer Velcro straps to snap or buckle straps.

I doubt durability will be an issue if you are not a pro using them all day every day.

The interlocking foam tiles mentioned by another poster are very useful if you are not doing a lot of up and down and moving around a lot. I use two or three of them so if I am moving along a wall, say, I can leapfrog one from behind me to in front of me.

Jamie Buxton
08-13-2018, 9:42 AM
For me, the big problem with standard knee pads is that they slide down my legs when I stand up. A better solution is pants with a pad pocket in front of the knee. Carhartt, Duluth, Dickies, and many others make pants like this.

Charlie Hinton
08-13-2018, 9:51 AM
I have had several different sets over the years, the comfortable ones wouldn't stay in place.
Some of the uncomfortable ones wouldn't stay in place.
This is what I have now, not especially comfortable but if you crisscross the straps they stay in place.
If I am going to be crawling around I put them on.
https://www.google.com/shopping/product/4194523800405425557?q=knee+pads+for+work&start=40&safe=off&client=safari&sa=N&hl=en-us&biw=1024&bih=649&tbs=vw:l,ss:44&prmd=sivn&prds=epd:6394837077236155854,paur:ClkAsKraX5qxAWzy 99VLiUfeCxv7zTlDu8kxIOBWpoSc405xHOaONQ-vkeKTI87bZNbnvsU5QGwhfaDAC5tvkG6yTcL3ASbwTFWxBNZDm hywFVJqr7vDZV_QMxIZAFPVH73jkGuH-ScYlHAdHqgpeIY4EhcFrA,cdl:1,cs:1&ved=0ahUKEwjL3-zHlOrcAhVrwlQKHXjFCyI4KBCBNgigBA

Jerome Stanek
08-13-2018, 11:19 AM
I have 3 or 4 different ones the ones I like best are the sports pads

Jim Becker
08-13-2018, 12:44 PM
The things with most knee pads that I've always not liked was the thickness and hard edges. I find that uncomfortable. Personally, my goal would be for something thin with a material that does the job without the extra structure...

Doug Dawson
08-13-2018, 1:19 PM
I prefer to use a cushioned pad from Lee Valley when Iím kneeling in an area, but when Iím moving around a lot and need a pad, I use these. https://www.acmetools.com/shop/tools/clc-g361. I tend to use just the bottom strap so they donít cut as much into the back of your leg.


Of all the pads I have, those are the ones I hate the most. They are _the_ most annoying to put on if you have arthritis in your hands as well as your knees.

Jim Koepke
08-13-2018, 1:44 PM
In my time a few pairs of pads have worn out.

Recently due to free shipping (ends today but orders over a certain amount may be free shipping) my plan is to try pants with a knee pocket as part of the design:

https://www.dickies.com/pants/painters-double-knee-utility-pants/2053.html?dwvar_2053_color=NT#start=2

My new pants have not yet been given a test drive. They are likely better than my knee pads that always fall down when standing up or walking. Besides this way the user gets to choose the padding.

jtk

Jim Becker
08-13-2018, 3:03 PM
Duluth Trading also has some very durable paints with provisions for knee pads. If I was in the trades, I'd be all over those given how much stuff I've bought from them over the years!

Doug Dawson
08-13-2018, 4:09 PM
In my time a few pairs of pads have worn out.

Recently due to free shipping (ends today but orders over a certain amount may be free shipping) my plan is to try pants with a knee pocket as part of the design:

https://www.dickies.com/pants/painters-double-knee-utility-pants/2053.html?dwvar_2053_color=NT#start=2

Those are also available on amazon, twenty bucks a pop. I just ordered a few.

The only problem is, they are long pants, and only suitable for the cooler weather. Currently it's hot here, and the appropriate attire for the shop is a loincloth (protect your bits from flying chips.)

Mark Blatter
08-13-2018, 4:58 PM
I actually have the 'No Cry' pads and they work better than most. They are comfortable wearing them for long hours. I use them installing fixtures where we put in 10 - 12 hour days. The only issue I have with them is one, just one, won't stay in place. The other one never moves around though so go figure. I have several other pair that work OK too, but I have no idea on the brand. I think the No Cry were about $20 through the Big Gorilla, Amazon.

All of the make you sweat a great deal. Once they have been on for 3 - 4 hours my knees are soaked.

Good Luck.

Jerome Stanek
08-13-2018, 6:17 PM
I actually have the 'No Cry' pads and they work better than most. They are comfortable wearing them for long hours. I use them installing fixtures where we put in 10 - 12 hour days. The only issue I have with them is one, just one, won't stay in place. The other one never moves around though so go figure. I have several other pair that work OK too, but I have no idea on the brand. I think the No Cry were about $20 through the Big Gorilla, Amazon.

All of the make you sweat a great deal. Once they have been on for 3 - 4 hours my knees are soaked.

Good Luck.

What kind of fixture do you install. I installed fixtures for Revco and CVS drug stores and know how much time you are on your knees.

Michael Pyron
08-13-2018, 7:48 PM
I feel for you...been a carpenter for over 30 years and at some point recently I had to inform myself at what a moron I am for having not worn knee pads since the beginning.

anyway, long story short, the following are the best I've found for real day in day out use: https://www.lowes.com/pd/AWP-HP-Non-Marring-Foam-Cap-Knee-Pads/1000177327

they tend to stay on fairly well and not slide down your legs like most all others do, they are very comfortable and do the job...I pretty much wear them ANY time I anticipate being on my knees, even if for a moment or two.

Bruce Wrenn
08-13-2018, 10:02 PM
Being in a business that requires crawling under houses, I have a pair of "hard shells for that. Inside, I use a "gel " pair. Don't ever think about using ones from under house on interior floors, unless you want to buy customer a new floor. Embedded dirt will scratch the heck out of a floor. DAMHIK. Having replacement knees (5+ years now) it's more important to figure how I getting back up, BEFORE getting own on my knees. Those foam kneeling pads are handy, along with PLUSH carpet samples, which usually can be had for free. Everybody should keep a carpet square in their car for changing a tire.

John Terefenko
08-13-2018, 10:24 PM
I've come to the point in life where my knees won't take much crawling around on the floor. My recent partial knee replacement has made the situation worse. I still want to be able to do work around the house and other work that requires some kneeling. I'm looking for a set of knee pads. I see good reviews on the No Cry pads from Amazon, but there are some negatives too regarding durability.
391409
I also see decent reviews on the Rigid Pro hinge stabilizing knee pads from home depot, but complaints as well about durability and comfort.
391410
Any other suggestions?


I was told that even with a partial knee replacement they do not want you to kneel on your knee. Have you been told otherwise??

Mark Blatter
08-14-2018, 12:46 AM
What kind of fixture do you install. I installed fixtures for Revco and CVS drug stores and know how much time you are on your knees.

I've done some small farmers market type stores in the past, but recently I have been doing cell phone stores. Starts with a plain box space and 2 days later it is ready to be filled with product. Lots of wall system pieces that mean 3-4 hours on my knees. The No Cry ones do work well for those installs. The floors are all luxury vinyl tile, so no worries about scratching them up.

Lee Schierer
08-14-2018, 7:39 AM
I was told that even with a partial knee replacement they do not want you to kneel on your knee. Have you been told otherwise??

My surgeon says it is okay to kneel. The problem normally is the pain associated with kneeling.

Mike Null
08-14-2018, 9:08 AM
Now that getting up is such a chore I don't kneel any more but I found a foam type garden pad about 9" x 18" x 1.5" the most comfortable for me.

Rich Enders
08-14-2018, 7:11 PM
Barwalt Tool, (www.barwalt.com, a supplier to the tile industry) has a new knee pad with a single strap. I tried them. They are working well for me, and they are probably the lightest I have ever used. The trade name is Megalight. Rich Enders

Tom M King
08-14-2018, 7:18 PM
I have bought a number of different types over the years, but my most comfortable ones were the first ones I ever owned (still here). They're leather, with thick felt padding. Those only have one "belt", which goes below the knee. Even with the ones that have straps both above, and below the knee, I only use the one below the knee, and even cut the top straps off some.

edited to add: I found them on Amazon, but I think they cost a lot less 40 years ago, when I bought mine.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00C44OVRI/ref=psdc_553612_t1_B00G95010E

Steve Rozmiarek
08-15-2018, 9:06 AM
I agree with Tom King, those single lower straps are best.

I haven't found the best one yet, but my observations having tried many are: I haven't found a two belt pad that the straps don't bunch up on and hurt the back of my knee, stretchy velcro single lower strap is quick, but the design of that strap needs to be narrow or it bunches up, and most importantly the face needs to be wide and rounded so you can move around, no flats or "shoe bottom" prints.

Because they are such a pain, I rarely use them. I do however use some cardboard a lot. Thich stuff, or double stack makes a huge difference.

Al Launier
08-15-2018, 10:05 AM
It seems everyone has a different opinion & I guess I do as well. I've had a total right knee replacement & the left is becoming a serious contender to follow suite, so I appreciate something soft to kneel on.
Having tried several over the years, believe it or not the best one so far is from Harbor Freight, https://www.harborfreight.com/hard-cap-gel-knee-pads-66124.html. I've looked at & tried on several from HD (https://www.homedepot.com/s/?search=knee%20pads), and understand some of these are better quality, yet I've found the HF knee pads (https://www.harborfreight.com/hard-cap-gel-knee-pads-66124.html) to be very comfortable, stay in place (don't drop or shift sideways), and I like the wider band secured with Velcro - easier to adjust the fit than a buckle & more comfortable than narrow straps.

Despite the variation in prices, as a homeowner with typical maintenance chores, I don't feel an expensive set of knee pads is necessary. As long as they are comfortable, last a while, and are reasonably priced, I'm good to go with that.

Derek Meyer
08-15-2018, 2:59 PM
The best knee pads I ever used were the volleyball knee pads I got when I was in high school. They are a fabric sleeve (similar to a Copperfit knee brace) with the pad on the front. They stay up great, are light and super comfortable. They work best on bare legs, so if you wear shorts a lot in the shop you should look into them. They are also relatively inexpensive.

When I tiled my basement floor I used the Dewalt knee pads. They were okay - kind of rigid and not the most comfortable, but adequate.

bill kaminski
08-18-2018, 8:13 PM
Plus 2..what Tom King said

Rich Engelhardt
08-23-2018, 4:48 AM
My biggest problem with knee pads is the way the straps cut into the back of my knees.
I'll take the sting and pain in my knees all day long over that nasty cutting type of pain in the back of my knees any day of the week.

Pad type kneelers? Yeah they work great if what you're doing allows you to stay in one spot. If the job you're doing requires any type of moving from spot to spot, they get real annoying real fast.


Duluth Trading also has some very durable paints with provisions for knee pads. If I was in the trades, I'd be all over those given how much stuff I've bought from them over the years!

I've often thought that some type of glue on or sew on "pouch" that could be stuck on any pair of pants - that would allow you to slip in a pad - would be ideal.

Tom M King
08-23-2018, 6:18 PM
If you only use lower straps, and have them just barely tight enough that they stay up, there is no cutting into the back of knees. The strap should be well below the knee, with only the shape of your calf holding it up. Thick padding not only makes it more comfortable for the knee, but by sinking into it some, the strap only becomes looser once you're on your knees.

Top straps are only good for being uncomfortable. Ones in pants don't stay where you need for them to if you need to move side to side.