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Keith Hankins
06-21-2018, 1:31 PM
Well on top of the news earlier this week on tarrifs on tools, now comes the news that internet providers that had been exempt in most cases from having to collect sales tax, now they are subject to collection. Great news for the brick and mortar stores, and to states, but bad for your wallet. I know I personally have tried to always tried to support local stores and yes that meant paying sales tax. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2018/06/21/supreme-court-allows-sales-taxes-online-purchases/699556002/

Dave Zellers
06-21-2018, 2:08 PM
This was inevitable. As was pointed out in the ruling, the economy has changed dramatically.

But the point in the dissent was that this should be handled by the legislative branch not the judicial which I agree with completely.

David Kumm
06-21-2018, 2:32 PM
The point missed by most media is that consumers were always liable for the sales tax even if not collected at the source. Almost every state imposes a use tax equivelent to the sales tax on goods brought into the state where sales tax was not collected. Unfortunately we all know how well the honor system works- particularly in taxation. While I agree that this may be a legislative issue, lets not lose track of the fact that the ruling is compensating for all of our bad behavior and would not be necessary if we were more honest. Dave

Jacob Mac
06-21-2018, 2:50 PM
Probably going to be a real boon to woodcraft.

Jim Becker
06-21-2018, 5:00 PM
The point missed by most media is that consumers were always liable for the sales tax even if not collected at the source.
This is absolutely true.

Alex Zeller
06-21-2018, 5:12 PM
Unfortunately this is going to hit small internet businesses pretty hard. South Dakota set a limit of $100k in sales or 200 transactions. That's not really that high of a limit. A large state like New York could put a small company out of business by simply tying them up in court. The legal fees could doom a smaller company. Just trying to figure out if an item is tax exempt (like most foods and clothing in Vermont) in each state will be a challenge. I'm betting we will see a company that provides a service where companies pay a monthly fee and in return they are always up to date on the latest tax rate for a given product.

Ray Newman
06-21-2018, 5:12 PM
Dave Zellers in post #2 is 'dead-nuts on'.

David Kumm
06-21-2018, 5:29 PM
About half of the states have adopted a uniform sales tax law to deal with the confusion and I suspect the ruling will hasten the others to join in. As an accountant I understand the hassle of dealing with the complexity but the internet has opened new markets so this is now part of the trade off. The seller must do what the buyer didn't. Dave

Dave Zellers
06-21-2018, 5:33 PM
Check's in the mail, Ray :D

John Jenkins4
06-21-2018, 6:18 PM
But the point in the dissent was that this should be handled by the legislative branch not the judicial which I agree with completely.

Right, but legislative solutions these days are like unicorns. :D

johnny means
06-21-2018, 6:57 PM
302 forever!:D

Jim Becker
06-21-2018, 7:31 PM
One effect to small businesses is that more, if not most, will have to utilize "accounting as a service" and hosted e-commerce solution arrangements if they are doing online business across state lines so that required sales tax collection and remittance is handled properly. Doing it in-house will be a tough row to hoe!

Aaron Rosenthal
06-22-2018, 12:45 AM
This is nothing new to me.
My pal bought a motorcycle from Ontario (a smaller province to the east of the left coast) and even though all the federal and provincial taxes had been paid there, he has to repay them here in order to register the ' bike.
If I buy something from out of province, the vendor charges me the appropriate local taxes, which they have to send to my provincial government.
The only time I "win" is if I buy something off the Internet in the USA and have it shipped to a mail drop in the US close by to me, I go and get it, and declare it, the customs person will probably say "have a nice day".
Every jurisdiction is hungry for money because everyone wants the "free" government services.

Keith Hankins
06-22-2018, 8:19 AM
Unfortunately this is going to hit small internet businesses pretty hard. South Dakota set a limit of $100k in sales or 200 transactions. That's not really that high of a limit. A large state like New York could put a small company out of business by simply tying them up in court. The legal fees could doom a smaller company. Just trying to figure out if an item is tax exempt (like most foods and clothing in Vermont) in each state will be a challenge. I'm betting we will see a company that provides a service where companies pay a monthly fee and in return they are always up to date on the latest tax rate for a given product.

The winner will be the software company that writes the software to account for it, and will probably collect an send on to the states for a fee....as a service to the store owner. .this will be passed along in cost to you the consumer....

I heard my daddy say only two things are certain, death..and TAXES. Cheers.

Jim Becker
06-22-2018, 9:54 AM
Solftware solutions like QuickBooks Online already have the ability to deal with all the sales tax jurisdictions for the US. The conundrum is going to be making the collection and remittance/reporting for all the potential jurisdictions that one might be selling into with online sales. If a small business needs to do the remittance/reporting individually, it's going to be a nightmare. There's going to need to be some kind of "clearing house" than handles this for it to work, or sales taxes are going to have to change from state/municipality to federal to insure things don't change to total insanity...

Perry Hilbert Jr
06-22-2018, 9:54 AM
And what of states that have no sales tax, like Delaware? Folks from PA and Maryland have been running to Delaware for decades to buy computers and appliances to avoid the sales taxes. This has created a nightmare. Things to consider.

1. I have a sales tax exemption in Pennsylvania for certain farming related items. Will that be recognized by an internet seller in New York? Or will I be zapped for New York Sales Tax? 2. If an internet seller in Idaho refuses to collect New York Sales tax, will a law suit by New York State in New York be valid? There had been a doctrine since the beginning of this country that one state will not enforce the tax laws of another state and a state will only enforce a foreign judgment if that foreign state had jurisdiction over the defendant to even grant a judgment. for instance, I moved to Pennsylvania in 1998. In 2004, the state of Virginia tried to enforce a judgment against me for 1999 and 2000 state taxes in Pennsylvania Courts. I defended on three grounds. 1) I was never served with papers for the Virginia suit and therefore the judgment was obtained in violation of due process and should not be recognized by Pennsylvania 2) I did not live there in those years to even owe taxes and 3) A centuries old doctrine that Pennsylvania will not enforce the tax laws of other states. The Judge agreed as to defense No. 3 and dismissed the case saying there was no reason to even consider the other grounds. If I were a small seller in Idaho with no plans to ever set forth in New York state, I would tell New York to stuff it. I often order agricultural parts on line. Even if I went to a brick and mortar store here in Pa, my purchase on most parts would be exempt from sales tax. (I have exemption forms on file at several places, TSC, feed mills and my local implement dealer.. I have exemption forms to supply to other businesses where I purchase items) For instance, if I buy a piece of lumber to turn into a chair for resale, I am exempt from PA sales tax. Would a specialty lumber company in MO recognize that exemption?

Jim Becker
06-22-2018, 9:56 AM
And what of states that have no sales tax, like Delaware? Folks from PA and Maryland have been running to Delaware for decades to buy computers and appliances to avoid the sales taxes.
Yes, folks do that. But technically, under the law, they still owe those taxes each year when they file their PA state income taxes. It's right there on the tax return as a matter of fact. That also applies to things we buy over the Internet. Of course...most folks don't report it. ;)

David Kumm
06-22-2018, 10:38 AM
Most businesses have known this was coming in some form or another for years. It will get handled and life will go on. The free lunch never lasts forever. Everyone gets upset when the weathy have a loophole- rightfully so- and this was a huge loophole but affected so many that you heard little of it. Dave

Jim Koepke
06-22-2018, 2:11 PM
But technically, under the law, they still owe those taxes each year when they file their PA state income taxes.

Living along the Columbia River affords many from Washington to shop in Oregon. Likewise many from Oregon come across the river to shop in Washington. In Washington cashiers often ask, "are you Washington?" Washington allows sales to Oregonians to be sans sales tax, there is no sales tax in Oregon. Of course the cashiers in Oregon do not ask about your residency to add a sales tax.

In Washington we do not have an income tax, so no one claims out of state purchases "when they file their WA state income taxes."

This will likely be a software fix where the money is collected through the entity facilitating payment. If so desired it could even be determined by Zip Code. Though if that were the case, Post Offices and Mail Address services will be booming close to the border in states without a sales tax.

Every piece of legislation will almost instantly have people trying to figure ways to get around such laws and regulations. That is only one way of how our laws end up so convoluted.

jtk

David Kumm
06-22-2018, 2:32 PM
Washington has a Consumers Use Tax return to be filed to pay the tax. Guessing the compliance was low. Dave

Carlos Alvarez
06-22-2018, 2:56 PM
My business delivers phone service to customers in several countries and all over the US. Imagine how complex it could be for us. But our legal advice was to treat OUR part of the service as local to our jurisdiction, and to let our providers deal with the local parts by not filing as tax exempt with them. This is different from physical goods of course. But now we have to go for legal review again to see if this changes anything.

Jim Becker
06-22-2018, 3:39 PM
Most businesses have known this was coming in some form or another for years. It will get handled and life will go on. The free lunch never lasts forever. Everyone gets upset when the weathy have a loophole- rightfully so- and this was a huge loophole but affected so many that you heard little of it. Dave

Yes, it's been inevitable that this would happen. The indications have been there for awhile now given how much commerce has migrated to on-line. Consumers might grumble, but this is a real challenge for small businesses as has bee mentioned. "Collection" is the easy part. It's the reporting and remittance to what is potentially many, many jurisdictions that is going to provide the most angst. Small businesses that sell thought the Amazon platform are better positioned already because Amazon already collects state taxes in all the states that require them. But even they apparently have some work to do to support the multitude of county and local jurisdictions over and above states. I personally have to pay attention to this because I'm smack in the middle of starting up a small business that will be selling items online to non-local folks. PA is easy for me and I'm already setup for that, but now I have to be concerned with beyond PA. It will be a topic of discussion when I meet with my accountant next Tuesday for sure.

David Kumm
06-22-2018, 4:26 PM
Yes Jim, an unintended consequence could be to further strengthen Amazon's dominance in the marketplace. At some point there will be reasonable software available to small sellers but I worry that Amazon will someday swallow up way too much commerce and our choices will be limited. Way to early to tell. Dave

Bill Dufour
06-22-2018, 6:17 PM
What an I supposed to do if I sell a few things on Ebay for say $500 total in one year?
Bill D.

Carlos Alvarez
06-22-2018, 6:29 PM
What an I supposed to do if I sell a few things on Ebay for say $500 total in one year?
Bill D.

Your personal used goods? Nothing.

Jim Becker
06-22-2018, 7:41 PM
Bill, Carlos is correct...selling off personal property occasionally isn't generally covered by this. But if someone was to be perceived as constantly selling off a lot of stuff, there might be some question about whether or not they are really a "stealth business" and that would affect a whole lot of things from a government purview.

There is a property down the street from me that has a multi-day "yard sale" about once a month. There's just no way that they are selling off personal property. It's a stealth antique and junk business. ;)

Bruce Wrenn
06-23-2018, 9:45 PM
For sellers, as a general rule state taxes are no problem, it's the local taxes that are going to be a nightmare. Here in Apex, our zip code covers two counties, and the New Hill Zip code covers parts of three counties.. A few people live in NC with Virginia addresses and some in Virginia with NC addresses. Most don't think of it, but when you are out of state, and consume a meal, you owe your home state the taxes, if you return home before your next BM. I now have to charge my customers 7.25% sales tax on my labor. Being a sole owner, this amounts to a 7.25% income tax surcharge on my income tax. No government agency has ever said "We don't need as much money as last year!"

Dave Zellers
06-23-2018, 10:45 PM
Most don't think of it, but when you are out of state, and consume a meal, you owe your home state the taxes, if you return home before your next BM.

Does that mean what I think it means? :eek: Technically, one might need to wait for 2 BM's to avoid the taxes on that meal.

Curt Harms
06-24-2018, 8:04 AM
Yes Jim, an unintended consequence could be to further strengthen Amazon's dominance in the marketplace. At some point there will be reasonable software available to small sellers but I worry that Amazon will someday swallow up way too much commerce and our choices will be limited. Way to early to tell. Dave

Amazon has been collecting sales tax for some time now so they already have the infrastructure and they are well versed in providing IT services to others so yeah, they likely have a leg up. I imagine somebody like Intuit (Quickbooks), PayPal and Square could be players as well, they just charge a bit more for their services.

Jim Becker
06-24-2018, 8:54 AM
I read another article (I can't remember which one or where to link to it) on this last night that was interesting. The going forward impact of this ruling will depend upon how the states (and localities) react to is. From a narrower perspective, the ruling is primarily about SD's desire to collect state sales taxes on businesses who do more than $100K or 200 transactions to customers who reside in their state. The article speculated that "may" help the "micro-businesses", at least in the short term given the threshold in the SD case for compliance. But there was also agreement that ultimately, there would need to be some kind of Federal action to keep things sane and fair if the requirements to collect and remit sales taxes becomes universal across all taxing entities...which number in the thousands within the US when you add in the municipal/local type sales taxes. Here in SE PA, for example, Philadelphia has a 1% sales tax over the 6% state sales tax.

Grant Wilkinson
06-24-2018, 11:02 AM
I live in Canada, so my experience is likely different than most of yours. However, when I order anything from the US, I am charged the state tax of the state where the seller is. So, clearly some sellers are able to add tax to the purchase price, even if the buyer is out of state.
In Canada, pretty much every vendor I deal with asks where I live and charges the correct rate of tax for my province, notwithstanding the location of the vendor. This has been the case for as long as I can remember. I'm sure that US vendors will be able to do the same thing. I appreciate that we have only 13 rates of tax and you have 50, but the computer logic is the same.

Stephen Tashiro
06-24-2018, 11:28 AM
However, when I order anything from the US, I am charged the state tax of the state where the seller is. So, clearly some sellers are able to add tax to the purchase price, even if the buyer is out of state.


That's the typical experienceo of US citizens who make face-to-face purchases when out of their state. I suppose, in theory, if a citizen of state A buys something in state B and pays sales tax to state B, he could file a tax return in state B and claim a refund. Not many people do that!

Are state sales tax laws generally written so the state where the buyer resides mandates the tax? I wonder if city and county tax laws generally specify that a transaction is taxed because the seller is in the city or county.

Perhaps the requirement to tax internet purchases according to the citizenship of the buyer will lead to the same requirement being enforced on brick-and-mortar stores. It would be an "about face" to the usual complaints that internet sellers have an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores in tax collection. The internet sellers can complain that brick-and-mortar stores aren't required to tax according to the citizenship of the buyer.

Ken Combs
06-24-2018, 3:39 PM
My state (OK+) has a state sales tax but addition various cities and counties have local sales taxes. And, the rule defining tax owed is the point where the transaction is completed. So, if I order lumber delivered to my home in the city limits I owe both city and state sales tax. But, if doing work for another outside the city limits, it only requires payment of state tax. What makes it difficult for software is the locations are in the same zip code. Probably the only way to accurately determine it programmatically would be to have a table of GPS coordinates/tax rates. What a nightmare to create and update!

An earlier poster mentioned 50 tax rates, but it is much, much worse than that!

My daughter works in accounting for a company that has presences is several states and has to deal with sales tax. Because they deal with a smaller number of rates they did it manually, and that consumed a lot of time so they had to purchase a software package to help. The worst part is demands for audit info from states who think they are being shortchanged. Even if they are not losing out, the audit consumes a week of an employee's time to prove it. To date there are only a few states that do that, but imagine the impact on small businesses if/when they get hit with 50 such requests.

Perry Hilbert Jr
06-24-2018, 4:52 PM
PA's sales tax is a nightmare. No tax on clothes, but a tax on neck ties. A sales tax on dishes and glasses, but not if made of paper. Tax on books, except Bible's. No tax on magazines, if published more than 12 times per year. No tax on Newspapers. No tax on food purchased to prepare at home, but ready to eat food gets taxed. Sales tax on automobiles. But not on tractors, if used to grow food for sale. No tax on candy. The rules have so many stupid exceptions that PA merchants can't get it right, how will a business in Oregon get it straight. And what of foreign sellers? In the past year, I have probably purchased more from ebay businesses overseas than here in the US. Germany, India, Japan and China. Will those purchases still be sales tax exempt? ( I understand that I may owe a PA use tax.) Frankly, some of the hardware items I use are incredibly inexpensive overseas compared to here. For instance brass plated 8mm screw eyes are $1.89 for 300 of them, including shipping. Never found a US supplier for less than 5 times that price.

Bill Dufour
06-25-2018, 12:32 AM
In California there is no tax on food. Buy a $5.00 footlong sandwich and pay $5.00. But if they toast it, for free, it costs $5.36 since it is now prepared food and that is taxed.
There used to be road tax on car tires on top of sales tax. Now they only charge the extra tax if the tire weighs over 50 pounds or some thing. Theory being road tax is only for big commercial trucks with big heavy tires.
Some thrift stores charge sales tax, some do not.
No sales tax on real estate due to massive continuous lobbying by realtors.
Bill D

Rod Sheridan
06-25-2018, 8:11 AM
As cumbersome as it may be to get implemented, it's good that the taxes are being collected for 2 reasons.

It helps level the playing field between mail order and retail vendors, and it restores the revenue to the state or locality that was lost due to mail order sales.

regards, Rod.

Jim Becker
06-25-2018, 10:26 AM
Rod, I believe you are spot on with that. And with the massive shift of commerce to online businesses (some with brick and mortar; some without), there is a need to do this kind of thing. My concern is with the current complexity that having as many as 3000 tax jurisdictions brings, particularly for the small operator. Ultimately, this is going to have to be simplified and standardized so that "the paperwork" doesn't drive small businesses out of business. It may be time to move to a more national approach in that respect if there's an expectation that a small or micro business is going to need to collect "sales tax" regardless of where the buyer resides.

Keith Downing
06-25-2018, 1:08 PM
This has to be one of the most complex issues faced in awhile. I can literally argue for both sides. No sales tax was a huge loop hole. Small merchants having to collect from 50 states and their municipalities is beyond unfair.

That tells me there should have (and maybe will be) some legislation enacted to meet in the middle. In my mind, something like this is fair and equitable:

A simple chart of sales taxes to be collected from internet purchases, by state. They could all be the same rate, or differ by state (especially since some states don't collect sales tax). The rate could also be something in the range of 2/3 - 3/4 of the actual sales tax of the states, giving a small break to the consumer, since the goods and services did not require any benefit from the state (such as infrastructure or oversight) to be produced.

Hopefully for once we can use common sense to come to a conclusion that works before all 50 states enact different rules that will have to be rolled back.

Brett Gregory
06-25-2018, 9:20 PM
There are a lot of Aussies, including me, that purchase goods from the USA and elsewhere. Sometimes they are sent directly from the retailer, so I imagine that there would be no USA taxes applied, but many of us have a warehouse address in CA or OR where we can accumulate packages and consolidate them into one carton for shipping to Oz.

So my question is: is the State Sales Tax based upon the receiving address or the sending address? (I think the former, but not entirely sure). That is, if I purchase something from a state that has 10% sales tax, but have it posted to Oregon where there is no state tax, will I still pay no state tax? (County and City tax may be another issue).


It's actually going to get worse for Aussies from July 1, 2018. Our govt has decided to impose our Federal Goods & Services Tax of 10% on all packages coming in, where previously only those over AUD1000 (~USD730) were due for it. We don't necessarily mind paying the tax, but the Govt has made it extraordinarily complex, as Govts tend to do.

In fact any overseas retailer or company who sends more than $75k pa to Oz will now have to collect the 10% GST at the transaction point, and forward it to the Aust Govt every quarter. Strange but true. So Lee Valley for example will become a Tax Collector for the Aust Govt from later this week! Amazon have (sensibly) flipped the bird at this preposterous idea, and will geo-block Aussies from all their sites except the fledgling Australian site.

This is a 3 year trial, and many or most of us believe that it will cost more to implement than it will raise in tax. Perhaps it won't even make it to 3 years......

We are expecting chaos and mayhem! Customs warehouses piled high with packages awaiting tax payments. Not enough staff to deal with it all, and so it will go on.

Yonak Hawkins
06-25-2018, 11:31 PM
Down-to-earth food for thought, Keith.

Rod Sheridan
06-26-2018, 7:42 AM
Rod, I believe you are spot on with that. And with the massive shift of commerce to online businesses (some with brick and mortar; some without), there is a need to do this kind of thing. My concern is with the current complexity that having as many as 3000 tax jurisdictions brings, particularly for the small operator. Ultimately, this is going to have to be simplified and standardized so that "the paperwork" doesn't drive small businesses out of business. It may be time to move to a more national approach in that respect if there's an expectation that a small or micro business is going to need to collect "sales tax" regardless of where the buyer resides.

yes Jim, I can see how much work and confusion all the different tax requirements could cause.

Perhaps it's time for a national "online" sales tax that would be the same in each jurisdiction?

regards, Rod.

Jim Becker
06-26-2018, 9:25 AM
Perhaps it's time for a national "online" sales tax that would be the same in each jurisdiction?


Likely necessary long term, but I don't see how it could be for online-only because that puts online at odds with brick-and-mortar with potential disadvantages. And then there is the root of the complexity...the thousands of local/municipal jurisdictions, like Philadelphia, that have their own small sales tax on top of state sales tax. This is complicated because of the way the system currently exists plus states' rights, etc. A major transformation would need to occur and we all know just how likely that would be "effectively" approached at the government level...

So, if it's held that small operators need to collect sales tax based on receiving location, including local type taxes above state sales taxes, it's mostly going to be an opportunity for the accounting service providers and business partners like Amazon Marketplace to deal with the tax stuff behind the scenes on behalf of those small operators. Otherwise, small business will get killed off pretty quick. And that would be sad.

David Kumm
06-26-2018, 10:12 AM
As per my earlier post, half the states have all ready singed on to a unified sales tax law to ease reporting. I suspect that this will speed some more to join. Dave

Carlos Alvarez
06-26-2018, 11:32 AM
Our state recently changed the structure to a unified reporting system where you pay once and they handle disbursement. Previously we had to file in multiple jurisdictions within the state. I don't know the full details, but our bookkeeper says it's been a huge improvement. As said above, more states will move to it also.

Van Huskey
06-26-2018, 11:22 PM
It helps level the playing field between mail order and retail vendors,

regards, Rod.

While both conventional wisdom and logical it may actually have the opposite effect. The final cost of internet supplied goods will likely increase and come closer to brick and mortar prices this will result in an overall spending increase (for partial internet shoppers). When consumer prices go up it causes consumers to be more price sensitive so it may drive the internet shopper to do MORE shopping online to help balance the overall increase on the goods they buy. That along with the convenience and the time/gas/mileage on the car savings they have become accustomed to may produce a counterintuitive deleterious impact on the brick and mortar. The increase in trouble and cost for small businesses selling on the internet might well increase the use of sales platforms like Amazon, giving Amazon more money to revisit the heavy market penetration pricing. Many states and local municipalities may well see a significant increase in tax revenue but the local brick and mortar stores may be hurt even more and the states will have less incentive to save them.

Carlos Alvarez
06-27-2018, 12:07 PM
While both conventional wisdom and logical it may actually have the opposite effect.

+1

There will be unintended and unknown consequences. There always are, and we never learn.

Example...my state, like many others, increased tobacco taxes to effectively make them penalties for making an unpopular choice. So I circumvent them when I order cigars and pipe tobacco to be shipped in. I also help Canadians and Californians circumvent their even more insane taxes by shipping cigars to them. When you create illogical barriers, people will find a way around them. In addition, it starts to make all laws and all taxes look less reasonable and worth ignoring also.

Jim Andrew
07-03-2018, 2:17 PM
Don't know why, but Kansas is a high tax state. We have high sales tax, income tax, and ever increasing property tax. And we live right next to Oklahoma, which is a low tax state. Makes me want to sell out and move. The legislature passed a law that said anything farmers use to produce food is sales tax exempt, but the bureaucrats decided to tax half the things we need. Went to TSC the other day, needed to replace the jack on my grain drill, and had to pay tax. Would like to see how many bureaucrats it would take to lift that drill! They also do not think we need fences to raise cattle. They tell us that fences are "improvements" to our property. Like to see bureaucrats raise livestock without fences. When a cow gets loose in town it makes the news on TV!

Brian Elfert
07-03-2018, 8:20 PM
Don't know why, but Kansas is a high tax state. We have high sales tax, income tax, and ever increasing property tax. And we live right next to Oklahoma, which is a low tax state. Makes me want to sell out and move. The legislature passed a law that said anything farmers use to produce food is sales tax exempt, but the bureaucrats decided to tax half the things we need. Went to TSC the other day, needed to replace the jack on my grain drill, and had to pay tax. Would like to see how many bureaucrats it would take to lift that drill! They also do not think we need fences to raise cattle. They tell us that fences are "improvements" to our property. Like to see bureaucrats raise livestock without fences. When a cow gets loose in town it makes the news on TV!

Kansas income tax rates are nothing compared to Minnesota. Your highest rate is 5.7%. Minnesota starts at 5.35% and goes as high as 9.85%!

Jim Becker
07-03-2018, 9:10 PM
Let's keep this focused on the potential impact of sales taxes on Internet buying and selling, please.

Jim
Forum Moderator

Bruce Volden
07-05-2018, 8:12 PM
Interesting thread I've been reading. Sometimes a little OT but what would one expect?
I've no problem paying Uncle Sam or the state. In fact I would pay more - with stipulations.
Let ME decide entirely where I will put my taxes.
But I'm sure I'm not smart enough for that.

Bruce