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Patrick Irish
04-05-2018, 8:02 PM
Getting married in October, mid 30s, kids will Be soon after that.

Iím envisioning my time in the garage to dramatically fall off. Whatís been everyoneís experience?

Woodworking is a hobby. Make some stuff here and there and sell it. My two car garage is filled to that max. I donít think I can add another tool at this point. About 20% of my time is wheeling things around due to space. I also reload and cast my own and havenít touched that stuff in a year. It helps I have summers off from work which will give me time. As weíve been planning and getting closer to our day I seriously look at some tools and think, should I just sell this all cuz when will I find the time?

Matthew Brawley
04-05-2018, 8:22 PM
Will you have the same amount of time, the answer is no. However, your wife should understand that you enjoy your hobby, it helps you de-stress and she should want you to continue that as much as you can. I have been married three years and all she asks is that I make stuff for her or do the honey do list around the house. Good trade off.

Bill McNiel
04-05-2018, 9:11 PM
Marriage should not reduce your "garage time", dating is a lot more time consuming. The kids will virtually eliminate any concept of free, or me time.

Jerry Bruette
04-05-2018, 10:01 PM
Maybe she'll take some interest in your hobbies, spend time together making sawdust and punching holes in targets.

Never thought my wife would take interest in hunting when we got married, and she doesn't always go with me but we share interest in each others hobbies.

I wouldn't sell all the toys, if you start the kids young you'll have fun teaching and sharing time with your new partners in the shop and at the range.

Nathan Johnson
04-05-2018, 10:08 PM
If you're in the garage with tools running you won't be able to hear her.

Chase Mueller
04-06-2018, 8:10 AM
Short answer, expect less time in the garage. Not no time in the garage, but lett. Happy wife, happy life. Congratulations by the way

Rich Engelhardt
04-06-2018, 8:24 AM
Getting Married - garage time plummet?Maybe - but - count on time in the doghouse to soar....

Tom Stenzel
04-06-2018, 9:05 AM
It depends on who you marry. My wife likes staining and finishing. Talk about a win!

But the comment about children is true too. I remember watching Norm on TV who could build a chest of drawers and have the first coat of stain on in a 1/2 hour show. It takes me an hour just to get the bicycles, toys and junk out of the way before I even start.

Yeah, you might spend a lot of time in the garage. In terms of projects getting done-not so much to show for it. Having the little ones help and teach them- you accomplish a lot right there. But that can't be measured in terms of projects done. Your goals change.

-Tom

Jim Becker
04-06-2018, 9:24 AM
You may experience less free time, particularly if kids enter the picture, but it's very important that both you and your spouse have "some" free time to keep things in balance and help reduce stress. And that needs to be "regular" for both of you, so you and your partner-in-crime should be talking about it and planning for it now.

Brian Nguyen
04-06-2018, 10:27 AM
Here's my experience as someone who's 38 yo, been married for 9 years now with 2 kids (5 y/o and 2 y/o):

Woodworking is your hobby, so take it from me... if you'd like to maintain enough "me" time in the shop then encourage your wife to take up some hobbies of her own. If she ends up taking on woodworking, GREAT!! If not, she's preoccupied and you get to be in the garage. Obviously, you would also take time for each other but a healthy marriage NEEDS some alone time otherwise there would be some frictions.

All of that goes out the window when you have kids. Kids will suck up everyone's free time until they're in basically out of the house. Initially, it's just taking care of them as babies but then it's a lot of driving them around to school, after school activities, weekend soccer games, etc. You'd be lucky to have an a few hours in the garage while they're running around playing in the backyard, but if you're me then you'd have a daughter that's almost attached to the hip so running a power tool is next to impossible unless her big brother can drag her away to a game of "tag".

It does get a bit easier though as the kids grow, but I'm also older and enjoy beer more so on nights when the kids are asleep earlier than normal instead of rushing into the garage to work on a project I'm finding myself choosing to just kick up my feet with an iced cold beer instead. Nothing stays constant in life, including hobbies.

Matt Day
04-06-2018, 1:31 PM
Congrats on the upcoming marriage!

Iíve been married for 8 years. The first couple years of marriage and while dating I had plenty of shop time and time for other hobbies like mountain biking which I did seriously for decades, though less than when I was single of course.

After we moved to Ohio (poor place for mountain biking) and kids came along, I basically gave up mountain biking which was hard to accept. So hobbies will likely get adjusted. You kind of have to pick your favorite(s).

My situation is a bit different because Iím a stay at home dad. When they were babies and crawling and napping, Iíd find a short burst of time here and there to get in the shop, baby monitor in hand of course. But, basically none. Those small people require constant attention. Thankfully for smartphones, I could educate myself and participate in forums like this one. Thatís about as close to actually making sawdust as I could get for a while.

Meanwhile, for exercise I started running instead of riding, with the kids in tow in a double or single Bob jogging stroller.

After about 2.5 years I began to see the light, when my daughter started preschool. Then I only had one kid to take care of! The next year, I actually had a couple hours to myself, to run errands or exercise.

Iím now in my late 30ís and have a 5yo and almost 4yo. My my oldest starts kindergarten next year and my son will be in Pre-K. Iíll have from 9-2 to do household stuff, exercise, and work in the shop. Maybe even mountain bike every now and then.

But, in your case since your working, the best thing to do is plan to get shop time after the kids go to bed and before work. On weekends, tag team with the kids so you both can get free time. And if you have family in town, recruit them to help with the kids.

John K Jordan
04-06-2018, 3:13 PM
I'm sure that will depend on her personality, yours, and how you both communicate, coordinate, and negotiate things. I think it's best to communicate about this now - for example, does she expect to park her car in the garage? Is the garage part of the house and will the noise and dust create a problem? And maybe she's concerned about having to cut back on some of her interests.

I've been married 48 years, since age 20. My Lovely Bride is very supportive of the things I do in the shop (and around the farm and elsewhere) although she has no interest in any of those things herself. (She did come down the hill and visit the shop once! I was shocked.) But she knew from the beginning I had a wide variety of interests. My "hobby" time did drop off significantly when the kids were young, for example I quit flying airplanes and invested the time (and the money) in the boys instead.

One shop suggestion - if you don't already, take up woodturning! I can spend just a few hours and make something on the lathe when something from flat wood might take me days or weeks. And woodturning can be done in less space - until I built a shop a few years ago my turning "shop" was 1/2 of a 2-car garage.

Also, whatever you do in the shop, be sure to make plenty of things for her! If you haven't already, start now. :) Surprise her with lots of things, they don't have to be big and don't have to be masterpieces. And when the kids are little, shop opportunities increase and both they and mama are happy. I made this soon after we were married and so far three sons and two grandsons have made good use of it!

383258 383257

JKJ



Getting married in October, mid 30s, kids will Be soon after that.

I’m envisioning my time in the garage to dramatically fall off. What’s been everyone’s experience?

Woodworking is a hobby. Make some stuff here and there and sell it. My two car garage is filled to that max. I don’t think I can add another tool at this point. About 20% of my time is wheeling things around due to space. I also reload and cast my own and haven’t touched that stuff in a year. It helps I have summers off from work which will give me time. As we’ve been planning and getting closer to our day I seriously look at some tools and think, should I just sell this all cuz when will I find the time?

Stan Calow
04-06-2018, 4:00 PM
What John K said about parking. I could never get away with monopolizing the garage. Yes, your available free time will shrink. Also the time you can make loud noises. Dust control is suddenly much more important.

Nicholas Lawrence
04-06-2018, 7:17 PM
I have spent a lot of very pleasant evenings with my wife sitting on the saw bench spending time with me while I worked on something in the shop. Works with hand tools. Probably not with a power shop.

Cary Falk
04-06-2018, 7:53 PM
I would say that getting married wouldn't necessarily reduce your shop time. House improvements and honey do lists keep me in the shop. Little kids will probably kill it until they are old enough to be in the shop with you if they are interested.

Matt Day
04-06-2018, 10:23 PM
Nah, kids donít kill it until theyíre old enough to be working with you. There are a number of ways to get shop time as I described above.

Amd, for instance when my son used to nap Iíd have a little nook for my daughter to play with a tablet while I cleaned up or did something relatively dust free. And my kids are getting just about old enough where they can play by themselves upstairs while i work in the basement shop and check on them every 10-15 minutes. I donít need to do that since while they're at school I have plenty of shop time, but I could see that happening if I worked a full time job.

Mike Cutler
04-07-2018, 8:13 AM
My advice, for what it's worth, is to try an achieve a balance.
I've been married for 34 years now, and it's not so much that "shop time" goes down, but unproductive time needs to go down. In other words, "puttering".
As long as my wife can see progress on a project, around the house, or a furnishing, and knows I'm working toward an end goal, it's not a problem. She's also been the recipient of most of my work, so that has to be kept in context also.;)
It's a lot easier for someone not connected to wood working to understand you, when they can see a tangible result. Unless you do wood working for a living, most of your efforts will result in something that can be seen and used, daily, in and around the house. That makes it easier.

Congrats on your upcoming wedding.

Todd Bender
04-07-2018, 8:27 AM
Speaking from experience, I would hold off on selling tools until they become expensive to store (expensive has many meanings). Always less painful to keep a tool than have to buy it again later.

Erik Loza
04-07-2018, 11:27 AM
...it's very important that both you and your spouse have "some" free time to keep things in balance and help reduce stress. And that needs to be "regular" for both of you, so you and your partner-in-crime should be talking about it and planning for it now.

This ^^^...

Both my wife and I got married in our mid-30's. No kids but obviously, we have some different hobbies. She is an extrovert while I am an introvert. So, she understands that garage-time is important to my well being just like I understand that manicure and pedicure dates with her girlfriends are important to her balance in life. IMHO, the most important thing is that neither one of us wants to "complete" or "fix" each other. We were OK with ourselves going into marriage and "enhance" each other's respective lives, if that makes sense. Congratulations on your engagement and hope you and she have many happy years together.

Erik

Mike Cary
04-08-2018, 9:40 AM
Will your garage time plummet? Well for the first week I hope so!

Joe Bradshaw
04-08-2018, 9:04 PM
My late wife and I did not share the same hobbies and spare time interests. She started in ceramics and then moved to oil painting and finally to porcelain doll making. Along the way, we both tried pottery and stained glass. I got to make her stuff that she needed for her hobbies. I won't even get into her miniature donkeys. I was the chief fence builder and hay hauler. She bought even bought me my first Oneway lathe. We were in a Woodcraft store and I was looking at the Oneway and saying that I would like to get one in the future. I damn near had a heart attack, when she went up to the checkout and threw down the plastic and bought the lathe. Of course, I never asked what her hobbies cost.
Joe

John K Jordan
04-09-2018, 8:52 PM
... won't even get into her miniature donkeys. I was the chief fence builder and hay hauler. ...

I love mini donkeys! I've had two females for years and last year got a very young gelded male so I guess I have a "herd" now. :)

JKJ

Mike Ontko
04-10-2018, 6:12 PM
If you're in the garage with tools running you won't be able to hear her.

LOL then, there's always the safety issue -- don't distract me when the equipment is running :)

Seriously though, Mr Irish, the very nature of marriage is that you are offering to contribute a part of your personal life in order to build a shared partnership with someone else that will hopefully result in something positive and greater than what either of you could have done on your own. I've heard that a successful marriage is an 80/20 endeavor--your part (both of you, actually) is to always give 80% to the relationship and expect no more than 20% out of it. And that does not include the addition of children (house pets and in laws are another issue entirely).

There's always time in life for what's important. The challenge is in identifying and attending to the things that are truly important. And nobody can tell you what that is in your own life.

So, with all that being said, you'll have to realize too that a good number of the folks that your going to get responses from here are way past the point of those early years in a relationship and are now finding more time for themselves and their craft. So for now, make time for whatever shop time you can squeeze in, keep learning and practicing so you're ready when things open up a bit more.

And, congrats!

Chase Mueller
04-11-2018, 8:23 AM
LOL then, there's always the safety issue -- don't distract me when the equipment is running :)

Seriously though, Mr Irish, the very nature of marriage is that you are offering to contribute a part of your personal life in order to build a shared partnership with someone else that will hopefully result in something positive and greater than what either of you could have done on your own. I've heard that a successful marriage is an 80/20 endeavor--your part (both of you, actually) is to always give 80% to the relationship and expect no more than 20% out of it. And that does not include the addition of children (house pets and in laws are another issue entirely).

There's always time in life for what's important. The challenge is in identifying and attending to the things that are truly important. And nobody can tell you what that is in your own life.

So, with all that being said, you'll have to realize too that a good number of the folks that your going to get responses from here are way past the point of those early years in a relationship and are now finding more time for themselves and their craft. So for now, make time for whatever shop time you can squeeze in, keep learning and practicing so you're ready when things open up a bit more.

And, congrats!

+12 on that. Wise words, Mike.

Todd Trebuna
04-11-2018, 9:03 AM
29 years in with my high school sweetheart. What makes you a good worker is what will make you a good father. Time, patience and practice. If you put that into your marriage, then you'll be fine. Yes, you will spend less time in the garage, as you should. The benefit will be building something just as lasting and twice as worthwhile. The greatest gift to give your spouse is your presence. The time you put in now, will pay off down the road. All my children are adults now and I can honestly say, the time spent investing in our relationship has paid off a thousand times over. Along the way she developed a love of sewing, so we can work on "our own stuff" and still come together later in the day to marinate in each others presence.

Peter Kelly
04-11-2018, 10:06 AM
Getting married in October, mid 30s, kids will Be soon after that.

I’m envisioning my time in the garage to dramatically fall off. What’s been everyone’s experience?

Woodworking is a hobby. Make some stuff here and there and sell it. My two car garage is filled to that max. I don’t think I can add another tool at this point. About 20% of my time is wheeling things around due to space. I also reload and cast my own and haven’t touched that stuff in a year. It helps I have summers off from work which will give me time. As we’ve been planning and getting closer to our day I seriously look at some tools and think, should I just sell this all cuz when will I find the time?Sell off the things you don't absolutely need and sort out how to really optimise the space so you don't have to continually move everything around. Grizzly has a free on-line shop planner (http://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner) you might find useful.

Wade Lippman
04-12-2018, 1:05 PM
Will you have the same amount of time, the answer is no. However, your wife should understand that you enjoy your hobby, it helps you de-stress and she should want you to continue that as much as you can. I have been married three years and all she asks is that I make stuff for her or do the honey do list around the house. Good trade off.

After 32 years of marriage... Your wife will explain that doing yard chores and cleaning the house will help you de-stress much more effectively than any hobby. In fact, failing to do yard chores and cleaning the house will stress you way beyond any hobby's capacity to help.

Gets worse with children. But it is all SO rewarding. Good luck.

Bill Kelleher
04-13-2018, 2:20 PM
Getting married in October, mid 30s, kids will Be soon after that.

Iím envisioning my time in the garage to dramatically fall off. Whatís been everyoneís experience?

Woodworking is a hobby. Make some stuff here and there and sell it. My two car garage is filled to that max. I donít think I can add another tool at this point. About 20% of my time is wheeling things around due to space. I also reload and cast my own and havenít touched that stuff in a year. It helps I have summers off from work which will give me time. As weíve been planning and getting closer to our day I seriously look at some tools and think, should I just sell this all cuz when will I find the time?

step one,make her some thing very nice (in my case a corner china closet)
Step two,Start on the matching dining room set inviting her down for input on wood choices, inlays etc.
Step three, try to figure out a way that she will allow you to come OUT of the garage
Bill K
Happily married 33 years ,or on woodworking years four dining room tables......

lowell holmes
04-14-2018, 11:03 AM
After forty years of marriage, I don't think in the long haul there will be much interruption. Don't sell anything for at least a year. By that time, you will
will be settled into the new routine.

Your priorities will change somewhat. It is an adventure.