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Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 2:30 PM
I comb through this forum quite often. Often enough that I've seen every page. Recently I came across a thread from 2017 about "things that make you go hmmmm".. or maybe it was huuuuu.. Anyway, point is, I noticed a failry strong distaste for tattoos that many of you seem to have, but specifies military tattoos were deemed acceptable. I'm curious as to why? I'm more than willing to argue all day and night about all the misinformation out there regarding tattoos, but for now, I'd love to hear from the older generation about why they feel the way they feel about them. I'm sure there are exceptions here, some may think they're great, or even have some, but it does appear that most of the older generation does not agree with them. I just want to find out why, if you have the time. I'd love to offer my views reflecting your opinions. Lets keep it classy eh? We're all adults here.

Mike Henderson
04-03-2018, 3:05 PM
I just don't like the look of a heavily tattooed person, male or female. Many times, it's obvious that the person doesn't have a lot of money and I wonder why they wasted so much money on those tattoos.

Mike

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 3:09 PM
Many times, it's obvious that the person doesn't have a lot of money and I wonder why they wasted so much money on those tattoos.

Mike


Totally get not liking the look, but is there a particular reason? Honestly just curious. I love picking people brains. Especially people older than myself (22). It fascinates me.
How is it obvious they don't have a lot of money?

Mike Henderson
04-03-2018, 3:17 PM
Totally get not liking the look, but is there a particular reason? Honestly just curious. I love picking people brains. Especially people older than myself (22). It fascinates me.
How is it obvious they don't have a lot of money?

Certainly, it's a guess about whether someone you see is wealthy or in poverty. But if they project as being in poverty in their clothes, cleanliness, manners, actions, etc. you tend to assume they're not wealthy.

Mike

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 3:30 PM
Certainly, it's a guess about whether someone you see is wealthy or in poverty. But if they project as being in poverty in their clothes, cleanliness, manners, actions, etc. you tend to assume they're not wealthy.

Mike


Very reasonable point. Thank you for your input.
I do have to add, even though I have quite a few tattoos all over the place, I don't understand why someone would pay for shotty work, especially when they cant afford it. Lord knows I'd love to get more, already have my next few planned, but will not get any until the money is saved, plus a generous tip. No sense in possibly putting yourself on a budget constraint or possibly not being able to pay a bill for a tattoo.

Roger Nair
04-03-2018, 3:39 PM
Tats, to me, is a kind of sub culture emblem that denotes a kinship, a conversation starter or identifier OR NOT. I'm 68 and an untouched pale white canvas. Just get to know the tatted ones and solutions will emerge.

Mike Henderson
04-03-2018, 3:45 PM
Very reasonable point. Thank you for your input.
I do have to add, even though I have quite a few tattoos all over the place, I don't understand why someone would pay for shotty work, especially when they cant afford it. Lord knows I'd love to get more, already have my next few planned, but will not get any until the money is saved, plus a generous tip. No sense in possibly putting yourself on a budget constraint or possibly not being able to pay a bill for a tattoo.

I would have no clue whether the work was good or terrible. But from being friends with ex-military people who have tattoos, I know that the colors tend to fade and all that's left is the black - because the black doesn't fade.

But let me turn it around and ask you, "Why do you want tattoos?" Is it a statement of some kind? Or a tribe thing? Or what?

Mike

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 3:46 PM
Tats, to me, is a kind of sub culture emblem that denotes a kinship, a conversation starter or identifier OR NOT. I'm 68 and an untouched pale white canvas. Just get to know the tatted ones and solutions will emerge.


Thank you. That is the number one thing I preach when someone makes snarky comments about me being tattooed. Don't understand something? Ask. I speak for a lot of tattooed folks that love it when people ask us what/if the tattoo means anything. Personally, each one has a specific meaning, or story behind it. And that's how it will stay.

Jim Becker
04-03-2018, 3:46 PM
Chase, some of this is likely due to the changing perception of body art in general over time. "Back in the day", tattoos were more common with some demographics and totally absent from most others. It's a lot more mainstream today. I personally don't have any tattoos and honestly, there was a time when seeing someone with obvious art raised certain concerns that I would shamefully say are discriminatory by current societal standards. I left those thoughts behind decades ago, however. At this point, I don't even bat an eyelash and even enjoy seeing some of the amazing, tasteful work.

Marshall Harrison
04-03-2018, 3:48 PM
I don't really care much one way or the other about other people's tattoos. Though some look great and other people sometime have a trashy hodge podge of random stuff.

I don't want one personally as I don't want anything on my body that I can't easily change or discard. I change clothes, underwear and socks etc on a regular basis. Why would I want to be stuck with a tattoo for the rest of my life?

Also some of my past occupations identifying marks could get you recognized and killed. So even in my military days I avoided tats.

Both of my daughter's have tattoos. One wanted to get sister tattoos; some saying that she liked that would start on her back and finish on her sister's back. Seemed stupid to me unless they always stood next to each other in the correct order.

Stan Calow
04-03-2018, 3:49 PM
I'm curious as to why you used the terms "misunderstandings" and "misinformation" in your question. With all due respect, tattoos were not invented by your generation. They just became fashionable with the general public starting about 20 years ago (about same time as diamond ear studs for men). What us old-experienced people know is that all fashion statements lose their impact once they become common, and sooner or later go away. Except that tramp stamp tattoo won't. Tattoos used to be rebellious - now its just fashion.
To me, elaborate, public tattoos look like a cry for attention (look at me, I am INTERESTING!), but have the opposite effect. As someone smarter than me said, "what old people know and young don't is that Mother Nature and Father Time will decorate you with lines, spots, scars and colors soon enough".

That being said, I have no trouble at all with discreet, tattoos that have a commemorative purpose, like military service. But a teenager with shirt-sleeve tattoos or a Ben Affleck back dragon, makes me sad.

Matt Day
04-03-2018, 3:53 PM
Iím not (yet) of the older generation (38) but Iím a fan of tats for the most part. Ugly and meaningless tattoos seem like a waste of space (literally). I feel like some people get sleeves just to have sleeves.

Iíd have no problem getting one or three, but honestly havenít found that right piece of art that is meaningful and good looking to the eye. Being that Iím ďMr ReseaechĒ as my wife calls me, itíd take a couple years to vet all the tattoo artists within a 100 mile radius before I found one I was happy with!

I used to watch that tv show with Dave Navarro. Fun show and some cool stuff done.

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:00 PM
I would have no clue whether the work was good or terrible. But from being friends with ex-military people who have tattoos, I know that the colors tend to fade and all that's left is the black - because the black doesn't fade.

But let me turn it around and ask you, "Why do you want tattoos?" Is it a statement of some kind? Or a tribe thing? Or what?

Mike


Of course, that is why we get touchups over time. And my artist does that for free, but I still tip.

I'm glad you asked Mike. I get them for many reasons. Heres just a few:
My very first was with a group of friends. We all got the same exact thing, in the same place. We did this because three of them were going off to war, and we had no idea if we'd ever see each other again. Unfortunately one did die. But I'll always have a permanent tribute to him, and to all of us that grew up together, that I can remember him by.
I have a rather large snake on my forearm as well. Same one my father has. We got it together, same day, same artist. He knows my passion for herpetology and we were talking about getting matching tattoos for a while, finally decided on that. We love it!
I also have a quote across my collar bones (that one hurt). It's a quote I feel holds a special place in my heart. A reminder to myself to never live the way I once lived.
I have a semicolon on my hand as well. I suffer from pretty bad depression, and its a pretty common tattoo for people like me, serves as a reminder that life goes on, just as long as you're willing to keep moving forward.
Some are even as simple as album artwork from a band that helped me through tough times, one is from my favorite comic book series.
There are many, many reasons I get tattoos. My body has become a canvas. One that tells many tales of my life, of loved ones, and things I hold dear to me.

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:02 PM
Fair points Marshall. Very fair points. I don't see any issue with that logic at all, sir.

Edwin Santos
04-03-2018, 4:10 PM
I just don't like the look of a heavily tattooed person, male or female. Many times, it's obvious that the person doesn't have a lot of money and I wonder why they wasted so much money on those tattoos.

Mike


Certainly, it's a guess about whether someone you see is wealthy or in poverty. But if they project as being in poverty in their clothes, cleanliness, manners, actions, etc. you tend to assume they're not wealthy.


Mike

I hope you don't actually feel as judgmentally as some of these comments come across. I think the world is a more enlightened place in the absence of judgmental, negative assumptions or as the old timers might say, judging a book by its cover. For all we know, that tatted up person may be considerably wealthier and/or more educated than you or I. I always believe the wealthiest person in the room is often the one nobody would suspect, same with the smartest.

For myself, I tend to think most tattoo aficionados must have no trouble with commitment. Unless things have changed, as far as I know, there is no easy way to get a tattoo removed, especially an elaborate one. So at the very least, it's a long term decision.
So long as it's not an overtly obscene or offensive tattoo and is not hurting anyone else, I say more power to you.

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:11 PM
I'm curious as to why you used the terms "misunderstandings" and "misinformation" in your question. With all due respect, tattoos were not invented by your generation. They just became fashionable with the general public starting about 20 years ago (about same time as diamond ear studs for men). What us old-experienced people know is that all fashion statements lose their impact once they become common, and sooner or later go away. Except that tramp stamp tattoo won't. Tattoos used to be rebellious - now its just fashion.
To me, elaborate, public tattoos look like a cry for attention (look at me, I am INTERESTING!), but have the opposite effect. As someone smarter than me said, "what old people know and young don't is that Mother Nature and Father Time will decorate you with lines, spots, scars and colors soon enough".

That being said, I have no trouble at all with discreet, tattoos that have a commemorative purpose, like military service. But a teenager with shirt-sleeve tattoos or a Ben Affleck back dragon, makes me sad.

You'd have to find the post I mentioned. Not too far back.

I'm well aware they weren't invented by my generation, never once thought that. But virtually everything about tattoos has changed and may continue to change. The process is different now than it was 20 years ago, just like the process 20 years ago is vastly different than how it was 200 years ago.

I'm sorry you feel public tattoos are a cry for attention. I'm sure some are, but I have to say that in most cases, it's simply not the case. It's as simple as asking someone about them. Personally, I enjoy the look. I have blemishy skin that now is covered by quality art.

Now, I completely agree about the teenager thing. I don't understand why the parents would let underage kids do it, or how they even pay for it, stuff is pricey!

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:13 PM
I hope you don't actually feel as judgmentally as some of these comments come across. I think the world is a more enlightened place in the absence of judgmental, negative assumptions or as the old timers might say, judging a book by its cover. For all we know, that tatted up person may be considerably wealthier and/or more educated than you or I. I always believe the wealthiest person in the room is often the one nobody would suspect, same with the smartest.

For myself, I tend to think most tattoo aficionados must have no trouble with commitment. Unless things have changed, as far as I know, there is no easy way to get a tattoo removed, especially an elaborate one. So at the very least, it's a long term decision.
So long as it's not an overtly obscene or offensive tattoo and is not hurting anyone else, I say more power to you.

As long as the commitment isn't to a living thing probably, but commitment issues, especially in my generation, is a whole nother can of worms lol

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:14 PM
Good for you Jim. Happy to hear you have an open mind about it. Times sure do change

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:16 PM
I found that getting the artwork drawn up and hanging it next to like a lightswitch, or anything you see every day, will help ,make the decision. If after a while you ant stand looking at it, well, good thing you didnt tattoo it yet haha

Chase Mueller
04-03-2018, 4:17 PM
But also yes, complete waste of space. Classic example of "i know a guy who can do it cheeeeep"

Edwin Santos
04-03-2018, 4:18 PM
Hi,
One of the best lines I've heard was in a recent thread here, one to to with technology I think. "Every generation thinks it's the last good one".

There was also a great exchange between the young Q and Bond in Skyfall -
Q: Age is no guarantee of efficiency
Bond: And youth is no guarantee of innovation

Edwin

Malcolm Schweizer
04-03-2018, 4:26 PM
My wife has nine of them. I think it's awesome to express yourself in such a permanent way. That said, I have chosen not to. I picked out a tattoo that I wanted to get done on my back- a sailing ship with a very ornate historic compass rose behind it. I had been told to carry the tattoo in your pocket for one year, and if you still like it, then get the tattoo. I still like it, but I just decided not to get it. I'm afraid when I turn 80+ it will start to sag and look like a sinking ship!!!! :D

A woman with a tattoo on her tricep is just sexy. I don't care what anyone else thinks about it. I do remember having to tell my very old-school southern belle mother about Amy's tattoos before she met her. I figure it was best to let her know in advance. Mom didn't say a word, and never has. She absolutely loves Amy. I have never asked what she thought about the tats because I know the answer- she would turn her head slightly to the side, become very southern proper, and say, "Well, it's not something I would choose to do." That would be her way of saying she doesn't like them.

All this being said, there are some tattoos that folks may eventually regret.... or is that "ragret"? 383048

Bryan Lisowski
04-03-2018, 4:45 PM
Never liked anything enough to have it placed on my body permanently. I went with my college roommate the first week of school, he went first and that's all I needed to realize it's not for me. I think some of the work done is tremendous. Who am I to judge what a person wants on their body, they will either be happy with their choice or regret it.

Yonak Hawkins
04-03-2018, 4:48 PM
My wife finds tattoos fascinating and often makes a comment about them to the person. I, however, find them incongruous and out of place. The worst is seeing an otherwise good looking woman with a tattoo showing beneath her evening gown (it's like seeing a fly on a mirror).

I guess that, as you inferred, tattoos are a major investment that must be financially planned for and, even still, after serious consideration, the wearer, seemingly, can't envision far afield and far into the future (such as job prospects). (As an aside, please reconsider terms such as "shotty". Some people may get a mis-impression of the sort of person with which tattoos are associated.)

Marshall Harrison
04-03-2018, 5:12 PM
Of course, that is why we get touchups over time. And my artist does that for free, but I still tip.

I'm glad you asked Mike. I get them for many reasons. Heres just a few:
My very first was with a group of friends. We all got the same exact thing, in the same place. We did this because three of them were going off to war, and we had no idea if we'd ever see each other again. Unfortunately one did die. But I'll always have a permanent tribute to him, and to all of us that grew up together, that I can remember him by.
I have a rather large snake on my forearm as well. Same one my father has. We got it together, same day, same artist. He knows my passion for herpetology and we were talking about getting matching tattoos for a while, finally decided on that. We love it!
I also have a quote across my collar bones (that one hurt). It's a quote I feel holds a special place in my heart. A reminder to myself to never live the way I once lived.
I have a semicolon on my hand as well. I suffer from pretty bad depression, and its a pretty common tattoo for people like me, serves as a reminder that life goes on, just as long as you're willing to keep moving forward.
Some are even as simple as album artwork from a band that helped me through tough times, one is from my favorite comic book series.
There are many, many reasons I get tattoos. My body has become a canvas. One that tells many tales of my life, of loved ones, and things I hold dear to me.

So, you are kind of like a waking totem pole.

I have a brother by another mother that is from the Philippines and he has sleeves that depict his heritage from the islands as well as the States.

I saw a girl at Savanah two weeks ago that had random tattoos on her arms, writs and on each finger. We talked about them and she admitted she like the pain of getting stuck. Once she got started she kept going back for more pain/tats. Not sure if that is healthy or not as she said she no longer feels the pain as she has a high threshold of pain so it can be dangerous for her.

Franklin Ferrier
04-03-2018, 5:26 PM
...... I, however, find them incongruous and out of place. The worst is seeing an otherwise good looking woman with a tattoo showing beneath her evening gown (it's like seeing a fly on a mirror)......


This is the thing I can't understand. Girls in particular are more generally concerned with their appearance than guys and spend heavily on clothes makeup etc, with the specific aim to effect a well balanced esthetic outcome that suites the season. But when it comes to tattoos all that esthetics seems to fly out the window. How many of those girls ask beforehand the equivalent of "is my bum going to look big in this"? Or which frocks and blouses are these tatts going to clash with? Or even if this tatt is going to go with that tatt? I've seen some hideous and outrageous combinations of tatts on otherwise good looking girls. Certainly if I was of dating age, I think most of them would turn me off when the clothes came off and I would be hard pressed to tactfully explain why I had a failure on liftoff!

Jim Becker
04-03-2018, 5:50 PM
All of those things are very subjective, Franklin. It's certainly ok for certain things not to be pleasing to each of us individually, but the next person may feel very different about exactly the same thing.

Frederick Skelly
04-03-2018, 6:12 PM
Chase,
Really good question. Here's one man's take.......

If you enjoy tattoos, God Bless. I'm a believer in live and let live. For myself, when I see a nicely dressed woman showing off a large tattoo, it - just - plain - turns - me - OFF. I mean, right NOW, like a lightswitch. I can't figure out why myself, so I can't explain it to you. But I get a very visceral and emphatic reaction of "No. Thanks anyway. I'd rather be alone." This is especially true when she has (had?) beautiful, clear, soft skin.

I have absolutely NO rational explanation - maybe it's a cave man or tribal thing. I just don't want to touch her. (And I mean that literally, not in any lude manner.)

FWIW.
Fred

Mel Fulks
04-03-2018, 6:47 PM
Looks like the biggest misunderstanding has not been mentioned: "They are not tattoos! They are skin illustrations!"

Mike Cutler
04-03-2018, 7:14 PM
Never was into them myself. Did the Navy thing for six years and never got one. Got close, but I'm glad I didn't.
If you're into them and they're not distasteful, go for it. It's your life and you only get this one shot.

As an aside, and maybe to shed a light on why there is some real need for tattoos. Check out this guy. He is the best in the world at what he does. His clients are from all over the world.
It's kind of sad, that this became his niche, but uplifting and healing at the same time.

http://www.vinniemyersteam.com

Bruce Wrenn
04-03-2018, 9:21 PM
Ever wonder how many jobs WEREN'T offered because of a tattoo? From my childhood, I associate tattoos with drunken sailors. Women what have breast reconstruction sometime get tattoos to add color to the nipple. Lady in our SS class did.

Barry McFadden
04-03-2018, 9:51 PM
With so many young people getting tattoos all over their bodies.... all the different colors and tattoos running into each other... I predict that in 25 - 30 years when their skin starts to age as everyone's does, we are going to have the ugliest generation of seniors that the world has ever seen ..... it will look like Jackson Pollock painted them!!.... https://ca.images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=AwrJ7JIgL8RaXTYAW1nrFAx.;_ylu=X3oDMTE1 OGo4dG5pBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDQ0FDMDAxXzEEc2 VjA3BpdnM-?p=jackson+pollock+paintings&fr=yfp-t-s&fr2=piv-web

Jim Becker
04-03-2018, 10:00 PM
Ever wonder how many jobs WEREN'T offered because of a tattoo?

This is something that's changed quite a bit in today's world, although "how much" certainly comes into play for certain types of occupations. There is a lot more acceptance of body art these days and many employers are not without, either.

Art Mann
04-03-2018, 10:37 PM
I am a volunteer chaplain at a State prison and I know dozens of men who profoundly regret getting tatoos. I will guarantee you that tatoos are an issue for prospective employers. Lives and situations change but tatoos don't. They have wrecked many a man's future.

Yonak Hawkins
04-03-2018, 10:42 PM
..... it will look like Jackson Pollock painted them!!....

Ha ! .. I heard a story the other day of an art professor who showed a slide he said was a Jackson Pollock and asked his art students about why it's important art. They expounded glowingly about "expression", and "inner tumult", and "rebellion". He then revealed it was a picture of his painter's apron.

Ted Calver
04-04-2018, 12:09 AM
Don't have any but love the look of well done tats on anyone. I never let a decent tat influence a hiring decision and don't believe it impacts today's corporate hiring to any significant extent. It goes along with the whole diversity thing. We hired skills, not skin. Granted, no one came to us with facial tattoos, piercings and horns, but if they had an engineering degree and mad computer skills we probably could have found a desk for them.

I do have to admit that a poorly done conspicuous tat sometimes makes me shake my head. One of my daughters has a horrible tat of what is supposed to be a polar bear on her arm. She was born in Alaska, so we could understand the motivation, but that thing is atrocious and she admits the mistake....always wears sleeves to cover it up. If you're going to get a tat make sure the artist is well known and does fantastic work.

Andrew Seemann
04-04-2018, 12:43 AM
I was never a big fan of tattoos, they kind of came in style for people about 5 or so years younger than me (I'm not 50 yet, but getting dangerously close). It seemed like the younger end of Gen X got into them, while I was more of the beginning of Gen X, more straight-laced, uptight 80s, vs grungy 90s. If you are into them, fine, just not my thing. Every once in a while you do see some really neat ones though.

I think my aversion to them comes from two different experiences. The first that was growing up, I worked in a business that had a lot of WWII vets as customers, and I remember seeing the tattoos they had gotten during the war. There was one guy in particular that had a naked woman on his forearm. Setting aside that a picture of a naked woman on someone in their 70s looks kind of out of place, the fact was that the woman on his forearm had aged as badly as he had and also now looked like she was in her 70s. I remember that a lot of those tattoos looked just awful after all those years.

The second was working in a machine shop for 5 years in college and hoping to come home each day with no additional permanent marks, scars, or holes in my body. The idea of having that done willingly just never made sense after that.

Tattoos go in and out of style. The Sherlock Holmes story "The Red Headed League" written in 1891 mentions tattoos, and implies that they were sufficiently common then for Holmes to have published a study of them.

Jason Roehl
04-04-2018, 6:23 AM
Generally, I'm not a fan. I'm pretty ambivalent towards the discrete and tasteful that mostly stay covered, but I see a LOT of the "in your face" garbage--because I work at a courthouse. The previous comments about wealth definitely come into play there. I've talked to several judges who have brought it up in the courtroom because they'll have a young "man" or "woman" in there who can't pay their court costs, attorneys, child support, decent clothing, etc., but they always seem to have money for drugs, tats and piercings.

Curt Harms
04-04-2018, 7:13 AM
[grumpy ol' man]I poke enough holes in myself by accident. I don't need to poke any holes on purpose[/grumpy ol' man]:)

Malcolm Schweizer
04-04-2018, 8:13 AM
I am a volunteer chaplain at a State prison and I know dozens of men who profoundly regret getting tatoos. I will guarantee you that tatoos are an issue for prospective employers. Lives and situations change but tatoos don't. They have wrecked many a man's future.


My wife is a volunteer chaplain at the local prison as well. She also teaches at the university and is getting her PhD. She has 9 tattoos. It all depends on where they are and what they are. Certainly a face tattoo is going to hinder your job search.

Rod Sheridan
04-04-2018, 8:22 AM
I think because I was taught by my parents generation that tattoos were worn by people of a "lower" class. I certainly wasn't born into a family of upper class, my father was a tradesman, and a WWII veteran, however tattoos were certainly something you didn't acquire.

I'm not saying that was correct, it's just what I was taught. Likewise my father would never be seen in public unless well dressed, and wearing a hat such as a fedora, certainly never a baseball cap, see reason above.

I remember working with him as a child, if you had to go to the store while you were working on something, you changed out of your work clothes, and put on pants and a shirt, even if you were going to pick up a bag of cement.

Similarly my father never swore, and in the company of women, or upon entering a building you removed your hat, and of course opened and held doors for them.

I remember once when I was young, we were going into a store, my father held the door open for my mother, and I sauntered in, in front of her.

My Dad's hand hit the right side of my head, the left side bounced off the door, and my father said "Don't ever walk in front of your mother again". You know what? I've never done that again, or walked in front of any woman through a door since.

I think all of the above, including not having tattoos are something that has changed, my youngest daughter has a tattoo down her arm, which she now regrets as she has to wear long sleeve shirts at work......Rod.

Pat Barry
04-04-2018, 8:27 AM
Tatoo's are a demonstration of a masochistic / self-destructive personality. The relationship between the number and magnitude of the tatoos and the degree of the masochistic behavipr is not linear, it is exponential. Anyway, that's the way I see it.

Jim Becker
04-04-2018, 8:30 AM
I think because I was taught by my parents generation that tattoos were worn by people of a "lower" class.

This is what I was kinda tip-toeing around in my original post...and at a point in time, it may have been somewhat true. Fortunately, that's no longer the case.

Phil Mueller
04-04-2018, 8:49 AM
Rod, I was raised the same way. Not to get off topic, but the rare occassion where it is appropriate to walk in front of a woman is a revolving door.

Al Launier
04-04-2018, 9:44 AM
I've never been fond of tattoos, perhaps because I've always felt that a person is who he/she is without any adornment. If someone feels a need to express/portray themselves with tattoos, that is their choice, yet I feel it deflects from their real personality, perhaps a false representation of them, whereas their individuality should stand on its own merits. When I see/meet a person I look at them, especially into their eyes, feel the grip of our handshake, listen to them, talk with them and draw my conclusions based on them not what they are wearing.

My daughter has a small dolphin tattoo on her ankle because she was a certified dolphin trainer at a Hawaiian research lab (KBMML). It is small, inconspicuous, and for her it keeps her in touch with her love of the sea and sea mammals, and her experiences with them. Yet, despite its meaning to her, every time I do see it I think that's OK for her, but not me. I know what she went through, so the tattoo is a realistic symbol of an important part of her life. To me it's similar to my college diploma which I still hang on a wall in my study.

Yesterday I received a shipment from a highly reliable, top end local furniture store. The driver and his assistance were both in their twenties, with radical hairstyles and although not disrespectful, all of their exposed skin (short sleeved shirts with open neck and shorts) were totally covered with tattoos that I couldn't recognize; no words and the graphics were indiscernible as I couldn't tell if they were dragons or goldfish. :confused: Attempting a brief conversation and to thank them for delivering the furniture proved fruitless. They were in and out, not typical of this store. Well, their overall appearance and demeanor was a turn-off for me as my immediate thoughts were that these guys don't represent their employer well. To me impressions do matter.

So Chase, are you a psychoanalyst attempting to develop a thesis or book?

Bill Dufour
04-04-2018, 9:51 AM
At least the crazy haircuts and shaved heads can be changed within a few months. Tattoos are forever until they fade and sag. Or you can always get a lampshade made like the nazi's did.
Bil l

Mike Cary
04-04-2018, 10:07 AM
First, I think the post title is misleading. There is no "misunderstanding" about tattoos. Us old folks (58) know exactly what they are.

But let me address the question. Older people are as diversified as anyone else. They have as many varied opinions as there are stars. But most spend at least a little time reflecting on decisions they made in the past and ponder what might have been. Most judgements they put on younger people come from experience they accumulated over many years. They know the effect of bad choices. They can map out the direction of a young persons life, what challenges they will face and the regrets they will have later with astonishing accuracy. Yes, its not our problem, its the young person's life to succeed or fail as they wish, but that does not make it any easier to watch. Tattoo's have, during my life, been a bad decision. As young people who get tattoos get older this is changing and becoming more acceptable. But still, if I were young and a tattoo might cause me to lose respect, fail to get a job, or lose me a chance at a certain woman, I would not get one. Young people think they must do something to be themselves, unique and special by doing the same thing everyone else is doing. But they are not special or unique. Most are going to live their life as just a common person searching for brief moments of contentment. Sounds sad, but it really isn't, its just life. It is the natural course of events for the youth to distinguish themselves from their elders. We all did it, but bell bottoms and puca shells are not permanent.

Art is subjective. Calling Tattoos "body art" is a little presumptuous to me. Names and sayings are not art anymore than typing a text with a different font is. Most tattoos are cartoons or body graffiti and some are photographic quality images. I wouldn't call 90% of what I see "art". Certainly art is in the eye of the beholder.

This is my objective analysis of feeling about tattoos by older people. I have no personal views that passes judgment on people with tattoos. I do think that the majority of tattoos that I have seen are tackier than golf pants. Question: Would you be caught dead in public wearing knickers?

Art Mann
04-04-2018, 10:14 AM
Body graffiti is an appropriate term for some tattoos. It is unfortunate that the owner has no chance to paint over it when they realize it.

Edwin Santos
04-04-2018, 10:38 AM
This is my objective analysis of feeling about tattoos by older people. I have no personal views that passes judgment on people with tattoos. I do think that the majority of tattoos that I have seen are tackier than golf pants. Question: Would you be caught dead in public wearing knickers?

Objective analysis????

Pretty much everything in your post was purely subjective opinion of your own. Of course you are perfectly entitled to your opinions, but I wouldn't call them objective. I'd call them subjectively yours.

Edwin

Bill Carey
04-04-2018, 10:48 AM
"Art is subjective. Calling Tattoos "body art" is a little presumptuous to me. Names and sayings are not art anymore than typing a text with a different font is."

I think Andy Warhol would disagree with you. But you would both be right. Art is like that.

I'm 70 and have 5 tattoos. All of my kids have more, and so does the LOML. But not for long. I found some art my son did years ago and am in the process of getting it arranged in B&W as a sleeve. I started with a portrait of an old man on the back of my hand. Getting it done partly because I love my son and am proud of his art, partly because it's gonna look cool, partly for ____ and giggles. And I have always wanted a sleeve. Everything we do is permanent. You can change your suit, but if I saw you yesterday in an ugly blue suit, ya can't change that.

Mike Cary
04-04-2018, 11:05 AM
Objective analysis????

Pretty much everything in your post was purely subjective opinion of your own. Of course you are perfectly entitled to your opinions, but I wouldn't call them objective. I'd call them subjectively yours.

Edwin

I visited a nursing home and noticed a lot of CNA's wore what appeared to be bandages. Gauze wraps. I thought there must have been a grease fire explosion or something. When I asked, it was against policy to show and exposed tattoo so they covered them. This tells me, tattoos are not a good choice if you wanted to work there. I've hired many people and do not care if they have tattoos, exposed or not. So it is my objective analysis that tattoos might effect you getting a good job and as such are a bad decision if that is your goal. It is not subjective because it does not effect my hiring practice.

It is my objective opinion that older people in general recognize bad decisions better because they have lived many of them out.

Art cannot be discussed objectively in my opinion because it is by nature subjective.

Edwin Santos
04-04-2018, 12:06 PM
I visited a nursing home and noticed a lot of CNA's wore what appeared to be bandages. Gauze wraps. I thought there must have been a grease fire explosion or something. When I asked, it was against policy to show and exposed tattoo so they covered them. This tells me, tattoos are not a good choice if you wanted to work there. I've hired many people and do not care if they have tattoos, exposed or not. So it is my objective analysis that tattoos might effect you getting a good job and as such are a bad decision if that is your goal. It is not subjective because it does not effect my hiring practice.

It is my objective opinion that older people in general recognize bad decisions better because they have lived many of them out.

Art cannot be discussed objectively in my opinion because it is by nature subjective.

Well it's my objective opinion that the mere notion of an objective opinion is both subjective and oxymoronic; simultaneously.
Edwin

Carlos Alvarez
04-04-2018, 12:08 PM
Tattoos do correlate with criminals, shady people, low income, and generally negative stereotypes. They just do. And I say this as a guy living with a woman who probably has more tattoos than you do. But correlation doesn't mean you have to judge each person just because they have tattoos. I don't really care. That correlation is starting to change in the last couple decades, and tattoos as well as piercing have become a bit more mainstream. Perhaps that's why you find older people to be less accepting of them, because it's a fairly new thing outside of gang/military time. And yet, the demographics STILL correlate with some generally undesirable groups.

I find all tattoos unattractive, and just like saying "I don't find blondes attractive" or whatever, that's my right and something I can't change. It's just not visually attractive to me in any way on any person.

I'm 53, and have only one tiny tattoo. It's the NFC symbol, which is placed right over where I implanted a chip in my hand. Yeah, you read that right. If you want to see older people go nuts, tell someone you have a chip in your hand--on purpose.

Bill Carey
04-04-2018, 12:28 PM
Tattoos do correlate with criminals, shady people, low income, and generally negative stereotypes. They just do. And I say this as a guy living with a woman who probably has more tattoos than you do. But correlation doesn't mean you have to judge each person just because they have tattoos. I don't really care. That correlation is starting to change in the last couple decades, and tattoos as well as piercing have become a bit more mainstream. Perhaps that's why you find older people to be less accepting of them, because it's a fairly new thing outside of gang/military time. And yet, the demographics STILL correlate with some generally undesirable groups.

I find all tattoos unattractive, and just like saying "I don't find blondes attractive" or whatever, that's my right and something I can't change. It's just not visually attractive to me in any way on any person.

I'm 53, and have only one tiny tattoo. It's the NFC symbol, which is placed right over where I implanted a chip in my hand. Yeah, you read that right. If you want to see older people go nuts, tell someone you have a chip in your hand--on purpose.

generally negative stereotypes and older people going nuts. You need to get out more, younster.
What did you get chipped for? Security at work, open doors, blood glucose readings, geocaching? There are some good reasons to get chipped.

Don Orr
04-04-2018, 12:30 PM
I don't really care what people do with their bodies as long as it only affects them and hurts no on else. I will admit to looking somewhat askance at those with extensive tattoos-can't help it. I don't really understand it. I don't have any and never will.
I will however, add a warning to those with extensive brightly colored artwork. If you ever need an MRI exam, which are very common these days, tattoos can actually cause fairly nasty burns due to the metallic components in the inks. It's not common but I have seen it. Piercings are even worse in spite of not being magnetic. Any metal can heat and burn in an MRI magnet.

I will ask a question though. Why get tattoos on your back where you can't even really see it ?

Marshall Harrison
04-04-2018, 12:42 PM
I think because I was taught by my parents generation that tattoos were worn by people of a "lower" class. I certainly wasn't born into a family of upper class, my father was a tradesman, and a WWII veteran, however tattoos were certainly something you didn't acquire.

I'm not saying that was correct, it's just what I was taught. Likewise my father would never be seen in public unless well dressed, and wearing a hat such as a fedora, certainly never a baseball cap, see reason above.

I remember working with him as a child, if you had to go to the store while you were working on something, you changed out of your work clothes, and put on pants and a shirt, even if you were going to pick up a bag of cement.

Similarly my father never swore, and in the company of women, or upon entering a building you removed your hat, and of course opened and held doors for them.

I remember once when I was young, we were going into a store, my father held the door open for my mother, and I sauntered in, in front of her.

My Dad's hand hit the right side of my head, the left side bounced off the door, and my father said "Don't ever walk in front of your mother again". You know what? I've never done that again, or walked in front of any woman through a door since.

I think all of the above, including not having tattoos are something that has changed, my youngest daughter has a tattoo down her arm, which she now regrets as she has to wear long sleeve shirts at work......Rod.

Rod, your Dad sounds a lot like my Dad. I miss him as he has been gone 37 years now. Been thinking more about him this year as I turn 62 in May which is the age he was when he passed away.

Carlos Alvarez
04-04-2018, 12:44 PM
I will ask a question though. Why get tattoos on your back where you can't even really see it ?

I've considered a shoulder-back tattoo of my son's personal logo and gamer avatar, because he died. Why there is hard to say, but I trust you'll understand my general feelings about it. Sometimes you can't explain something but it's still very important.

As to the chip, it opens our home and office doors, the door at a major client's office, unlocks my computer, etc. It's RFID/NFC and programmable. Why? Dunno. I'm a nerd, I've always played with electronics, and I was also sort of poking at the nuts who think the government can track us with chips in our body.

Bill Carey
04-04-2018, 12:52 PM
Sometimes you can't explain something but it's still very important.

ditto that

andy bessette
04-04-2018, 2:46 PM
My 74-year old take is that tattoos seem to be an extreme way of demonstrating self loathing and inadequacy while providing their owners a means of in-your-face thumbing their noses at the natural beauty of divine creation.

Malcolm Schweizer
04-04-2018, 3:26 PM
I have learned a lot from this thread- mostly about stereotypes and discrimination based on those stereotypes.

Mel Fulks
04-04-2018, 3:31 PM
Some good writing and ideas in this thread! Tattoos can be artful and are sometimes used to express an idea or event. Most events fade in importance. If you won't let your 3rd grader get a " Maple Street Elementary Spelling Bee Champ" ...I understand. Most of us have some clothing hanging in the closet that we bought but won't wear. When you don't want to wear a tattoo anymore hanging it in the closet will be painful.

Bob Bouis
04-04-2018, 3:58 PM
I don't even like to punch holes in the drywall to hang things.

Edwin Santos
04-04-2018, 4:59 PM
My 74-year old take is that tattoos seem to be an extreme way of demonstrating self loathing and inadequacy while providing their owners a means of in-your-face thumbing their noses at the natural beauty of divine creation.

So in other words, you're open minded, and you prefer to see the cup as half full? I like that attitude and applaud your embrace of diversity.
Edwin

Jim Becker
04-04-2018, 5:06 PM
I have learned a lot from this thread- mostly about stereotypes and discrimination based on those stereotypes.

Same. Sadly.

Bill Carey
04-04-2018, 5:09 PM
My 74-year old take is that tattoos seem to be an extreme way of demonstrating self loathing and inadequacy while providing their owners a means of in-your-face thumbing their noses at the natural beauty of divine creation.

...how to tell when a thread has gone off the rails...

adios
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