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Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 11:09 AM
So, I have a new Supervisor at work.. again. I notice quite often he does things that the CEO and VP don't approve of, and am wondering where the "line in the sand is" with giving him advice. I don't want to come off as a know-it-all, and most definitely don't want to get off on the wrong foot with him, but I don't wanna see the guy fail either due to simple ignorance. So do I tell him every time I notice he's doing something they don't like, or do I let him find out himself? Because I already feel like I'm micromanaging him in a way, which to me, seems highly inappropriate. But then again, I'm 22 so what do I know? Any advice? What would you do?

glenn bradley
03-29-2018, 11:19 AM
First, everything you say online is available to anyone who knows how to get to it. Second, I would recommend you back off. I would not blatantly stand there while he screws up but, I would hold the commentary based on your views of how things go. He has to make his own way and his boss is where his direction should come from. I get that you don't want to see him fail but, you do not know how he may interpret your "help". I would wait to be asked; the relationship will grow over time.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 11:28 AM
That makes sense. I'm awful at getting people to like me, so minimal interaction is good. If he asks I will gladly offer my .02, but if not I think you got it right, I'll just stay out of it. It just kinda cause of the nature of my job. He's my supervisor essentially only because I'm "technically" in his department, but I'm a one-man operation. He tried getting me to rotate my job the other day, and it lasted about 20min until his boss came out and told him I need to stay at the laser. And that was AFTER I tried telling him I wasn't supposed to rotate. So that went well

Robert Engel
03-29-2018, 11:28 AM
I agree with the previous poster.

If he is smart, as a new guy he will listen to people -- no matter their position -- or he won't last long.

That being said, its kind of hard to watch and not offer advice or help. It can be done with tact, but it all depends on the type of personality he has.

Ken Fitzgerald
03-29-2018, 11:33 AM
I would also be careful about discussing this online where search engines might find your comments. While I have never witnessed it, more than one person claims to have been fired for making online public comments about employers and having them found/viewed by the employers.

That being said, I think Glenn gave you some pretty sage advice.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 11:33 AM
It can be done with tact, but it all depends on the type of personality he has.


That's an issue for me. I can't tell what kinda guy he is. I read into things very heavily, and I don't know if he means to or not, but he contradicts himself in weird ways. I don't wanna leave him for the wolves, cause he is new, and seems nice enough, plus he leaves me the hell alone now which is quite nice, but I'd like to help if I can, I'm just not sure if I'm being a sport about it anymore, or just being micromanagish

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 11:38 AM
I would also be careful about discussing this online where search engines might find your comments. While I have never witnessed it, more than one person claims to have been fired for making public comments about employers.

That being said, I think Glenn gave you some pretty sage advice.

100% agree. That's one of the reasons I'm trying to be careful with my wording. I don't in any way want to seem like I'm bashing him, or bad mouthing the company. I just fail to see how this conversation would go well for me if I tried to bring it up. Doesn't really seem my place.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 11:39 AM
By the way, thank you to everyone who is chiming in, it is greatly appreciated.

Stan Calow
03-29-2018, 12:27 PM
Write things down. Good to have a record of things. not on the computer. Especially when told to do something that is not what was policy. Do you know how the next level of bosses would look at the situation? Sometimes they expect the experienced staff to "break in" the new supervisor. Sometimes they don't. Do you think the new guy's doing this intentionally, or out of lack of knowing? Sometimes a non-critical, carefully worded comment from someone they trust, can alert a smart boss that their direction is not in-line.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 12:46 PM
Do you know how the next level of bosses would look at the situation? Sometimes they expect the experienced staff to "break in" the new supervisor. Sometimes they don't. Do you think the new guy's doing this intentionally, or out of lack of knowing? Sometimes a non-critical, carefully worded comment from someone they trust, can alert a smart boss that their direction is not in-line.

Kind of. A little backstory: My good friend is one of the VP's here. He got me the job. I was hired on specifically to run the epilog which was not even on site yet, nobody at the company knew how it worked aside from him, and even then only the basics. A very new thing for the company. I was given the job mostly because
I knew him, but also cause I knew a little about the way a laser engraver works since I have a friend that owns one. So he definitely trusts me, and he is the boss of the current supervisor. Known the guy for over 4 years.

Now, I can only imagine he isn't doing these things intentionally, it almost has to be pure ignorance of how the company works on a day to day basis. I just don't want to tally up all the things wrong and make it look like I've been focusing too much on it. I've never been put in this situation before so it is very new to me. There's I'm assuming somewhere around a 20 year age gap between me and the new supervisor, and don't quite know how he would take advice from someone who works under him and is much much younger.

Bill Dufour
03-29-2018, 1:04 PM
Consider that maybe he was hired to shake things up and change the way things have always been done here. Just because two years ago this was the way things were done does not mean they are not open to changes today. Also consider the the world economy has changed a lot in the last few years.
It has come out of the great recession when many companies only goal was to survive. Now they are thinking about making a profit and even expanding. Look at how many car companies folded during the previous depression to get a perspective on what has happened in the last ten years, worldwide.
Bill D

Prashun Patel
03-29-2018, 1:09 PM
Be guided by what you think is right for the company and kind to the employee. Donít get caught up in anything more complicated than this.

I own a company of 50 people and the people who last are the people who do the above. Donít worry about your position. If you are coming from a place of kindness the right people will notice and respond. If they donít, you donít belong there.

Mel Fulks
03-29-2018, 1:14 PM
Most likely all of his mistakes are being blamed on you. Record all of them, but hold them until he turns on you.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 1:17 PM
Consider that maybe he was hired to shake things up and change the way things have always been done here. Just because two years ago this was the way things were done does not mean they are not open to changes today. Also consider the the world economy has changed a lot in the last few years.
It has come out of the great recession when many companies only goal was to survive. Now they are thinking about making a profit and even expanding. Look at how many car companies folded during the previous depression to get a perspective on what has happened in the last ten years, worldwide.
Bill D

Totally get that, but in the last 5 years, the company has had steady growth. I have a really good idea on how they would like it to run, and the way things are currently, I'm not convinced he's there yet. I truly hope improvements are made, as he is a nice dude, but he's already made small talk with me about the VP being "Picky with what you do". Referring to me. He thinks I should rotate like everyone else because I know how to use all the machines, and am productive needing no guidance. But doesn't understand the fact that I'm at higher pay grade, and while my job looks easy, and truthfully is, it's much more proficient to keep me here all the time, to ensure consistent quality of what gets lasered, and the fact that a great deal of time would be wasted training everyone else on the machine, greatly impacting production, and having to either give everyone else a raise to match my pay, or reduce mine. And that's more or less from the VP's mouth.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 1:21 PM
Most likely all of his mistakes are being blamed on you. Record all of them, but hold them until he turns on you.


I would hope that's not the case, but solid advice I'm sure. I see things the old supervisor got reprimanded for, but don't want to seem like I'm constantly comparing the two, or trying to boss him around. Very rarely does he interact with me, so I can't imagine there's much to blame on me.. right?

Doug Garson
03-29-2018, 1:46 PM
You seem to think it is a bad idea for you to rotate around on other machines and for others to learn how to use the laser. If you are the only one who can run the laser what happens if you get sick, go on vacation or quit? What happens if there are no orders one week for the laser or it breaks down and is out of service for a week and they need another operator for one of the other machines? Sounds like the new guy may have considered those questions.

Pat Barry
03-29-2018, 2:08 PM
So, I have a new Supervisor at work.. again. I notice quite often he does things that the CEO and VP don't approve of, and am wondering where the "line in the sand is" with giving him advice. I don't want to come off as a know-it-all, and most definitely don't want to get off on the wrong foot with him, but I don't wanna see the guy fail either due to simple ignorance. So do I tell him every time I notice he's doing something they don't like, or do I let him find out himself? Because I already feel like I'm micromanaging him in a way, which to me, seems highly inappropriate. But then again, I'm 22 so what do I know? Any advice? What would you do?
I'd tell you to mind your own ...
He should learn from his boss, not his underling

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 2:13 PM
You seem to think it is a bad idea for you to rotate around on other machines and for others to learn how to use the laser. If you are the only one who can run the laser what happens if you get sick, go on vacation or quit? What happens if there are no orders one week for the laser or it breaks down and is out of service for a week and they need another operator for one of the other machines? Sounds like the new guy may have considered those questions.


Based on the reasoning he told me, he didn't agree that I should be stationary solely because "I was still productive".
I don't think it's a bad idea for others to know how to use it, in fact, I think it would be smart for two or three others to know how, but again, not my decision.
Well, unless I'm contagious, I come to work and stay unless they say I need to leave, I don't like missing days. If I quit, they would have to refer to the multiple word documents I created to show someone what they need to know, and I kept it simple enough that most people should be able to use it just fine. A vacation wouldn't be a problem. Has to be at least two weeks in advance, and even then I don't take more than a day or two at a time, don't really get out much lol. Any custom order that comes through has to be sent to me, and it happens before the order is even placed, so we would know in advance. It's set up that way partly to avoid those instances.
If there are no orders, then I create stock, so I'm always busy.
Now, if it breaks down, I fix it. Part of my job. If I have to wait on parts, I do other stuff while I wait cause then there's really no choice. Or I take the day if it looks like they're struggling to find me something to do.
If they need operators for other machines, that's not my problem I'd say. Hire someone. Just had like 6 new people start recently I believe.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 2:15 PM
I'd tell you to mind your own ...
He should learn from his boss, not his underling

I think that's totally a fair response too. That's why I'm calling it a slight predicament :rolleyes:

Chuck Wintle
03-29-2018, 2:16 PM
So, I have a new Supervisor at work.. again. I notice quite often he does things that the CEO and VP don't approve of, and am wondering where the "line in the sand is" with giving him advice. I don't want to come off as a know-it-all, and most definitely don't want to get off on the wrong foot with him, but I don't wanna see the guy fail either due to simple ignorance. So do I tell him every time I notice he's doing something they don't like, or do I let him find out himself? Because I already feel like I'm micromanaging him in a way, which to me, seems highly inappropriate. But then again, I'm 22 so what do I know? Any advice? What would you do?
I would not stick my nose in his business at, at least if its not requested by him. Let him make the mistakes....remember you did not hire him and you do not pay his salary. Funny thing about trying to help...it can turn into smelly stuff that gets all over you.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 2:22 PM
I would not stick my nose in his business at, at least if its not requested by him. Let him make the mistakes....remember you did not hire him and you do not pay his salary. Funny thing about trying to help...it can turn into smelly stuff that gets all over you.


No kidding. I appreciate the advice given.

Perry Hilbert Jr
03-29-2018, 2:24 PM
When I was 25, I worked at a place for a short time, where the boss was stealing both from other nearby businesses and from the company. Got so I hated the guy. He even stole the lumber for the Santa Claus house for the mall. I knew he could make my life miserable if he wanted to, so I bit my tongue until I could find a job elsewhere and be on that job securely before doing anything. Then I took the evidence I had gathered to the District Attorney's office and turned it into them. I sent copies of the items to the home office of the company at the same time. Came out from work a week later and there the SOB was waiting for me, screaming obscenities and waving a piece of pipe. I got the security guard for my new employer to call the police. The guy ended up doing 18 months on a plea deal for the thefts. I thought I had done everything right and nearly ended up in the hospital or worse.

Chase Mueller
03-29-2018, 2:29 PM
Geeze Perry, that sounds way worse than my situation. Alarming thinking about how many objects so close to me could be used as a deadly weapon. Hope it doesn't ever come to that, would seriously hate to have to put someone down again.

Jim Becker
03-29-2018, 4:09 PM
Everybody's cautions are well stated. Beyond offering to answer any questions he might have about how to do something, etc., I'd also advise being careful. Obviously, safety issues, etc., are always something not to be avoided, but in general, the dude has to sink or swim. Just continue doing the best job you can and yea, if you feel the need, document things privately just in case.

Frederick Skelly
03-29-2018, 5:50 PM
Be guided by what you think is right for the company and kind to the employee. Don’t get caught up in anything more complicated than this.

I own a company of 50 people and the people who last are the people who do the above. Don’t worry about your position. If you are coming from a place of kindness the right people will notice and respond. If they don’t, you don’t belong there.

+1. Absolutely agree.

Chase Mueller
03-30-2018, 8:15 AM
Agreed. I thought about simply sitting down with the VP and making my concerns as crystal as possible, but upon further reflection, probably best I stay out of it as much as I possibly can. Thank you to everyone who chimed in!

Edwin Santos
03-30-2018, 9:08 AM
Agreed. I thought about simply sitting down with the VP and making my concerns as crystal as possible, but upon further reflection, probably best I stay out of it as much as I possibly can. Thank you to everyone who chimed in!
Good for you. Staying out of it as much as possible is the no-lose path for you. Every other path has the potential to backfire.
There are certain high performing companies that have a culture of kindness that encourages 360 degree feedback, but they're rare, very rare, and it is human nature that unsolicited advice from a subordinate, especially one who is considerably younger, is not particularly welcome.
Also, you haven't mentioned how long you've worked there, but if you're only 22 I'd guess it's not that long. If so, it might be smart to give yourself more time and experience to be more certain that your opinions are right, regardless of how smart you obviously are. Sorry if this sounds like age discrimination, but hey, when I was 22 I had opinions about things and later realized my perspective was, to put it politely - less than complete.
The exception would be a safety issue, but it doesn't sound like that's the case here.
Edwin

Chase Mueller
03-30-2018, 9:17 AM
Good for you. Staying out of it as much as possible is the no-lose path for you.
There are certain high performing companies that have a culture of kindness that encourages 360 degree feedback, but they're rare, very rare, and it is human nature that unsolicited advice from a subordinate who is considerably younger is not particularly welcome.
Also, you haven't mentioned how long you've worked there, but if you're only 22 I'd guess it's not that long. If so, it might be smart to give yourself more time and experience to be more certain that your opinions are right. Sorry if this sounds like age discrimination, but hey, when I was 22 I had opinions about things and later realized my perspective was, to put it politely - less than complete.
The exception would be a safety issue, but it doesn't sound like that's the case here.
Edwin

You won't ever find me preaching age discrimination. Ever. I totally admit that I'm by no means an oracle, I don't pretend to know how everything should be running exactly, and I for sure wouldn't want to be in a supervisor position any time soon. I know how young I am, and while I believe I soak up information fairly quick, and welcome new responsibilities at work as often as I can, I still have a lot of learning to do, and I'm sure some growing up, however long that may take haha
No kidding on the human nature part, that's why I typically don't give advice to the older generation, especially at work. I know how it can look/seem, but if they ask, I'm more than happy to give my .o2.

Doug Garson
03-30-2018, 12:23 PM
You won't ever find me preaching age discrimination. Ever. I totally admit that I'm by no means an oracle, I don't pretend to know how everything should be running exactly, and I for sure wouldn't want to be in a supervisor position any time soon. I know how young I am, and while I believe I soak up information fairly quick, and welcome new responsibilities at work as often as I can, I still have a lot of learning to do, and I'm sure some growing up, however long that may take haha
No kidding on the human nature part, that's why I typically don't give advice to the older generation, especially at work. I know how it can look/seem, but if they ask, I'm more than happy to give my .o2.
Sounds like a very mature attitude.

Chase Mueller
03-30-2018, 12:47 PM
I appreciate that Doug