PDA

View Full Version : Weight for use when gluing



Mike Henderson
06-19-2016, 11:35 PM
I have a cylinder of lead that I occasionally use when I have to glue up something and can't get a clamp on it. It's 13.5 pounds. It's very useful so I'm always on the lookout for other items that I could use the same way.
339487

The other day, I went to a garage sale and found a heavy antique clothes iron. Turns out, it's 14.5 pounds. Our ancestors must have had some well developed arm muscles to use that. It was rusty but I soaked it in Evaporust and it came out pretty good. Cost $8.
339486

I also like that it has a flat bottom so if I use it to press a section of veneer (such as when you have a bubble), it presses the whole area flat.

Just wanted to pass this along to anyone else who encounters one of those old clothes irons in a yard sale. They can be really useful.

Mike

[Of course, put something like plastic or waxed paper between the wood and the iron to avoid staining.]

Bert Kemp
06-20-2016, 12:13 AM
Wow 14# huh those women must have good biceps:D

Mel Fulks
06-20-2016, 12:28 AM
I've seen a bunch of those and have a couple, but never heard of one that heavy before!

Wayne Lomman
06-20-2016, 2:34 AM
I have never heard of one this heavy either. Sounds like something they made convicts use.

Mike Cutler
06-20-2016, 5:56 AM
Wow, 14.5 pounds!
I've seen a lot of those around, but never that heavy.

Matt Day
06-20-2016, 7:45 AM
A readily accessible weight is water, a gallon of which is over 8 pounds.

Bradley Gray
06-20-2016, 9:04 AM
harpsicord makers use a"go bar deck (https://www.google.com/search?q=go+bar+deck+&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8)" - springy hickory strips to clamp soundboard bracing. I have bars about 7' long that work from the ceiling to my bench tops. This makes it easy to add pressure in the middle of a panel.

Mike Henderson
06-20-2016, 9:46 AM
Wow, 14.5 pounds!
I've seen a lot of those around, but never that heavy.
Yeah, I had never seen one that heavy before, either. I weighed it on two scales just to make sure the weight was correct. I don't know why no one had bought it - I wasn't first to the sale. But when I felt the weight, I knew it had to go home with me.

And thanks to Matt and Bradley for the other suggestions.

Mike

Mel Fulks
06-20-2016, 11:33 AM
Maybe it was an overly ambitious failed attempt to get girls interested in "shot put"

Yonak Hawkins
06-20-2016, 11:44 AM
I have a box of brake rotors from when I had to replace them on a former vehicle one time. 12" X 12" X 5-1/2", 35 lbs.

Mike Henderson
06-20-2016, 2:04 PM
I have a box of brake rotors from when I had to replace them on a former vehicle one time. 12" X 12" X 5-1/2", 35 lbs.
That's a good idea. Never thought of that. Thanks!

You could get a wide press one way and a more narrow press the other way, depending on which side you put down.

Mike

Yonak Hawkins
06-20-2016, 5:13 PM
There are three rotors. Sometimes I'll take them out of the box when I really want to spread out the weight. I also have sheets of 1/4" steel and of 3/4" aluminum to put weights on when I have a wide area and want even weight over all.

Frederick Skelly
06-20-2016, 8:10 PM
Another idea FWIW: I sometimes use 1 gallon buckets of latex paint that I have stored.
Fred

Caspar Hauser
06-21-2016, 7:47 AM
A readily accessible weight is water, a gallon of which is over 8 pounds.

Surely a gallon of water weighs 10lbs.

"A pint of pure water weighs a pound and a quarter".

;)

glenn bradley
06-21-2016, 8:15 AM
While wandering the yard sales watch for barbells that others have bought but hardly used; they come cheap. I have a number of 10 pound plates that I use for pressure situations as Mike describes. they stack neatly under the foot of the bench or wherever you have a bit of space to tuck them. Great thread subject Mike. Stimulated a lot of good conversation about this.

John Stankus
06-21-2016, 1:28 PM
Surely a gallon of water weighs 10lbs.

"A pint of pure water weighs a pound and a quarter".

;)

Depending on the temperature the weight of a gallon of pure liquid water at atmospheric pressure varies from about 8.34 lbs/gal near the freezing point down to just under 8 lbs/gal just below the boiling point.

Reminds me of an interesting point; the gas pumps in Canada are temperature compensated, the gas pumps in the US are not. If you have an uncompensated pump and the temperature is lower than standard it favors the consumer, if the temperature is higher it favors the seller. (it's one of those things that make you want to go hmmmm!?! with apologies to Arsenio)

John (Physical Chemist in day job)

Stew Hagerty
06-21-2016, 2:33 PM
I have a couple of 8" Diameter "cores", 12" long, from a concrete wall at one of my jobsites years ago. I used to put one behind each wheel, in the trunk of my daughter's car in the winter for a little extra weight.

Caspar Hauser
06-21-2016, 3:15 PM
John, I was being playful.

Not all gallons are created equal.

A U.S. gallon is 3.785 litres, an Imperial gallon is 4.546 litres and was infact, if memory serves, once defined as 10lbs of freshwater at 62f.

Caspar (The guy at the bar wondering where the rest of his pint is)

John Stankus
06-21-2016, 5:05 PM
John, I was being playful.

Not all gallons are created equal.

A U.S. gallon is 3.785 litres, an Imperial gallon is 4.546 litres and was infact, if memory serves, once defined as 10lbs of freshwater at 62f.

Caspar (The guy at the bar wondering where the rest of his pint is)

No worries -- I had to think a bit to get to common units from the metric which is so much easier.

John