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Jacob John
12-11-2015, 2:37 PM
So I searched the forums and found discussions about suppliers, etc. but nothing addressing the smudging. I was requested to burn some cork products, and while they look absolutely stunning, they easily smudge, ultimately looking like hot garbage.

Anyone have any tips on sealing the ash in?

Thanks!

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 3:04 PM
Just as an update, some fishing forums talk about sealing their rod handles with spray on lacquer or a clear acrylic spray. Any thoughts on that? It just needs to keep the dark engraving in place.

Bill George
12-11-2015, 6:01 PM
Just as an update, some fishing forums talk about sealing their rod handles with spray on lacquer or a clear acrylic spray. Any thoughts on that? It just needs to keep the dark engraving in place.

I use clear spray lacquer, the RustOleum brand, dries in about 5 minutes, might need more than one coat. I did try washing mine with soap and water... the lacquer works better. I make my own cork coasters, engrave and then vector cut.

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 6:58 PM
I use clear spray lacquer, the RustOleum brand, dries in about 5 minutes, might need more than one coat. I did try washing mine with soap and water... the lacquer works better. I make my own cork coasters, engrave and then vector cut.

Good deal, and thanks! I'll definitely be picking some of that up this evening. Any idea how heat resistant it is? Some of the requests have been for pot pads as well. I'm not sure how hot a pot gets, but I'm not sure the very thin layer of lacquer would be affected.

EDIT- Found this on the Rustoleum SDS - "CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Avoid temperatures above 120 F". Well, back to the drawing board I guess.

Lee DeRaud
12-11-2015, 7:06 PM
EDIT- Found this on the Rustoleum SDS - "CONDITIONS TO AVOID: Avoid temperatures above 120 F".Yes, but is that for the cured finish, or the product in its aerosol can?

Bill George
12-11-2015, 7:07 PM
Try washing off with soap and water, I don't think you will find anything for high temperature. My guess Lee that is for the can contents. The only way to find out is spray a test one and see what happens? Soap and water takes a lot of the black off.

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 7:09 PM
Yes, but is that for the cured finish, or the product in its aerosol can?


It's listed under this section:

"10. Stability and ReactivityCONDITIONS TO AVOID: Avoid temperatures above 120 F. Avoid contact with strong acid and strong bases. Avoid all possiblesources of ignition."

Not sure, honestly. Hmmm

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 7:09 PM
Try washing off with soap and water, I don't think you will find anything for high temperature. My guess Lee that is for the can contents. The only way to find out is spray a test one and see what happens? Soap and water takes a lot of the black off.


I'll try that too, Bill. That would be an easy fix.

Kev Williams
12-11-2015, 10:38 PM
Yes, but is that for the cured finish, or the product in its aerosol can?

It's listed under this section:

"10. Stability and ReactivityCONDITIONS TO AVOID: Avoid temperatures above 120 F. Avoid contact with strong acid and strong bases. Avoid all possiblesources of ignition."

Not sure, honestly. Hmmm

These are storage and use precautions. Cans can burst above 120, I suppose strong acid and bases can cause spontaneous problems, and cured paint isn't particularly prone to catching fire...

FWIW, you might try Rustoleum matte clear enamel, the matte finish works great when you don't want gloss, and would probably work well with cork-

Steven Cox
12-11-2015, 10:41 PM
I've done Cork coasters myself, tried clear lacquer/varnish but being cork it tended to suck it up and was dificult to get an even finish. In the end I just brushed off as much dust as possible and gave them a light spray with Olive Cooking Oil.

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 10:46 PM
I feel really stupid because soap and water appears to have worked. In my defense, I've never worked with cork. It ashes a ton more than any other item I've worked with. :)

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 10:49 PM
These are storage and use precautions. Cans can burst above 120, I suppose strong acid and bases can cause spontaneous problems, and cured paint isn't particularly prone to catching fire...

FWIW, you might try Rustoleum matte clear enamel, the matte finish works great when you don't want gloss, and would probably work well with cork-

Even though soap and water seems to have worked, I might experiment with it just to see how it comes out. Might not be a bad idea and offers additional protection.

Bert Kemp
12-11-2015, 10:50 PM
I wonder how sealing them first then laser and clean.

Jacob John
12-11-2015, 10:58 PM
I wonder how sealing them first then laser and clean.

I'll try that too. No harm in experimenting.

Steven Cox
12-11-2015, 11:01 PM
I should have pointed out that I only engraved cork & never cut it. I'd buy the cork from the $2 shops in packets of 4 or more round or square coasters and also larger ones about the size of a bread plate in packets of 2 or more. My biggest seller was the "Great Aussie Dartboard" that featured a Koala doing a brown eye.

Bill George
12-12-2015, 9:52 AM
I can go to Menards a local Midwest large home improvement store and purchase a package of 4 12x12 inch cork tile or whatever you want to call it for $6. I can engrave and cut 6 100 mm diameter coasters from each 12 inch cork piece. That works out to about 25 cents each and no fussing with alignment for each coaster. They are about 5 mm thick and I use 300x300 mm for my layout box in Corel and it gives me a little fudge factor. I do give them a light spray before engraving / cutting.

Matt McCoy
12-12-2015, 11:36 AM
Jacob: Can you lower your power? Simply use an air compressor to blow off any residue.

Henri Sallinen
12-14-2015, 5:10 AM
If you play with the settings, the smudging will be minimal. Just a simple cleaning with paper/cloth will suffice and it will take the excess black off without leaving any marks. Usually the smudging happens because the engraving power is too high.