PDA

View Full Version : WiFi router question



Fred Belknap
12-11-2015, 8:56 AM
I am having problems with my old Linksys router. I have to reboot it several times a week to keep it working. I have a desk top, i-pad and a Notebook. Sometimes I connect a cell phone but rarely as I don't have cell service here at the house. My only option is a satellite dish for internet connection. My present router won't reach the shop. I would like a stronger router that is easy to set up. I looked at the Goggle Hub but it seems to require an app download to set it up and that won't work without cell service. I tried a booster but never could get it to recognize my router so I took it back. It may be my computer or the security set up, I'm not very literate when it comes to computers, we don't speak the same language.

George Bokros
12-11-2015, 9:09 AM
I believe you could use a wireless booster to extend the range of the existing wireless range.

Pat Barry
12-11-2015, 9:15 AM
I had issues a few months ago with my centurylink dsl. I needed to reboot a lot, sometimes a couple times a day. Very frustrating. The ookla speedtest showed I had good speeds but it took a while to get the test completed. As it turned out I had a phone line connection issue at the phone plug I was using. I actually had centurylink come to my house and he identified the issue as the connection. He fixed that and instantly problem solved - didn't need a new router at all.

Kent Adams
12-11-2015, 9:36 AM
You could try an Apple airport. However, they are expensive compared to some others but the range is very good. What is the range you're looking for? How far away is the shop?

Matt Marsh
12-11-2015, 9:37 AM
I was having the same issues with my old router last winter (same brand as yours). I had to reboot it several times a week, and most of the time it took several attempts to get it to come back up. I also have a range extender in my garage to boost the range so I had sufficient signal in my shop next door. Last spring I purchased a WiFi security camera. It would not connect, even with the help of the camera manufacturer's telephone tech support. A call to tech support resulted in them wanting me to spend something like $80 to "fix" the issue. Instead, I bought a new/better different brand router with three external rubber ducky antennas. What an unbelievable difference! I don't even use the range extender anymore, and I have never had to reboot once since.

roger wiegand
12-11-2015, 9:58 AM
New wireless routes are much better than older ones for speed, security, and range and the prices have continued to plummet, so I'd strongly consider a new router and, if needed, a range extender from the same manufacturer. If your devices work on the 5 Ghz signal a dual band router might help-- there can be a lot of interference and other traffic on the 2.4 Ghz band. If you can run a wire out to your shop and set up a wired extender that's the most reliable solution.

Mike Null
12-11-2015, 10:03 AM
I bought a Net Gear router and extender which has eliminated my router issues.

Steve Wurster
12-11-2015, 11:50 AM
New wireless routes are much better than older ones for speed, security, and range and the prices have continued to plummet, so I'd strongly consider a new router and, if needed, a range extender from the same manufacturer. If your devices work on the 5 Ghz signal a dual band router might help-- there can be a lot of interference and other traffic on the 2.4 Ghz band. If you can run a wire out to your shop and set up a wired extender that's the most reliable solution.

+1 to using a new router. I went from an older Linksys N-based router to a Linksys 1900AC router and the range / reliability increased a lot. And this was without having any devices in the house that used AC (at that time, anyway; I've since added AC devices).

Todd Mason-Darnell
12-11-2015, 11:54 AM
Time for a new router

Ole Anderson
12-11-2015, 1:23 PM
I have gotten so frustrated with my WiFi I installed CAT 5 cables wherever I could.

Larry Browning
12-11-2015, 3:11 PM
+1 to what others have said. You need a new router. Don't be tempted by those cheap $30 routers, spend just a little more and get something that just works.
I am a big fan of the ASUS routers I have this one:
http://www.amazon.com/RT-N66U-Dual-Band-Wireless-N900-Gigabit-Router/dp/B006QB1RPY/ref=sr_1_2?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1449860292&sr=1-2&keywords=asus+router
I think if I was buying today I would get this one for just a little more:
http://www.amazon.com/RT-AC66U-Dual-Band-Wireless-AC1750-Gigabit-Router/dp/B008ABOJKS/ref=dp_ob_title_ce
Also, If your shop is on the same electric meter as the house you might want to look into setting up a power line network using these:
http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Gigabit-Adapter-Starter/dp/B00MUVFOH6/ref=sr_1_7?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1449860771&sr=1-7&keywords=zyxel+powerline+network

You could then add a wireless access point to the one in the shop and you'd be all set!
(http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Gigabit-Adapter-Starter/dp/B00MUVFOH6/ref=sr_1_7?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1449860771&sr=1-7&keywords=zyxel+powerline+network)

Scott Donley
12-11-2015, 4:50 PM
I have the same one as Larry ( per his advice ) very easy setup and good coverage, I live in a 4 bedroom tri level and covers all of it and out to my deck. Has been trouble free, I like it.

Matt Marsh
12-11-2015, 5:14 PM
I bought the same one Larry. I'm very pleased with it, and it seems handle my ever increasing demand without a glitch. It's connected to two Bowers and Wilkins speakers, three Honeywell smart thermostats, a Rheem smart water heater, laptop, two iPhones, two iPads, a Samsung smart TV, and one (soon 2) security camera.

David Helm
12-11-2015, 7:47 PM
I will fourth the Asus advice. I replaced my Net Gear router and Net Gear range extender with the Asus AC 2400 wireless gigabit router. It has to reach two outbuildings, each 100 + feet from the router and does so with relative ease. It is more expensive than the Net Gear but not ridiculously so. Just sayin' routers don't last forever.

Art Mann
12-11-2015, 8:08 PM
I tried a simple wireless range extender from Netgear installed at a distance about half way between my router and my detached shop 150 feet away. It simply did not extend the covereage far enough to be reliable. As a result, I returned it and installed an ethernet over power line interface at the router and a remote extender in the shop. It was this one.

http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-WPA4220KIT-ADVANCED-Powerline-Extender/dp/B00HSQAIQU/ref=sr_1_10?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1449878107&sr=1-10&keywords=powerline+ethernet+adapter

I chose it because it provides both a wired and a WiFi connection. It works very well but the controller on my CNC router knocks out the signal when it is in operation. I can live with that.

Fred Belknap
12-11-2015, 9:00 PM
Thanks for the advice. I took Larrys advice and put AC66U in my cart. Can it be set up without a cell phone???????

Jim Becker
12-13-2015, 9:13 PM
In addition to considering updating your wireless router to something more contemporary and capable, you can also put a second AP in your shop by using PowerLine extenders. For utility, that could simply be your old router reconfigured to just be a wireless access point. I have to use multiple AP's in my home due to multiple factors. Relative to your wireless (cell) phone, major carriers offer MicroCells that you can put in your home and they use your broadband service to backhaul your phone to their network. Further, the major carriers are also not supporting WiFi calling, at least on many of the latest phone models/versions. For the same reasons that I need multiple APs for wireless networking in our home, I need to use a MicroCell for cell service inside, too.

Larry Browning
12-14-2015, 3:24 PM
Thanks for the advice. I took Larrys advice and put AC66U in my cart. Can it be set up without a cell phone???????
Fred,
You will not be sorry you got this router!
I am not sure how to answer your question. Setting up this router has nothing to do with your cell phone. You would first replace your existing router with the new one by unplugging the network cables from the old one and plugging them into the same plug on the new one. It would be easiest to hard wire one of the 4 lan ports on the router directly to your PC and then follow the instructions to connect to the new router using the browser on your PC. The IP address is normally 192.168.1.1.(it might be different, you need to refer to the documentation that comes with the router) You would type that into the web address box of your browser (instead of www.sawmillcreek.org (http://www.sawmillcreek.org)) That should bring up the router's logon page. All of this should be in the "Getting Started" sheet that comes with the router. After you get it set up you should be able to connect your cell phone to it. But a cell phone is not needed or even recommended to set up your new router.

Or maybe I simply misunderstood the question.

Curt Harms
12-15-2015, 10:23 AM
Here's something else to keep in mind. All routers from the same manufacturer used to come with the same default user name and password. If you needed to reset to factory defaults, you could google the router model and find the default user name and password. I hope that is no longer the case, it was a huge potential security flaw. Routers from Verizon and I hope others now come with unique user names and passwords. Don't lose those. If you have to do a factory reset you'll need them. If there isn't one already maybe write them on a sticker and stick it on the bottom or some place inconspicuous.

Ole Anderson
12-16-2015, 2:03 AM
The last couple of routers I worked with had the username and password printed on the bottom next to the mac address. Appeared to be at least a unique password, very long.

Curt Harms
12-16-2015, 9:56 AM
The last couple of routers I worked with had the username and password printed on the bottom next to the mac address. Appeared to be at least a unique password, very long.


That's how it should be. That and disabling all remote administration go a long way toward thwarting attacks on SOHO(small office home office) routers.

Robert Engel
12-16-2015, 11:03 AM
Is is the router or is your service interrupting?

I tried a repeater/range extender which was supposed to have a 450' range. Very dissapointed in results going about 100' from house to barn.

Ended up running cable to barn and installing a second wireless works great now.

Art Mann
12-16-2015, 12:48 PM
The power line extender set I used and linked to previously provides two wired connections plus a WiFi access point in the shop with no other hardware necessary. Judging from the cost of competing brands, the wireless feature doesn't cost extra. I have never used the wired connections in the shop except to just verify they worked.


In addition to considering updating your wireless router to something more contemporary and capable, you can also put a second AP in your shop by using PowerLine extenders. For utility, that could simply be your old router reconfigured to just be a wireless access point. I have to use multiple AP's in my home due to multiple factors. Relative to your wireless (cell) phone, major carriers offer MicroCells that you can put in your home and they use your broadband service to backhaul your phone to their network. Further, the major carriers are also not supporting WiFi calling, at least on many of the latest phone models/versions. For the same reasons that I need multiple APs for wireless networking in our home, I need to use a MicroCell for cell service inside, too.

Scott Shepherd
12-16-2015, 1:06 PM
I've said this on a number of previous threads, but I had one with issues, I installed DD-WRT on it, which wipes out the factory firmware and replaces it. You can then change the signal strength on it as well. That router is still running several years after I was about to throw it in the trash. Plus I have a LOT more control over things with it.

Greg R Bradley
12-16-2015, 1:13 PM
I've said this on a number of previous threads, but I had one with issues, I installed DD-WRT on it, which wipes out the factory firmware and replaces it. You can then change the signal strength on it as well. That router is still running several years after I was about to throw it in the trash. Plus I have a LOT more control over things with it.
Isn't this typical when someone has made up their mind they need to buy something. Sometimes the challenge is figuring out what to buy instead of making what you have work.

I keep hearing people tell me "I need a new computer". I keep saying "No you don't, you just need to stop downloading useless junk and particularly stop looking for really damaging junk designed to improve your computer".

Dan Hintz
12-17-2015, 9:08 AM
I keep hearing people tell me "I need a new computer". I keep saying "No you don't, you just need to stop downloading useless junk and particularly stop looking for really damaging junk designed to improve your computer".

Bit of a pet peeve of mine. Computer X was working just fine when you bought it and was plenty fast. Three years later it has slowed to a crawl, so the obvious answer is "It's old and useless, time to buy another computer!". No, you're still running the same software as three years ago, so it's just junk causing issues. Clean everything up (start with a fresh install, if you have to) and get back to what you were happy with before. Save the money. Buy a new system when HARDWARE breaks.

Curt Harms
12-17-2015, 11:02 AM
I've said this on a number of previous threads, but I had one with issues, I installed DD-WRT on it, which wipes out the factory firmware and replaces it. You can then change the signal strength on it as well. That router is still running several years after I was about to throw it in the trash. Plus I have a LOT more control over things with it.


3rd party firmwares are very useful and likely more secure than older unsupported factory firmware. They're not for the tech-phobic though. I have no clue what 90% of the functions do.

Dave Lehnert
12-17-2015, 10:51 PM
FYI - Check with your ISP and see if they provide a router at no cost.