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George Bokros
11-09-2015, 1:31 PM
I am fairly certain there was a thread about this and I searched and was not able to find it.

What is a good electric knife sharpener for kitchen knives and perhaps scissors?

Thanks

John T Barker
11-09-2015, 1:41 PM
Do you mind if I ask why electric?

Peter Kelly
11-09-2015, 2:09 PM
I've tried several and found the 1" grinder & Trizac belts to be the best method. Those small kitchen knife grinders such as the Chef's Choice one work ok with thinner stamped blades but seem to struggle with heavier forged ones.

Takes a bit of practice but is pretty straightforward once you get the hang of it.

Great grinder: http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=505-1371&PMPXNO=952569



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptspof6CXOg

Matt Meiser
11-09-2015, 2:43 PM
I have the Worksharp one that uses small sanding belts. Works great and is nearly foolproof.

Dennis Peacock
11-09-2015, 2:45 PM
Well, it's not "electric" but I bought this setup about 15 years ago and still use it today.
https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=77

Works really well and once you sharpen the first time, every time after that is very quick to "touch up".
Still using the exact same stones today that came in the kit.

Shawn Pachlhofer
11-09-2015, 3:12 PM
I don't use any electric sharpeners on any of my knives.

I use a Lansky manual sharpener, and then keep them honed with s steel.

Ian Moone
11-09-2015, 8:46 PM
Sadly a LOT of these nice tools, that are affordable priced even - we can't use here down under coz our power supply is 240V AC not 110V!

I still find it frustrating - because I see so many nifty tools like this!

Just shows me what I can't have all the time!.

Rich Engelhardt
11-10-2015, 8:50 AM
Sadly a LOT of these nice tools, that are affordable priced even - we can't use here down under coz our power supply is 240V AC not 110V!You should be able to get a step down transformer so you can step down to 110V pretty easy.


Also +1 to the Spyderco Sharpmaker.
Once the knives are sharp it just takes a couple swipes to bring them back.

Honestly though - the past two years I've gone to using ceramic blades for nearly everything.
Ceramic never seem to dull.

The lone exceptions are small paring knives. My wife picks them up in a three pack at Marc's or the Dollar Store for a buck or two.
When they dull, which is pretty quick, a few swipes on the Spyderco brings them right back to razor sharp.

Curt Harms
11-11-2015, 9:39 AM
I've tried several and found the 1" grinder & Trizac belts to be the best method. Those small kitchen knife grinders such as the Chef's Choice one work ok with thinner stamped blades but seem to struggle with heavier forged ones.

Takes a bit of practice but is pretty straightforward once you get the hang of it.

Great grinder: http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=505-1371&PMPXNO=952569



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptspof6CXOg


Yup, one of those. I found it easier though to though to lay the sander on its back and hold it in position with a hand screw. The belt is horizontal and moving away from me. It just feels easier to hold the knife in position.

Jim Becker
11-13-2015, 9:06 PM
Well, it's not "electric" but I bought this setup about 15 years ago and still use it today.
https://www.spyderco.com/catalog/details.php?product=77

Works really well and once you sharpen the first time, every time after that is very quick to "touch up".
Still using the exact same stones today that came in the kit.

Dennis, I get an "unsafe" warning when I try to go to that link. (via Chrome on MacOS El Capitan)