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View Full Version : Who is insane here?



Wade Lippman
06-20-2015, 11:23 AM
It was cold last night, so the house is 70*. The A/C is set at 73*.

I come home from walking the dog. It was a very sticky 83* outside. My wife has windows open to let the fresh air in.
As I see it, she is letting 83* humid air in, which is about the last thing I would want to do.
She has no idea what I am upset about; what do I have against fresh air. Nothing, I was just outside for an hour; try it.

So, who is insane.

Dave Richards
06-20-2015, 11:32 AM
Careful.:D

John Coloccia
06-20-2015, 11:32 AM
If it were up to me, my house would be hermetically sealed and about 65 year round.

I hope your wife doesn't read SMC, BTW, or we'll be reading threads like:

"Anyone have plans for a big...BIG....doghouse?"
"How hard is it to run plumbing to a shed?"
"Woodworking in your car - dust collector filters or exhaust outside?"
etc etc

Ken Fitzgerald
06-20-2015, 11:34 AM
In as much as this discussion happens too frequently in my home, I don't know the answer.:confused:

However, the last week we have not used the air conditioner in an effort to assist speeding up the drying of the sheetrock mud and texture material on our kitchen addition/remodel.

The temperatures have been in the low 90's F but it's a "dry heat" as our relative humidity has been averaging 24%.:D

Erik Loza
06-20-2015, 11:36 AM
Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days. IWF in Atlanta is never really more than 75-80 degrees inside the convention center but it's the South and very humid, so you feel about 10X more tired than you do in Vegas, which is 5-10 degrees warmer but has no humidity. The humidity makes a big difference.

Erik

Jason Beam
06-20-2015, 11:58 AM
Happy wife = happy life.

Bruce Page
06-20-2015, 12:04 PM
Did she turn off the AC before opening the windows?
Luckily my wife is good at keeping the house closed up when the AC is on. My problem is we have a couple of rooms that we don't use and we keep them closed up. For the life of me if my wife goes into one of them she cannot close the door behind her when she leaves. I think she does it on purpose just to drive me nuts!

Mike Henderson
06-20-2015, 12:40 PM
If it were up to me, my house would be hermetically sealed and about 65 year round.

Me too. At night, my wife has a pile of blankets on her side of the bed and I have a sheet. And it's between 71-73 in the bedroom. When I used to travel a lot, I'd turn the AC in the hotel room down as far as it would go and then put a blanket on the bed. I'd sleep like a baby.

Mike

Malcolm Schweizer
06-20-2015, 4:11 PM
Median temp in my house is about 85F. Summer here gets mid 90'sF and winter mid 70's at night. We have A/C but never use it except when friends visit from afar because if not, they complain how hot it is. I am not being cynical, but I am amazed at how people feel the need to keep their homes 68 deg in summer and crank up the heat in winter. Our bodies acclimate if we just let them. I wear a business suit in 88F weather and don't sweat a drop.

When we went to Peru we stayed with Quechuan Indians who used no heat at 32F and we had to take showers in literally freezing temps with no hot water. I have to say, that was probably my limit, but it showed me how the body can acclimate. Yes, by the way, I screamed like a girl and took the shortest showers ever; let me tell no lies. Arriving home and stepping off the plane felt like entering a sauna, but a day later we were back to normal.

As I type, the house is 85F. I am wearing long pants, long sleeve linen shirt, and just awoke from a nap where I was covered with a blanket in the same clothing. It's all about acclimating.

Kent A Bathurst
06-20-2015, 4:38 PM
A fella has to pick his battles carefully.....you can win a few, but, ultimately, you pay for each victory.

My point?

I can't believe you picked this one as a "must win".

You should reconsider your strategy...if this is a strategic issue, then your tactics are fine.

David Ragan
06-20-2015, 5:01 PM
Our house is routinely 68-69*

Plus, Sears largest window unit in Master BR. Blankets are good.

When I was a kid, all we had was an attic fan, out in Tulsa. That fan was great @ night, just position the bed by the window, and good night.

Lots of folks in more temperate climates never use A/C.

Wade Lippman
06-20-2015, 5:07 PM
Median temp in my house is about 85F. Summer here gets mid 90'sF and winter mid 70's at night. We have A/C but never use it except when friends visit from afar because if not, they complain how hot it is. I am not being cynical, but I am amazed at how people feel the need to keep their homes 68 deg in summer and crank up the heat in winter. Our bodies acclimate if we just let them. I wear a business suit in 88F weather and don't sweat a drop.
Probably true, but only because your January temperatures are also in the 80s. We get below 0 in the winter and the body can't adjust to both. I spent many summers without any A/C and never got used to the heat.


Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days.

I set a show up in Chicago one August when it was in the 90s. Must have been 120 in the hall. Geez.


Did she turn off the AC before opening the windows?

This time it was off because I turned it off a couple days ago, but I am sure she didn't look. She will also open windows when it is 60 outside with the heat on.


I can't believe you picked this one as a "must win".

Yeah, I hear you.

Perry Holbrook
06-20-2015, 5:08 PM
Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days. IWF in Atlanta is never really more than 75-80 degrees inside the convention center but it's the South and very humid, so you feel about 10X more tired than you do in Vegas, which is 5-10 degrees warmer but has no humidity. The humidity makes a big difference.

Erik

Erik, I was in Vegas the first week of the month setting up a show at the convention center, 105 F about every day, close to 90 in the hall. Two years ago we set up in the parking lot in front of central hall in early Sept. around 120 F on the pavement. Don't you just love setting up in Vegas in the summer!

Perry

Steve Kinnaird
06-20-2015, 5:18 PM
Will be married for 38 yrs next month..... So, my answer to the wife would be "Great Idea!"
While knowing that is makes no sense :D

Bert Kemp
06-20-2015, 5:59 PM
Humidity makes the difference is RIGHT! Temp here the last few days has been above 110f and yet you can still go outside if you stay out of the sun and its not to bad, in the evening when it drops down to 100 you can go out and do yard work or go for a walk. Right now its 111 outside and the humidity is 6% not to bad but if it were to rain the temp would drop to 80/85 but you wouldn't be able to move at all you'd die with the humidity up over 60%.


Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days. IWF in Atlanta is never really more than 75-80 degrees inside the convention center but it's the South and very humid, so you feel about 10X more tired than you do in Vegas, which is 5-10 degrees warmer but has no humidity. The humidity makes a big difference.

Erik

Julie Moriarty
06-20-2015, 6:03 PM
I'm not a big A/C fan, it tends to keep me indoors too much.

The program here is, have all the windows open overnight. Close them early (maybe 6AM) and leave them closed until the inside air is the same as the outside (if it gets there). Only then can you open the windows and patio doors again. If it's really hot, turn on the A/C when it gets too warm inside. Last summer we hit 900 indoors, but that was when we were in between A/C units. We had a portable A/C unit in the bedroom. :D

I've often wondered how much money I saved on electric bills over the years. Whatever it might be, the move to Florida will quickly erase that. :rolleyes:

BTW, the correct action is: don't throw your spouse under the bus... ever.

Jason Roehl
06-20-2015, 6:07 PM
I've pretty much got the wife trained. What we do with the A/C is dependent on both the temperature and humidity. If the dew point is 60F or above, the house is closed, and either the dehumidifier is running and/or the A/C if it is also warm enough outside to warrant it. The goal is 77F or lower inside, with 50%RH or less, but the A/C gets set for 77F. In the winter it's set for 66F during the day and 60F at night. We try to avoid turning it on until Nov 1. I agree with Wade about the acclimation--when I live in Brazil as a teenager, I had no problems wearing jeans when it was 95F, and where I lived never saw a temp lower than 70F. Here, the extreme range is about -20F to 105F, but mostly 0F to 95F. I definitely have a much easier time with the lower end of that range as I get older. I used to HATE the cold, but now I rather enjoy it (especially if there's snow), and HATE the heat (anything over about 80F).

Peter Kelly
06-20-2015, 6:20 PM
Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days. IWF in Atlanta is never really more than 75-80 degrees inside the convention center but it's the South and very humid, so you feel about 10X more tired than you do in Vegas, which is 5-10 degrees warmer but has no humidity. The humidity makes a big difference.

ErikIt's worst inside LVCC once they cut the air on show days during the warmer months. Not too bad when the freight doors are open during load in/out though.

Believe it or not, it gets cold as hell in there in the winter.

Myk Rian
06-20-2015, 8:03 PM
The woman is ALWAYS right. Deal with it.

Gary Yoder
06-20-2015, 8:17 PM
Be a man, give it up. Happy wife is much much better than a comfy life.;)

Steve Kinnaird
06-20-2015, 8:20 PM
Yes Dear !

Larry Frank
06-20-2015, 8:44 PM
It takes a lot of energy to squeeze moisture out of the air and out of carpet, drywall and everything else in the house. It will not save money opening windows at night because you pick up moisture in the house. In addition,the AC runs more efficiently when the outside temperature is lower. If you have high levels outside of mold, pollen, and others you will fill your h o use with them at night.

But to each their own and what makes them comfortable and happy.

I sympathize without setting up shows in the heat. However, before I retired the work area reached 130 or so and we were wearing several layers of protective clothing. The liquid steel reached well over 3000F. I do not miss it at all.

Shawn Pixley
06-20-2015, 9:25 PM
I am probably in the opposite camp here. I hate AC and frankly prefer it warmer. Our windows have been open for 4-5 months now.

All that said, I pick my battles when LOML and I disagree.

Moses Yoder
06-20-2015, 10:09 PM
In the title you are actually suggesting that your wife might be insane just because she prefers fresh air. Think about the things you do that she puts up with. I honestly for the life of me think it is absolutely ridiculous that people keep their house at 68 in the summer time and 75 in the winter time. My dad kept his house at 80 during the winter and when it got to 80 in the summer the air had to be turned on. My wife prefers fresh air and I have gotten to the point where I just allow my body to adjust to the temp.

Larry Frank
06-20-2015, 10:32 PM
If I had the weather in Mandalay Bay California, I would not run AC or heat.

Wade Lippman
06-20-2015, 10:45 PM
I honestly for the life of me think it is absolutely ridiculous that people keep their house at 68 in the summer time and 75 in the winter time.

I agree. 73 summer and 71 winter.

Moses Yoder
06-21-2015, 8:50 AM
In the title you are actually suggesting that your wife might be insane just because she prefers fresh air. Think about the things you do that she puts up with. I honestly for the life of me think it is absolutely ridiculous that people keep their house at 68 in the summer time and 75 in the winter time. My dad kept his house at 80 during the winter and when it got to 80 in the summer the air had to be turned on. My wife prefers fresh air and I have gotten to the point where I just allow my body to adjust to the temp.


I can be a little caustic, this is just my opinion; it is fine if you disagree. Also thinking about the humidity deal, it makes some sense to need it cooler in the summer because of higher humidity.

Julie Moriarty
06-21-2015, 8:54 AM
The woman is ALWAYS right.
Well, I can't agree with that sentiment. Nor can I agree with the "You're wrong, I'm right" attitude, from either side, that often leads to silly battles like this. Negativity is like cancer.

Jim Matthews
06-21-2015, 8:56 AM
Happy wife = happy life.

Amen, Reverend.

They can close the thread, now.

Al Launier
06-21-2015, 9:14 AM
Here is a timely example, since I am getting ready to go to Las Vegas for the AWFS show, next month. At these trade shows, we are there for several days ahead of time, setting up the machines and the booth. The trade shows don't turn on any A/C until the morning the show opens to the public. So, you are in the convention center, working your butt off in a non-climate controlled situation for several days. IWF in Atlanta is never really more than 75-80 degrees inside the convention center but it's the South and very humid, so you feel about 10X more tired than you do in Vegas, which is 5-10 degrees warmer but has no humidity. The humidity makes a big difference.

Erik

Finally, someone has introduced humidity as a significant factor in comfort. Perhaps that's why the same temperature in summer can feel warmer than in winter with the summer's increase in humidity.

Brian Elfert
06-21-2015, 9:23 AM
I tend to keep the A/C turned on at 75 degrees from mid June through about labor day. The humidity here is bad for much of the summer. I can handle 100 degrees and low humidity better than 80 degrees and high humidity. If I keep out of the sun 105 degrees with no humidity is quite tolerable while 90 degrees with humidity is killer. I was outside working in 80 degree heat yesterday with a dew point in the 60s and it really sapped my energy.

Bruce Page
06-21-2015, 3:20 PM
If I had the weather in Mandalay Bay California, I would not run AC or heat.
I thought Mandalay Bay was in Vegas. :confused::)

Jason Roehl
06-21-2015, 3:44 PM
I tend to keep the A/C turned on at 75 degrees from mid June through about labor day. The humidity here is bad for much of the summer. I can handle 100 degrees and low humidity better than 80 degrees and high humidity. If I keep out of the sun 105 degrees with no humidity is quite tolerable while 90 degrees with humidity is killer. I was outside working in 80 degree heat yesterday with a dew point in the 60s and it really sapped my energy.

Amen. Our dew points for the last month have been up and down, mostly above 60F, but have even spent significant time above 70F. For me, that means I start to sweat as soon as I step outside. If I'm working, I might be completely soaked by the time I'm done setting up, even in the low to mid 80s.

Ken Fitzgerald
06-21-2015, 4:21 PM
As a kid, I grew up in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and southern Illinois. Out west the humidity was typically very low in the heat of summers where we lived. In southern Illinois, the humidity was the opposite extreme. I served 8 years in the US Navy, most of it in the deep South. I knew I always felt cooler in high temperatures if the humidity was lower but couldn't figure out why.

A few years ago on Nova I saw an interesting episode. A doctor who was a marathoner researched this humidity vs body temperature using a hyperbolic chamber where he could control the humidity and temperature while he was riding a stationary bicycle. In fact, he was hotter in higher humidity with all other conditions remaining the same.

The reason for this he determined was during higher humidity levels, the air is closer to saturation therefore you experience a reduced rate of evaporation of sweat from your skin, so your body doesn't cool as well.

Myk Rian
06-21-2015, 4:32 PM
Well, I can't agree with that sentiment..
We've been married 47 years. I stand by my statement. "The woman is ALWAYS right.

Bruce Page
06-21-2015, 4:35 PM
As a kid, I grew up in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and southern Illinois. Out west the humidity was typically very low in the heat of summers where we lived. In southern Illinois, the humidity was the opposite extreme. I served 8 years in the US Navy, most of it in the deep South. I knew I always felt cooler in high temperatures if the humidity was lower but couldn't figure out why.

A few years ago on Nova I saw an interesting episode. A doctor who was a marathoner researched this humidity vs body temperature using a hyperbolic chamber where he could control the humidity and temperature while he was riding a stationary bicycle. In fact, he was hotter in higher humidity with all other conditions remaining the same.

The reason for this he determined was during higher humidity levels, the air is closer to saturation therefore you experience a reduced rate of evaporation of sweat from your skin, so your body doesn't cool as well.

I could've told you that after the first bath I took in the summer of 1979, in SE Missouri. I didn't dry off until I reached New Mexico. http://www.sawmillcreek.org/images/icons/icon6.png

Shawn Pixley
06-21-2015, 8:25 PM
It's Mandalay Shores, not Mandalay Bay. The real Mandalay is actually inland IRL. And yes, it was 85 degrees at my house with 70+% humidity yesterday. Still no AC.

Ner'theless, I grew up without AC for many years where the summers are 90+ with 90% humidity. Let's all remember AC is new in the course of human history. Those who settled this country didn't have it. If they could handle it it, we can.

Mark Blatter
06-21-2015, 8:51 PM
As a kid, I grew up in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and southern Illinois. Out west the humidity was typically very low in the heat of summers where we lived. In southern Illinois, the humidity was the opposite extreme. I served 8 years in the US Navy, most of it in the deep South. I knew I always felt cooler in high temperatures if the humidity was lower but couldn't figure out why.

A few years ago on Nova I saw an interesting episode. A doctor who was a marathoner researched this humidity vs body temperature using a hyperbolic chamber where he could control the humidity and temperature while he was riding a stationary bicycle. In fact, he was hotter in higher humidity with all other conditions remaining the same.

The reason for this he determined was during higher humidity levels, the air is closer to saturation therefore you experience a reduced rate of evaporation of sweat from your skin, so your body doesn't cool as well.

I too grew up in the west, mostly Montana and Utah, then after graduating from college went to the east coast for SWOS in Newport, then for my first tour of duty on board a destroyer based in Mayport, FL. That is about as close to torture as you can legally find. Taking a kid from the dry west and putting them in FL with 90 degree temps and 90% humidity. Ozone alerts during most summer days. Walk outside at 6:30 in the morning heading to the base and in 90 seconds be dripping in sweat.

The opposite is what I experienced this weekend. Spent it at a cabin on the Madison River in Montana. Highs were low 70s and the lows around 38. My brother does not believe in closing windows while he is there, so it was a bit chilly, but it did feel good after mid to high 90s the week prior. Here is a photo of what it looked like;

315989

Julie Moriarty
06-22-2015, 7:53 AM
We've been married 47 years. I stand by my statement. "The woman is ALWAYS right.
Many of the guys I worked with over the years were often fond of saying, "I always get the last word in all our arguments, 'Yes, Dear.'" ;)

Rod Sheridan
06-22-2015, 9:59 AM
It was cold last night, so the house is 70*. The A/C is set at 73*.

I come home from walking the dog. It was a very sticky 83* outside. My wife has windows open to let the fresh air in.
As I see it, she is letting 83* humid air in, which is about the last thing I would want to do.
She has no idea what I am upset about; what do I have against fresh air. Nothing, I was just outside for an hour; try it.

So, who is insane.

Your wife certainly failed physics, however if you ever use the word insane when talking about your wife you've obviously failed Matrimony 101 :D

Todd Burch
06-22-2015, 10:08 AM
When clicking on this link, "Who is insane here", (as in, here = SMC…) and since it was a poll, I was expecting one of the choices to be "Kent Bathurst". Sorry, wrong thread I suppose. ;) (jk Kent!)