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View Full Version : Brilliant idea for bandsaw wheels



Jim C Martin
04-14-2015, 1:48 PM
Hello All:
Check out this guy's post on ebay:
item# 191555427705
He is saying to make your bandsaw wheels out of 18.75" pulley's with a 5/8" belt stretched on to it. I imagine that this already forms a crown but you could modify a necessary. The wheel would be fairly narrow, but from what little I know of bandsaw blade tracking, the blade rides on the crown anyway so there is no need for a wider surface area.
Disclaimer: no affiliation with ebay seller, just admire his solution to large+cheap+balanced+true (probably) wheels.
Anyone already done this approach? Any feedback?
Cheers,
Jim

Jared Sankovich
04-14-2015, 7:17 PM
Its a somewhat common approach for diy band mills. Surplus center has the sheaves for $47 each.

Jim C Martin
04-14-2015, 8:39 PM
Ah, good to know. It was brand new to me.
So, I guess it must work just fine?
Thanks,
Jim

Jared Sankovich
04-15-2015, 9:26 AM
Ah, good to know. It was brand new to me.
So, I guess it must work just fine?
Thanks,
Jim

yes, they seem to.

Here one with them
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeXxE5eYGlc

Bill White
04-16-2015, 11:46 AM
The way the log was moving in the vid scared the crap outa me. I expected the blade to break any second. Wonder why he didn't secure the workpiece somehow?
Bill

Jim C Martin
04-16-2015, 12:43 PM
Thanks Jared! After watching that one on youtube, I noticed this one (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eqwZb4D9r8). At 8:53 you get a clear view of the pulley/belt combination. The belt protrudes well above the pulley indicating that it must be a larger size than 5/8" which only protrudes by about 1/8". I've already been experimenting with this in my garage and I can see that the larger belt might be better. Is this common as well? In most of the pics and videos I have seen they seem to be sticking with 5/8".
I should mention that I have two interests in this topic. One is a long term goal of building a bandsaw but I have an immediate need for a drive roller and this approach seems like it will work for me. For the drive roller application the additional protrusion might be really helpful.
Cheers,
Jim

Michael Stein
04-17-2015, 10:58 AM
The way the log was moving in the vid scared the crap outa me. I expected the blade to break any second. Wonder why he didn't secure the workpiece somehow?
Bill


Agreed. That whole contraption just scares me. Wouldn't mind having it though!

Richard Casey
04-22-2015, 11:43 PM
Jim, jump down to the Metalwork section and have a look at the homemade bandsaw, it is awesome.
rgds,
Richard.

Lee Schierer
04-25-2015, 9:42 PM
I guess the blade guards were removed for clarity of demonstration.

David Ragan
05-05-2015, 3:30 PM
Having seen a lot of industrial misadventures, seems like the fellow might be nominated for a Darwin award.

Allan Speers
07-08-2015, 2:20 AM
I guess the blade guards were removed for clarity of demonstration.


And he had a dog running around the shop while operating it, no less.

Let's hope this guy isn't allowed to vote.
Or drive.
Or leave the house without wearing a padded helmet.

Kevin Beitz
05-01-2018, 3:06 AM
Lots of people also use motor cycle wheels and tires for band mills.

Bruce Wrenn
05-04-2018, 5:58 PM
The commercial band saw mills I have seen use slack belts on sheaves. Some of them use polyurathane belts. I've seen a couple that the drive belt wraps 2/3 the way around the pulley, and then goes over sheave on motor, eliminating the need for a second pulley on the drive end. Seen several home built (I hate the term "home made, as it implies inferior) ones that use car tires, and rims. To adjust the tension, you just add more air.

Kevin Beitz
05-05-2018, 7:52 PM
I seen an old woodmizer made that way...

Henry Neufeld
05-06-2018, 4:41 PM
Does not look like his blade is being cooled. Even more likely to have it snap on him.

Bill Dufour
05-07-2018, 12:33 PM
I have seen pictures of using car tires and wheels .. the mini spare seems like a good starting point. maybe add air to tighten the blade? Forklift tires are often solid with no air.
Bill D