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Linn Meyers
03-12-2015, 4:47 PM
Bought some stuff to practice burning from Wal Mart and figured I'd give the 8x10, 3 for 2.97 primered canvas a shot. Guessed power and speed and it turned out kinda nice.
The wood grain was part of the original image. just wondered if anyone else has tried it.

Linn

308976

Sarah Wolske
03-12-2015, 5:49 PM
We use to do that at our shop all the time. We would add a texturing medium to the canvas so the laser did not interfere with the structural integrity of the stretched canvas. We would also paint the background first then etch. Then add more color into the etching to create an interesting effect. Loads of fun!

Linn Meyers
03-12-2015, 5:58 PM
Color fill would be pretty easy huh? Did you use acrylic paint?

Linn

Sarah Wolske
03-12-2015, 11:40 PM
We used oil paint thinned out with a little bit of liquin. so it would wipe into the engraving and not dry to fast onto the background. We wiped the excess off with paper towels. i will have to look on my laptop see if i find a picture

Chuck Stone
03-13-2015, 12:57 AM
I coat them with gesso and then spray on a coat of black over that.
Then laser off the top coat of paint. (very fast, low power.. it's only
a thin coat) comes out like scratchboard.

Junior hall
03-13-2015, 2:18 PM
When you say canvas are you referring to the canvas that people paint on like artist. If so never new could do that Thought it would burn threw the material

Bert Kemp
03-13-2015, 3:23 PM
Junior if you get your settings right you can laser just about any material, I engrave paper aS a test piece before using leather or wood. I also have lasered jeans with out burning thru.


When you say canvas are you referring to the canvas that people paint on like artist. If so never new could do that Thought it would burn threw the material

Dan Hintz
03-14-2015, 1:52 PM
Nicely done, Chuck.

eduard rodriguez
03-14-2015, 5:35 PM
Great Chuck, thanks for sharing :-D

Michele Welch
03-17-2015, 10:01 PM
Chuck,

These are amazing! I know our machines are quite different, but what settings did you use? And what paint did you use? I'm assuming a rattle can, but was there a specific brand and sheen? I have some great ideas for canvas, but haven't been able to get it right. Never thought of adding gesso. How smoothly do you apply? Sorry for all the questions, but thanks in advance for any answers!

Chuck Stone
03-18-2015, 11:19 AM
Thanks!
The settings are just what I need to get through the paint.. it has NOTHING to do with
what is under the paint, because if you go that far, it's too much. I don't remember
off the top of my head, but I think it was the same settings I used for cheap mirrors..
it's just enough to break through the top coating. You never reach the canvas, so it
doesn't burn.

As for prep, I put 3 coats of gesso on them and sanded between coats. If I go too hot,
at least there's some backup there. (gesso has clay in it) They're not thick coats, just
what you'd paint on with a brush. Not really thin coats, either. It's thick stuff, so just
paint it on evenly. Might not even need 3 coats, but it makes me feel better in case
I get thin spots. Then again, if my settings were accurate, I probably wouldn't need the
gesso, either.

The smoother you sand the gesso, the higher resolution you can get.

I use the rattle can stuff.. although not the high temp or engine enamel. Krylon and
Rustoleum are about all I can get here, so I know it's one of those.. but no preference.

Once you dial it in, it's an easy technique to use, and can be quite effective. I find that
it is well suited to old advertisements.. woodcuts.. they look dated to start, and this
keeps the look. Very popular with a distressed frame as bathroom decorations. Finding
good images in the public domain is key..

Hilton Lister
03-18-2015, 6:10 PM
Very nice. I'd like to try this but what is gesso? Not a term I'm familiar with at all.

Tony Lenkic
03-18-2015, 6:25 PM
Gesso is Italian for chalk / gypsum.

Dan Hintz
03-18-2015, 6:47 PM
Very nice. I'd like to try this but what is gesso? Not a term I'm familiar with at all.

True gesso is basically a chalk-filled paint... it does a wonderful job at sucking up paint that's put on top. There are other versions out there called gesso, but the makeup is a bit different and cannot truly be called gesso. that said, the other versions also often offer more benefits, such as higher flexibility, etc.

Hilton Lister
03-19-2015, 3:21 AM
Thank you for the explanation.

Mike DeRegnaucourt
03-19-2015, 11:33 AM
Very nice! Great job!

Michele Welch
03-20-2015, 1:38 PM
Thanks!
The settings are just what I need to get through the paint.. it has NOTHING to do with
what is under the paint, because if you go that far, it's too much. I don't remember
off the top of my head, but I think it was the same settings I used for cheap mirrors..
it's just enough to break through the top coating. You never reach the canvas, so it
doesn't burn.

As for prep, I put 3 coats of gesso on them and sanded between coats. If I go too hot,
at least there's some backup there. (gesso has clay in it) They're not thick coats, just
what you'd paint on with a brush. Not really thin coats, either. It's thick stuff, so just
paint it on evenly. Might not even need 3 coats, but it makes me feel better in case
I get thin spots. Then again, if my settings were accurate, I probably wouldn't need the
gesso, either.

The smoother you sand the gesso, the higher resolution you can get.

I use the rattle can stuff.. although not the high temp or engine enamel. Krylon and
Rustoleum are about all I can get here, so I know it's one of those.. but no preference.

Once you dial it in, it's an easy technique to use, and can be quite effective. I find that
it is well suited to old advertisements.. woodcuts.. they look dated to start, and this
keeps the look. Very popular with a distressed frame as bathroom decorations. Finding
good images in the public domain is key..


Thanks for the info Chuck. Did you use gloss, semi gloss, satin or flat paint? I have gesso but it isn't a thick gesso. More like the consistency of glue. I'm doing some canvases now so I'll see how it goes. I've not had any luck with pictures of any sort on any material so it's a crap shoot if mine will turn out. I use illustrator and not Corel and for some reason I can't get the settings or image right to do a decent picture. Any tips you can pass along? Your examples look as if they came straight out of a magazine? Thanks again for all the answers but that's how us newbies learn?

Chuck Stone
03-25-2015, 12:05 AM
I think the images I posted were old magazine ads I got off of the web.
The paint really doesn't matter.. I used whatever can was handy. I think
some are semi gloss, some are matte.

I don't think Illustrator/Corel matters.. I think I did the first ones in Photoshop.
But it really doesn't matter. You're just applying enough power to take off the
thin layer of paint. It was all completely new to me, too.

I'd say take a canvas, cover in gesso and spray over it. Then do some testing.
Do thick and thin lines and some text. An inch should do fine. Try some settings.
Then move the test over a little and test new settings on a different spot. Fill the
canvas with tests.. one of them will be right!

Kim Vellore
04-27-2015, 8:31 PM
Chuck,
That was an awesome idea, I tried it with three colors, I first painted Gesso, follower by red, then gold then black. Took this dragon tattoo off the web and rastered it at 60% power 100% speed on my Legend 45tt, it turned out nice looking. I only wish I could raster bottom up, since the white of the canvas got covered with soot of burning paint when I wiped it off the white became dull and the gold too got dull. Under different lighting angles the gold shows up real nice.312431
Kim

Bert Kemp
04-27-2015, 8:40 PM
Kim list your laser in your signature maybe some can tell you how to raster from bot up:)

Don Corbeil
04-28-2015, 12:29 AM
If it's a trotec, you definitely can raster from bottom up in the plate setup tab.

Mayo Pardo
04-28-2015, 2:56 AM
The 3 pack of inexpensive canvas from Walmart comes with white on it already. I assume it's a primer. It's very easy to work with however don't use double sided tape to hold it to your laser bed. When you go to lift it out the tape will rip off the white paper on back of the canvas. I only did this on one piece because it wouldn't lay flat.

I tried engraving with no gesso and with gesso and could not really see what benefit it is to use it.
If the canvas was raw, then yes it would definitely help.
If the purpose is to smooth out the canvas then why use canvas at all? Primed MDF would be the way to go.

Is there a perception that graphics on canvas should sell for more money than graphics on MDF or plywood?
With the abundance of digital printers capable of printing on canvas, I don't think that's the case any longer.

Dan Hintz
04-28-2015, 8:06 AM
The 3 pack of inexpensive canvas from Walmart comes with white on it already. I assume it's a primer.

I tried engraving with no gesso and with gesso and could not really see what benefit it is to use it.

If the canvas was raw, then yes it would definitely help.

Gesso is, essentially, a primer... sounds like what you got from Wal-Mart was already a gesso-style canvas, so adding more gesso was extra work for no gain.

Nicolas Silva
04-28-2015, 10:44 AM
Great Job Linn and Chuck.

Chuck Stone
04-30-2015, 6:12 PM
Is there a perception that graphics on canvas should sell for more money than graphics on MDF or plywood?
With the abundance of digital printers capable of printing on canvas, I don't think that's the case any longer.

I've been printing on canvas with digital printers for over 20 years. I have been engraving on MDF and
plywood since I got the laser. I've been engraving on the canvas for about the last year or so.

Is there a perception that it sells for more?
.
I'm doing something other people are not doing. People are buying it.
That'$ all the perception I need.

If there's no difference between your canvas with and without gesso, then
chances are it is already primed, like Dan mentioned.
I've done it without gesso at first (didn't have any) and went right through
the canvas in some places. Backing off the power left areas that weren't
engraved well. Canvas is woven, so it isn't a consistent surface to etch on.

The 'gesso' that has a glue-like consistency isn't really gesso, it's a canvas prep.
But they call it gesso anyway .. probably because artists are used to priming with
gesso. Most of the newer ones are acrylic based.
I add powdered marble to mine just because I have it, and if I overdo the heat, the
marble will stop it from getting to the canvas.

I do this technique on MDF too and it works just fine. It just doesn't sell as well.