PDA

View Full Version : when looking for work how would you answer this question



Brian Ashton
02-21-2015, 9:40 PM
You walk into an interview and the first question out the interviewers mouth is: how old are you? How would you answer that?

Now I don't think stating the obvious that such a line of questioning violates the relevant anti discrimination laws is going to help anyone get to the next round of the application process. What I'm hoping for is some food for thought so I can formulate an answer thats creative and maybe eloquently dodges the question

John Coloccia
02-21-2015, 9:43 PM
You walk into an interview and the first question out the interviewers mouth is: how old are you? How would you answer that?

I'd answer with my feet. On your way out, consider yourself lucky that he answered all of YOUR questions without wasting too much of your time. Only a clown would ask a question like that, because everyone should know by now that you simply can't ask that on an interview. If they're that stupid from square one, believe me when I tell you that the stupidity runs very deep, and you're much better off simply parting ways amicably.

Wade Lippman
02-21-2015, 9:51 PM
If someone asks me how old I am I will tell them how old I am. Maybe it is illegal, but the absolute worst that can happen is that you don't get hired; and if you don't answer you won't get hired. It is all upside.
If nothing else, you will get some practice.

Robert LaPlaca
02-21-2015, 9:53 PM
I believe John's answer is the correct one.. Just out of curiousity, it was an interview at a small business?

John Coloccia
02-21-2015, 9:59 PM
If someone asks me how old I am I will tell them how old I am. Maybe it is illegal, but the absolute worst that can happen is that you don't get hired; and if you don't answer you won't get hired. It is all upside.
If nothing else, you will get some practice.

The thing is that they just opened themselves up to an age discrimination lawsuit. This is just how it works, and if they're so incredibly clueless now, you can be sure that bad decision making is just par for the course. I guess everyone's situation is different, but as a general rule, it's almost certainly best for the career to simply git while the gittin's good.

Charles Wiggins
02-21-2015, 10:04 PM
I'd probably say something like, "Personally, I don't mind answering, but you should be aware that it's illegal to ask that."

On a side note, at my educational institution I was chastised for using the term, "overqualified" because it could be misconstrued as a euphemism for "too old." Nevermind that: 1) we only required a H.S. diploma, and 2) the person to which I was referring was in their late twenties, 3) with a master's degree, plus 4) the person we actually hired was in her mid-fifties. And 5) no candidates were present when I said it.

Phil Thien
02-21-2015, 10:21 PM
The thing is that they just opened themselves up to an age discrimination lawsuit. This is just how it works, and if they're so incredibly clueless now, you can be sure that bad decision making is just par for the course. I guess everyone's situation is different, but as a general rule, it's almost certainly best for the career to simply git while the gittin's good.

I do IT work and have worked with quite a few small businesses and yeah, that is pretty much how it works.

Typically it isn't a lawsuit, it is someone from the EEOC and a hole bunch of trouble that ensues.

I did work for an institution that hired an organizational consultant that told me he was in favor of replacing older workers with younger ones with more drive and energy, and less baggage.

The guy was in his early 60's!

I knew one of the board members quite well and filled him in. He said he'd look into it but before much time passed, the consultant up-and-died. It was quite unexpected, the guy was in good health.

Mike Lassiter
02-21-2015, 10:44 PM
I would tell them.
I am approaching 57, and if that answer would be a problem AFTER seeing me in person (or otherwise) I doubt I would want to work for someone that would put more importance on my age instead of my ability.

Bruce Page
02-21-2015, 11:20 PM
I would reply with "Why do you ask?" and put the onus back on him. Then I would likely walk out the door.

Jim Koepke
02-22-2015, 1:09 AM
In my last job and many like it, being requested to take a drug test or how old you are is tantamount to a job offer. I would shake the man's hand and ask him when I start and have him direct me to their Human Resources person to fill out the W-4s and such.

Or I would go with what John said and explain my disdain of working for someone who expected to treat employees in an unlawful manner.


I knew one of the board members quite well and filled him in. He said he'd look into it but before much time passed, the consultant up-and-died. It was quite unexpected, the guy was in good health.

Organizations having board members with that kind of power are ones for whom I will not work or seek employment.:eek:

I remember the last "creepy guy" who had me in the same organization. He was a hired "turnaround expert" turned in to top management. One of the guys gave him a nick name that stuck, TBGB for "the bald guy Bill."

jtk

Jim Koepke
02-22-2015, 1:13 AM
What I'm hoping for is some food for thought so I can formulate an answer thats creative and maybe eloquently dodges the question

Forgot about the "dodge the question" answer.

How about, "Just like Jack Benny, I'm 39."

jtk

Moses Yoder
02-22-2015, 6:19 AM
I would reply "I am 47 years old. I have considerable experience in my field, have an excellent attendance record, have gained a lot of wisdom with my experience, and feel that my age and experience is definitely an advantage for the job I am applying for."

Every employer discriminates. They always choose what they feel is the best out of all the applicants.

Dom Garafalo
02-22-2015, 7:46 AM
Actually, asking the question "how old are you" is not what's illegal, using the answer to make a hiring decision is.

Frederick Skelly
02-22-2015, 7:47 AM
I agree its an improper question AND that theres a high likelihood the management stinks. But Id definitely answer the question. Then, directly or indirectly, Id be interviewing HIM. He now has to convince ME that the whole company isnt just as clueless as he seems to be. And his inappropriate 1st question just made that a harder job. Its possible this guy might be an exception and the firm is ok. Ive already spent the cab fare - Id finish the interview. Id ask "Sir, what's your job here? Oh, you're the owner, I bet thats neat. (STRIKE 2) "How many employees work here? Wow, youve grown it to 50 people? Thats amazing. Will I be working directly under you or will there be a manager between us? Directly for you? Oh good, I can learn something." STRIKE 3) The exact questions would vary with his answers. But Id definitely stay and convince myself. Im already there and there is still a very small chance he set the wrong first impression.

Rich Harkrader
02-22-2015, 8:23 AM
I'm as old as my tongue and a little older than my teeth.

-Johnathan Swift

Joe Kieve
02-22-2015, 8:37 AM
"I'm old enough to know better but too young to care".

Lee Schierer
02-22-2015, 9:04 AM
Asking how old someone is is really a dumb question as an interviewer. If you have the person's resume, generally you have the years they worked at previous jobs right in front of you and possibly when they completed college or high school as well. Or, their cover letter says 37 years experience. I don't know that I would walk out, but I would sure proceed with caution and ask why this position is available.

Jerome Stanek
02-22-2015, 9:10 AM
Asking how old someone is is really a dumb question as an interviewer. If you have the person's resume, generally you have the years they worked at previous jobs right in front of you and possibly when they completed college or high school as well. Or, their cover letter says 37 years experience. I don't know that I would walk out, but I would sure proceed with caution and ask why this position is available.

I have seen some resumes that if yo add up all the years of experience the person would be a lot older than they are.

Pat Barry
02-22-2015, 9:53 AM
Forgot about the "dodge the question" answer.

How about, "Just like Jack Benny, I'm 39."

jtk
Only someone older than dirt, like me, would remember that saying. LOL

Raymond Fries
02-22-2015, 11:02 AM
Illegal question but a tough spot.

I would get creative and say something like this:

" that is a very interesting way to ask for age by extension. I have become very comfortable with ( whatever the experience you are trying to convey. Offer a name of a famous craftsman.)." I would talk around it. If the interviewer then pushes, I would say how is my age relevant to this position. I thought age was not supposed to matter. Please explain to me how it does matter for this position.

look at Wikipedia and search for old

I agree with prior posts that this might not be a place to work.

Good Luck

Eduard Nemirovsky
02-22-2015, 11:21 AM
I don't see any problem to answer on this question, why most of you immediately talking about legal/illegal issue. Person asking question may have nothing wrong in mind, or at least did not do anything illegal yet.
These days looks like everybody looking on any problem from legal stand point, even in my field (treating patient). It is become annoying and in my opinion simple dangerous to the patients.
Thank you,
Ed.

John Coloccia
02-22-2015, 1:06 PM
I don't see any problem to answer on this question, why most of you immediately talking about legal/illegal issue. Person asking question may have nothing wrong in mind, or at least did not do anything illegal yet.
These days looks like everybody looking on any problem from legal stand point, even in my field (treating patient). It is become annoying and in my opinion simple dangerous to the patients.
Thank you,
Ed.

Because if they're stupid enough now to ask questions everyone knows you shouldn't ask, you can be sure this is just the tip of the iceberg of stupidity. I don't care if they know my age. I care if they know how to do business. You ask me that question and you fail my interview, just as surely as if you catch me in a major lie on my resume, I fail.

Jim Koepke
02-22-2015, 1:17 PM
I have seen some resumes that if yo add up all the years of experience the person would be a lot older than they are.

The smell of what such a resume is full of should give it away as being a fabrication. :D

jtk

Robert LaPlaca
02-22-2015, 1:43 PM
Because if they're stupid enough now to ask questions everyone knows you shouldn't ask, you can be sure this is just the tip of the iceberg of stupidity.

Jeez John, I couldn't agree more..

Brian Elfert
02-22-2015, 8:09 PM
While it appears legally that you can ask someone's age, why do it if you can't legally use that information to make a hiring decision? We all know that hiring decisions are made every day based on age of the applicant even if not legal. The hiring person can find a dozen other reasons why the person wasn't hired even if age was a major factor.

If Hooter's is interviewing for wait staff and a a 50 year female comes in what are the chances she would be hired even if she looks good? Hooters probably wouldn't hire her based on age because patrons expect young women.

Tim Boger
02-22-2015, 8:12 PM
A persons age is reasonable easy to assess without asking the question, would it bother me if I was asked ... not a bit. If age is a consideration for the job description I'd just as soon know that early on.

Tim

Myk Rian
02-22-2015, 8:29 PM
My reply?
"Fella. I'm old enough to take you to court, and keep you there for years".

Brian Ashton
02-22-2015, 9:01 PM
I agree with what most said - not a place I want to work. I had pretty much decided that before the interview was over. But it's a question that comes up fairly often so was just wondering how others respond.

There were a lot of red flags throughout the interview, that question just happened to be the first. Others were: 1) Ultra religious management (made of of dad, mom and the son doing the interview, and his wife), a good portion of the interview was taken up with the son not trying to explain their religious beliefs but more preaching them. I have no problems with religious people, I do have a problem when it come across with a great deal of fanaticism... 2) He made it very clear that he and his parents were very guarded over their business and highly protective of the clients. I'd expect all bosses to try to protect their business but to convey it in a way that feels like intimidation is plain stupid and boarders on paranoia. 3) it was a home business that was run by dad, mom, son and his wife. It's rare to find anyone that says working for a family is a good experience. 4) the son conveyed that he can be quite hard on employees. The way it came across is he's a bit of a monkey i.e. he likes to scream and throw crap. 5) no longterm employees, i.e. over 5 years. He never told me how long the longest had been there but the oldest employee was 20 so it's at best a year. 6) related to the managers paranoia was that they don't support any training that would allow an employee to be accredited in any way, considering this field requires accreditation... He said there was training but it was all in house or run by their "partners". In fact he strongly alluded that he doesn't support any employees desire to advance beyond a para-planner level. 7)Related to 6, none of the principal people have any qualifications that they're willing to show on their website or walls. He was elusive when I mentioned qualifications were required for that industry. I suspect they don't have any qualifications (but have found a way around the qualification requirements by being under an umbrella company (their "partner") that takes on their liability and performs some rudimentary quality assurance audit every now and again.

My quickly eroding enthusiasm and facial expressions (there was a few times I forgot to maintain my poker face) in the interview showed through and he didn't invite me back for round two where the (un)lucky recruit was to front the parents.

There was one good point however. In the waiting room they had a note on a chalk board addressed to me saying welcome... That was nice!?

John Sanford
02-22-2015, 10:23 PM
My answer: "I'm old enough to remember when asking that question in an interview was legal. Or perhaps I read about it in a history book. Next question."

John Coloccia
02-22-2015, 10:27 PM
I agree with what most said - not a place I want to work. I had pretty much decided that before the interview was over. But it's a question that comes up fairly often so was just wondering how others respond.

There were a lot of red flags throughout the interview, that question just happened to be the first. Others were: 1) Ultra religious management (made of of dad, mom and the son doing the interview, and his wife), a good portion of the interview was taken up with the son not trying to explain their religious beliefs but more preaching them. I have no problems with religious people, I do have a problem when it come across with a great deal of fanaticism... 2) He made it very clear that he and his parents were very guarded over their business and highly protective of the clients. I'd expect all bosses to try to protect their business but to convey it in a way that feels like intimidation is plain stupid and boarders on paranoia. 3) it was a home business that was run by dad, mom, son and his wife. It's rare to find anyone that says working for a family is a good experience. 4) the son conveyed that he can be quite hard on employees. The way it came across is he's a bit of a monkey i.e. he likes to scream and throw crap. 5) no longterm employees, i.e. over 5 years. He never told me how long the longest had been there but the oldest employee was 20 so it's at best a year. 6) related to the managers paranoia was that they don't support any training that would allow an employee to be accredited in any way, considering this field requires accreditation... He said there was training but it was all in house or run by their "partners". In fact he strongly alluded that he doesn't support any employees desire to advance beyond a para-planner level. 7)Related to 6, none of the principal people have any qualifications that they're willing to show on their website or walls. He was elusive when I mentioned qualifications were required for that industry. I suspect they don't have any qualifications (but have found a way around the qualification requirements by being under an umbrella company (their "partner") that takes on their liability and performs some rudimentary quality assurance audit every now and again.

My quickly eroding enthusiasm and facial expressions (there was a few times I forgot to maintain my poker face) in the interview showed through and he didn't invite me back for round two where the (un)lucky recruit was to front the parents.

There was one good point however. In the waiting room they had a note on a chalk board addressed to me saying welcome... That was nice!?

LOL....as I said, the stupidity clearly runs deep. :)

David Linnabary
02-23-2015, 7:40 AM
I don't see that question as having to do with age. It's an opportunity to demonstrate how you handle yourself on difficult questions. More specifically it might be about how forthcoming you will be toward someone in authority. In the end it's not if you tell them your age, it's how you present it.

David

Dan Hintz
02-23-2015, 8:49 AM
I agree with what most said - not a place I want to work. I had pretty much decided that before the interview was over. But it's a question that comes up fairly often so was just wondering how others respond.

There were a lot of red flags throughout the interview, that question just happened to be the first. Others were: 1) Ultra religious management (made of of dad, mom and the son doing the interview, and his wife), a good portion of the interview was taken up with the son not trying to explain their religious beliefs but more preaching them. I have no problems with religious people, I do have a problem when it come across with a great deal of fanaticism... 2) He made it very clear that he and his parents were very guarded over their business and highly protective of the clients. I'd expect all bosses to try to protect their business but to convey it in a way that feels like intimidation is plain stupid and boarders on paranoia. 3) it was a home business that was run by dad, mom, son and his wife. It's rare to find anyone that says working for a family is a good experience. 4) the son conveyed that he can be quite hard on employees. The way it came across is he's a bit of a monkey i.e. he likes to scream and throw crap. 5) no longterm employees, i.e. over 5 years. He never told me how long the longest had been there but the oldest employee was 20 so it's at best a year. 6) related to the managers paranoia was that they don't support any training that would allow an employee to be accredited in any way, considering this field requires accreditation... He said there was training but it was all in house or run by their "partners". In fact he strongly alluded that he doesn't support any employees desire to advance beyond a para-planner level. 7)Related to 6, none of the principal people have any qualifications that they're willing to show on their website or walls. He was elusive when I mentioned qualifications were required for that industry. I suspect they don't have any qualifications (but have found a way around the qualification requirements by being under an umbrella company (their "partner") that takes on their liability and performs some rudimentary quality assurance audit every now and again.

My quickly eroding enthusiasm and facial expressions (there was a few times I forgot to maintain my poker face) in the interview showed through and he didn't invite me back for round two where the (un)lucky recruit was to front the parents.

There was one good point however. In the waiting room they had a note on a chalk board addressed to me saying welcome... That was nice!?

Reading that, the original question doesn't surprise me in the least. It's the mom and pop shops that have gotten away with skirting the law so long they don't know any better.

If it were a larger company, I would answer something like "I have the energy of a teenager and the experience of a retiree." It's up to them to determine my rough age.

If the questions continue in the same illegal vein, or I get the impression it will not be an environment conducive to actual work, I'll bail.

Brian Ashton
02-23-2015, 8:50 AM
I don't see that question as having to do with age. It's an opportunity to demonstrate how you handle yourself on difficult questions. More specifically it might be about how forthcoming you will be toward someone in authority. In the end it's not if you tell them your age, it's how you present it.

David

When I consider his age (about 23 or 24) the body language and what was said after, I highly doubt he was conducting a test. Just a meathead with a over exaggerated sense of importance.

Grant Wilkinson
02-23-2015, 9:21 AM
I've been out looking for something part time for a few weeks now, here in Ontario. I'm not looking a Mom and Pop places. At two of the major shipping companies, I was told that they were concerned that someone my age (65) would not be able to handle the physical part of the job. I pointed out that I am not overweight, I do not smoke, and I go to the gym 3 times a week. It didn't matter. When I politely pointed out that age discrimination was against the law, I was equally politely told to take them to court. Since they have much, much more money than I do, they knew that was a non-starter.

Then I had the opposite occur. I was told that I was a more attractive candidate for a driving job since I was older and a better insurance risk than a younger guy.

In both of these situations, any legal restrictions are/were pretty much irrelevant.

Keith Outten
02-23-2015, 9:40 AM
Most of the time you are required to fill out an application before you are called for an interview. You are always required to provide the date that you graduated from high school, college, etc. From that information most people can accurately calculate your age. Whether you answer the question or not is of little value unless you want the job. Laws against age discrimination are worthless.

FWIW in the early 1970's it was impossible to get a job if your draft classification was 1A. I had companies tell me they would throw my application in the trash the minute I left the building. You will only find Fair in the dictionary, its just the way it is.

Phil Thien
02-23-2015, 9:47 AM
When I politely pointed out that age discrimination was against the law, I was equally politely told to take them to court. Since they have much, much more money than I do, they knew that was a non-starter.

Here in the U.S., you'd be able to file a complaint with the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission).

If you don't seem like a complete nut job, they may go so far as to send a "tester" (an undercover 60-something guy) to interview for the same position.

John Sanford
02-23-2015, 2:33 PM
I have seen some resumes that if yo add up all the years of experience the person would be a lot older than they are.

Sure. Mine. When you're going to school full time, working a full time job, AND have a part time job, experience adds up fast.

Dan Hintz
02-23-2015, 4:51 PM
Sure. Mine. When you're going to school full time, working a full time job, AND have a part time job, experience adds up fast.

Don't forget working two part-time jobs at the same time... there's quite a bit of overlap in mine.

Lee Schierer
02-23-2015, 6:13 PM
Most of the time you are required to fill out an application before you are called for an interview.

For most management and salaried positions, you don't see an application until they make you an offer and you accept. I've been on dozens of interviews and never filled out an application

Dan Hintz
02-24-2015, 6:24 AM
For most management and salaried positions, you don't see an application until they make you an offer and you accept. I've been on dozens of interviews and never filled out an application

When I'm handed an application, I typically only fill in the major details (name, address, etc.). I don't bother with education, last 50 jobs, and so on... that's what the resume is for. It gets stapled to the application, and my resume does not include my high school.

Duane Meadows
02-24-2015, 9:02 AM
The smell of what such a resume is full of should give it away as being a fabrication. :D

jtk

Some folks DO work more than one job at the same time! I know my dad much oh his life. Of course that too, should be obvious from a proper resume. And, as stated above, HS graduation dates, and such should give a pretty good clue anyway.

At least if asked openly, you know it is an issue! If the interviewer doesn't ask, it is much harder to tell if discrimination has taken place!

All hiring decisions are subject to some level of opinion that may or may not be legal discrimination. Just because certain question were, or were not asked doesn't change that.

Bottom line, if you not comfortable with an interview, nothing says that you must take any resulting job offer. I am sure that in many cases some "discrimination may be involved in that decision as well.

Anyone who thinks my opinion and prejudices(whatever they may be) don't effect decisions I make, are not being too realistic! Whether its is hiring an employee or buying a table saw.

Brian Elfert
02-24-2015, 11:02 AM
I was asked at my job interview if I had ever crashed a server. I'm pretty sure it was an honesty test more than anything. Any server admin who has been in the business long enough has crashed a server at some point by their mistake.

Jim Koepke
02-24-2015, 12:35 PM
Some folks DO work more than one job at the same time! I know my dad much oh his life.

Yes, during the 1980s it was common for many to have a lot of part time jobs. At one time I did one full time and three part time jobs Though I have seen resumes that would have required a person to work 24 hour days.

One person of my acquaintance had a totally made up resume. It mostly consisted of companies that went under. As he got jobs with his fiction the bottom job would drop off and his last job would be on the top. He was quite the con until it came time to produce. It is rather difficult to package and ship hot air.

jtk

Jim Koepke
02-24-2015, 12:38 PM
Yes, some people work odd and multiple jobs.

Though when a resume doesn't add up, it should either be questioned or placed in the circular file.

jtk

Keith Outten
02-24-2015, 1:02 PM
For most management and salaried positions, you don't see an application until they make you an offer and you accept. I've been on dozens of interviews and never filled out an application

Interesting, I have never had an interview before I filled out an application and I worked in management most of my life. I worked for very large companies for the most part......Newport News Shipbuilding, Stone and Webster Engineering, Virginia Electric and Power Company, etc.
.

David Linnabary
02-25-2015, 8:14 AM
When I consider his age (about 23 or 24) the body language and what was said after, I highly doubt he was conducting a test. Just a meathead with a over exaggerated sense of importance.

Yeah, it wasn't a question, it was more of a statement. :( Sorry to hear it, I'm sure that was an uncomfortable experience. That person was probably threatened by your age and experience, those can be very intimidating.

David

dennis thompson
02-25-2015, 1:49 PM
You walk into an interview and the first question out the interviewers mouth is: how old are you? How would you answer that?

Now I don't think stating the obvious that such a line of questioning violates the relevant anti discrimination laws is going to help anyone get to the next round of the application process. What I'm hoping for is some food for thought so I can formulate an answer thats creative and maybe eloquently dodges the question

What' s the problem with giving your age? It's my impression that even getting an interview these days is very difficult, much less getting a job. If you want the job give him your age and get on with the interview.

Dan Hintz
02-25-2015, 4:12 PM
What' s the problem with giving your age? It's my impression that even getting an interview these days is very difficult, much less getting a job. If you want the job give him your age and get on with the interview.

It's a slippery slope akin to "If you're not guilty, you have no reason not to submit to a search". Once you open up the door to allowing businesses to ask questions they shouldn't (and thereby making decisions based upon that data), there's no longer any protection.

Curt Harms
02-26-2015, 9:58 AM
Here in the U.S., you'd be able to file a complaint with the EEOC (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission).

If you don't seem like a complete nut job, they may go so far as to send a "tester" (an undercover 60-something guy) to interview for the same position.

Yup. A related story. A company I was working at laid off and older guy and retained a younger shorter tenured guy. There were reasons other than age for them to do what they did but nothing documented. The older guy went to an age discrimination government agency, not sure which one. As I heard it third hand, the agency person asked the company "Is the older gentleman as qualified to do this job as the younger one and has he been with your company longer?"
Company in question" Yes".
Agency person: "Has the older person had any history of incompetence or misbehavior?"
Company: "No"
Agency Person: "Pay the man".

Art Mann
02-26-2015, 1:01 PM
There is always a way to explain why an older person was laid off for other reasons besides age discrimination whether it is true or not. I am aware of a guy who was an expert at a certain type of Army test set that was laid off due to his age (60+) rather than his ability. He was, in fact, the only person who truly understood the design and function of the product. Eventually, the company lost some very lucrative business because there was nobody left to competently manage the program. Fools!

Mike Lassiter
02-26-2015, 1:19 PM
Where my wife works a man around 60 was fired about 2 years ago. There where many good reasons for it, but there was no documentation for any of it. Later he sued then for age discrimination and won. I think he was awarded something like $300K plus had to pay his legal fees on top of it. There were times that he wasn't at work that he claimed he was (time wrote down due to nature of work done) and repeatedly late with no reason and so forth. Management was aware of these things but failed to properly document them over the months they occurred. So he claimed age was the reason for being terminated. Not sure what facts came out in court over it, but apparently wasn't any proof other than saying he did these things. He was close to retirement age, and the order was he to be paid for all the back pay he would have received had he been working still, plus a healthy sum on top of that.

Rich Riddle
02-26-2015, 2:53 PM
I would answer it like all their questions, as honest as possible. I wouldn't mention it being illegal since that really wouldn't serve any purpose. I am in the protected age category of over 40. Many people error thinking all ages are protected; they aren't.

http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/age.cfm