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View Full Version : Badger knot came today (shaving)



Moses Yoder
06-21-2014, 7:42 PM
For the price I was concerned that this would be too small or something else would be wrong with it. I have never used a shaving brush but this one seems great, a good size for me, firm but not scratchy. I am extremely pleased with it, looking at handle designs.

291710

Joe Tilson
06-24-2014, 3:46 PM
Moses,
You really are serious about this neanderthal thing aren't you? Well,I still use the Mach 3. Zip, zap, zop, I just ripped my face to shreds!!!!:D

David Weaver
06-24-2014, 4:04 PM
Moses, when you brought this up, I ordered a knot, too, from china. But I ordered one that was very small and not dense (the other knots I have are large and dense, and you could literally lather four times with them and still probably add water and lather a couple more).

If you want to turn one and you have a chuck, the whole process of a handle is a piece of cake limited only by how complicated you want to make the handle. Even if not turning one, an octagonal handle would look pretty cool.

I turned a quicky handle out of maple on Sunday (solely because I have a large maple dowel and can just dump it right in the chuck), but didn't take a picture - just a very plain pattern that looks like any of the cheapie brushes online. The small knot definitely makes it harder to get nearly so much lather.

Not that turning one requires a chuck either, I guess. It's just easier to center the hole in the handle for the knot with a chuck.

Moses Yoder
06-24-2014, 7:28 PM
I am limited to turning between centers and have a mother in law project in the shop right now but will probably turn it on Saturday regardless. I found an ideal chunk of cocobolo and have a nice pattern from Google images. Have to buy some epoxy yet.

Matt Zettl
06-25-2014, 6:48 AM
Moses,

If you do not have a Jacobs chuck that you can mount in the headstock spindle, then you can turn the handle between centers, then drill the hole for the knot in a drill press using the center from the spur drive or the tailstock center. If you have a Jacobs chuck, you can drill the hole for the knot first, then screw an arbor into the center point of the hole, and mount that into the chuck to turn the handle. The latter is the better method, as you can turn and finish the entire handle, including the bottom, on the lathe.

In determining the depth of the hole, you want to keep in mind what you want the loft of the knot to be. The loft is simply the height of the badger hairs that stick out of the brush. For example, if you have a 22mm x 65mm knot, and set it 15 mm deep, your loft would be 50 mm. The shorter the loft, the stiffer the brush. Some prefer a stiffer brush to aid in exfoliation, while others prefer a floppier, softer feel. You can experiment a bit by drilling the hole deep, and using pennies or other spacers to build up to various loft heights. Alternatively, you can drill holes of varying depths in a scrap block of wood to test various lofts. Finally, it is sometimes worthwhile to use a small amount of silicone adhesive to set the knot initially as opposed to epoxy. With the silicone, the knot can be removed if you find the loft not to your likiing, and then you can re-set it. With epoxy, there is no going back. Some use silicone permanently, as there is little chance of the knot coming loose in average use if the hole is the correct diameter and the knot fits snugly.

I have been using a brush for about 15 years, and I have made new handles and also restored vintage handles. The aerosol shave cream just doesn't compare, and you will love the brush. Beware though, once you start trying various creams and soaps you will be on a slippery slope! ;)

Hope this helps.

Matt

Rod Sheridan
06-25-2014, 10:07 AM
For the price I was concerned that this would be too small or something else would be wrong with it. I have never used a shaving brush but this one seems great, a good size for me, firm but not scratchy. I am extremely pleased with it, looking at handle designs.

291710

Ok Moses, at the risk of sounding stupid how did you apply shaving soap without a brush?

Just kidding, however I've used a badger hair brush for about 40 years now, it's still doing great.

I still have an Old Spice shaving mug, and am using a Merkur safety razor for travell and an old clamshell type at home.

My beard is fairly coarse and the old safety razors work much better than the modern multi-blade razors in my opinion, not to mention that the blades are about $20 for a pack of 100.

Have fun with the brush.............Rod.

Rod Sheridan
06-25-2014, 10:10 AM
Moses,



, once you start trying various creams and soaps you will be on a slippery slope! ;)

Hope this helps.

Matt

Matt, you should be pun-ished................Rod.

Andrew Pitonyak
06-25-2014, 11:03 AM
Ok Moses, at the risk of sounding stupid how did you apply shaving soap without a brush?

Well duh....



Catch a badger
Rub soap on badger
Rub badger on face


You might want to have 911 on speed dial when you do this!

I wish I had room to put turning equipment.. I have wanted to make a couple of handles that would probably be pretty easy with turning equipment, but really difficult without. Well, it seems that it would be difficult without.

Rod Sheridan
06-25-2014, 5:09 PM
Well duh....



Catch a badger
Rub soap on badger
Rub badger on face


You might want to have 911 on speed dial when you do this!

I wish I had room to put turning equipment.. I have wanted to make a couple of handles that would probably be pretty easy with turning equipment, but really difficult without. Well, it seems that it would be difficult without.

LOL.................I'm still laughing imagining the medical report..............Rod.

Moses Yoder
06-25-2014, 8:13 PM
I wish I had room to put turning equipment.. I have wanted to make a couple of handles that would probably be pretty easy with turning equipment, but really difficult without. Well, it seems that it would be difficult without.

The Jet mini lathe I think would be the last piece of equipment I would sell out of my shop. It is very well made, a solid hunk of iron, a joy to use. Of course, you could always make a treadle lathe.

Wouldn't you have to see a badger before you could catch one?

Andrew Pitonyak
06-26-2014, 10:32 AM
The Jet mini lathe I think would be the last piece of equipment I would sell out of my shop. It is very well made, a solid hunk of iron, a joy to use. Of course, you could always make a treadle lathe.

Sadly, my biggest issue is space...


Wouldn't you have to see a badger before you could catch one?

If you really did this, the store would likely have to begin with "Well <dramatic pause>, I guess I had a bit too much to drink when we saw this badger...."