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Brian Deakin
01-30-2014, 4:31 PM
We, family of 4 (mum, dad, children girl 18 boy 15) will be travelling from the United Kingdom to Boston for a 14 day fly drive holiday in July

Initial plans 5 day stay in Boston staying at Loews Boston hotel 350 Stuart St., Back Bay, Boston, MA 02116 then drive out visit and stay in the surrounding area

My question

Ideas suggestion things to do places to stay where to eat

Preferred food American, Italian,Mexican Chinese and sea food Further I do like bakeries

regards Brian

Dave Cullen
01-30-2014, 6:07 PM
Boston is a magnificent town.

Do check out Faneuil Hall. There's shops and food of all sorts there.

The New England Aquarium - highly recommended. You can easily spend a day there.

If you're a museum type of guy, there are both art and science museums that are excellent.


There's a seafood restraunt called "No Name Restaraunt" on Boston's Fish Pier. No trip to Boston should miss that.

Andy Haney
01-30-2014, 6:56 PM
My wife and I really enjoyed a trip to Boston.

Our favorite "tourist" thing was a whale watching trip.

No bad food, but I believe you're going to Italian food heaven! I wish I could recall some of the restaurant names, but I don't think you can go wrong in that neighborhood. if you like bakeries, I don't think you should miss the Mike's experience late at night. There's a block-long line waiting to buy cannoli for breakfast the following morning. Working your way through the line is quite an experience in assertiveness.

Andy

Jim Matthews
01-30-2014, 9:46 PM
Berklee music college should have tomorrow's jazz stars, today.
Boston's "North End" is home to the North Bennett street school,
Including a gift shop that features student works, including jewelry.
The North End has excellent Italian food, featuring local seafood.

Bring cash, many of the smaller (often better) restaurants accept only
USDollars. The Boston Chinatown is easily accessible by "the Tube"
Search MTA for a map. Bao Bao gets my vote for bakeries.

What do your kids want to see?

John Lanciani
01-30-2014, 10:02 PM
Museum of Fine Arts in Boston
Lexington and Concord if you're interested in our interpretation of the revolution ;)
Old Sturbridge Village

Steve Friedman
01-30-2014, 10:35 PM
Boston is great, but London is better.

At any rate, make sure your daughter knows that she's too young to drink here.

Boston is a very walk-able city, but July in Boston could be very hot and humid. Weather permitting, the historical offerings are exceptional. If it's too hot, there are tons of museums. A day at Fenway Park watching the Red Sox play could be fun. I agree that the ethnic food is terrific, but only in ethnic neighborhoods.

Besides the museums, your kids might enjoy a trip to Salem, renting canoes or kayaks on the Charles River, or renting a sailboat on Boston Harbor. But, ultimately, Boston/Cambridge is the ultimate college town and the city is set up to entertain kids of that age, so they should not be bored. A visit to Harvard and MIT might be a cool experience.

Depending on how far you plan to travel, the Maine coast (northeast), and Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket (southeast) are worth the effort. The mountains of Western Maine (northeast), New Hampshire (north), and Vermont (northwest) are incredible even in the summer.

I'm sure you'll have fun.

Steve

Lee Schierer
01-30-2014, 11:10 PM
A must see is the USS Constitution the oldest commissioned US Naval vessel. It is moored in Boston Harbor.

Bruce Pratt
01-31-2014, 9:26 AM
Boston attractions have been pretty well covered. If you are going afield from there:1) Plymouth - site of Pilgrim's landing, related museums, shops and points of interest, including Plimoth Plantation, a living history site with 17th century period re-enactors. or 2) Farther out, a second on Old Sturbridge Village, again, a open air living history site (circa 1820-1830). If "old" does not interest, then outdoor might - consider Mt Washington, in the White Mountains (New Hampshire). You can drive to the top, and also take the cog railway (pretty interesting, even for teens). Also consider white water rafting or canoeing, again in mostly in Maine or New Hampshire (also a very teen friendly and interesting activity). If classical music is of interest, consider Boston Symphony Orchestra, which will be at Tanglewood that time of year, also Berklee School of Music (also in Boston). On the woodworking front, check out North Bennett Street School, (Boston North End). You can Goggle or Wiki all of these locations to get additional information. If you are considering taking any wood home, PM me for a list of local wood suppliers.

Rick Moyer
01-31-2014, 9:48 AM
Besides what's been covered, I would ask how far you might drive away from Boston, too. I would second the Mt Washington trip, about three hours away. Vermont and New Hampshire (Green Mountains and White Mountains) are beautiful. I would also recommend going up to Bar Harbor, ME and seeing Acadia National Park as the coast of Maine is also very beautiful. Bar Harbor area would be maybe 5 hours.

Jim Matthews
02-01-2014, 12:13 AM
I would second the Mt Washington trip, about three hours away

The Omni Mt. Washington Bretton Woods hotel is lovely, but it's the only attraction there.
Plenty to do, through the concierge, but everything has a price.

Unless you REALLY like to drive - some do - it's a slog on major highways entirely.

I recommend taking a one-stop approach.
Pick the nicest hotel you can afford.

Unpack once, and ask where the staff would go.

American history might not be the stuff of wonder for a couple European teenagers.

How about a baseball game? Something you can't get at home, that isn't "canned" for consumption....
that's what I would suggest.

Brian Deakin
02-02-2014, 11:58 AM
A huge than you to everyone for your tips and suggestions Asking the staff is a avenue for information I ad not considered and a superb tip

At this point in time we plan to arrive in Boston drive up the coast towards Bar Harbor then dive back down through Manchester to Newport the onto Chatham (allowing 9 days for this part of the holday) Then spend a further 5 days in Boston

James Conrad
02-02-2014, 3:13 PM
Since you are headed to Bar Harbor along the coast route, you might as well stop in at Lie-Nielsen! If you stay in Portland, Nosh on Congress St, great inventive gastropub food, Rosie's on Four St has the best burgers and Yosaku on Danforth has the best Sushi.

Unless there is something specific you want to see in Manchester, NH I'd skip it to spend more time in Maine, Newport or on the Cape.

When you head to the Cape try not to arrive on a Friday late afternoon or leave Sunday evening, well... Saturdays too are often a large turnover time... There are only 2 bridges handling the traffic here and it can be a nightmare in the summer, steer clear of Hyannis and Falmouth as well Traffic, Traffic, Traffic in the summer, Rt. 6 is often a better travel bet. Chatham is nice, can be busy, the Chatham Bars Inn is quite swank if you are up for that. Most Beaches require a parking permit, the National Seashore provides parking and shuttles to the beach for a price. Coast Guard Beach in Eastham is pretty popular. Sir Crickets in Orleans on 6a has the best Fried Clams bar none, the best fish market is right next door. A good family take out place is Cobies on 6a in Brewster the food is good and have ice cream and covered seating. I'm not a big fan of most of the restaurants in downtown Orleans. In Chatham Vers and the Impudent Oyster are safe bets for good food. There are a ton of parks to visit, Cape Cod Natural History Museum is on 6a in Brewster, and of course the beach.

Brian Deakin
02-02-2014, 4:53 PM
A huge thank you James for your post and the traffic advise We are currently struggling to find a suitable place to stay for one night in the Salem or the surrounding area It appears many of the hotels require you to stay for 2 nights

Can anyone help
regard Brian

James Conrad
02-02-2014, 5:03 PM
A huge thank you James for your post and the traffic advise We are currently struggling to find a suitable place to stay for one night in the Salem or the surrounding area It appears many of the hotels require you to stay for 2 nights

Can anyone help
regard Brian

Did you try the Hawthorne? http://www.hawthornehotel.com/
I think the 2 night deal is only if you arrive on a Saturday. If you come up dry let me know, I have family there who might have suggestions.

Brian Deakin
02-03-2014, 3:44 PM
Thank you James for your post. Unfortunately we arrive in Boston on the Saturday and wanted to stay in Salam Saturday night then travel North on the Sunday

regars Brian

Bob Rufener
02-04-2014, 11:44 AM
I don't think it was mentioned but I would recommend walking the Freedom Trail which takes you to many of the important historical sites in Boston. Not easy to do on a very hot day but still doable. I would also recommend going to Lexington and Concord which was the first real battle of the Revolutionary War. I had read the book "John Adams" before I went to Boston and enjoyed seeing his houses which are still standing. His last house is quite something to see and has actual furniture from John Adams. Take in a ball game at Fenway Park too if time allows. Have a few Sam Adams beers along with a lobstah. A great place to visit but not a fun place to drive in.

James Conrad
02-09-2014, 8:34 AM
Thank you James for your post. Unfortunately we arrive in Boston on the Saturday and wanted to stay in Salam Saturday night then travel North on the Sunday

regars Brian

Only other thoughts in downtown Salem is the Waterfront Hotel, their minimum is for Friday nights, or the Salem Inn. Most other accommodations are B&Bs with 2 night minimums. Outside of Salem you are likely to find larger chain hotels in the Peabody, Danvers area.

Tim Morton
02-09-2014, 2:54 PM
No One has suggested going to Fenway Park? I would put that on the list. Another thing i would suggest is finding an nice outdoor concert venue. Bethel Woods in New York state if spectacular if there happens to be someone playing there that appeals to the entire family.

Roger Feeley
02-10-2014, 11:32 PM
Check out the Old Schwamb Mill where they use specialized lathes to turn oval picture frames. Those things will bend your mind.

Or maybe Saugus Iron Works

Rick Moyer
02-11-2014, 10:42 AM
Boston is great, but London is better.

At any rate, make sure your daughter knows that she's too young to drink here.

Boston is a very walk-able city, but July in Boston could be very hot and humid. Weather permitting, the historical offerings are exceptional. If it's too hot, there are tons of museums. A day at Fenway Park watching the Red Sox play could be fun. I agree that the ethnic food is terrific, but only in ethnic neighborhoods.

Besides the museums, your kids might enjoy a trip to Salem, renting canoes or kayaks on the Charles River, or renting a sailboat on Boston Harbor. But, ultimately, Boston/Cambridge is the ultimate college town and the city is set up to entertain kids of that age, so they should not be bored. A visit to Harvard and MIT might be a cool experience.

Depending on how far you plan to travel, the Maine coast (northeast), and Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket (southeast) are worth the effort. The mountains of Western Maine (northeast), New Hampshire (north), and Vermont (northwest) are incredible even in the summer.

I'm sure you'll have fun.

Steve


The Omni Mt. Washington Bretton Woods hotel is lovely, but it's the only attraction there.
Plenty to do, through the concierge, but everything has a price.

Unless you REALLY like to drive - some do - it's a slog on major highways entirely.

I recommend taking a one-stop approach.
Pick the nicest hotel you can afford.

Unpack once, and ask where the staff would go.

American history might not be the stuff of wonder for a couple European teenagers.

How about a baseball game? Something you can't get at home, that isn't "canned" for consumption....
that's what I would suggest.


I don't think it was mentioned but I would recommend walking the Freedom Trail which takes you to many of the important historical sites in Boston. Not easy to do on a very hot day but still doable. I would also recommend going to Lexington and Concord which was the first real battle of the Revolutionary War. I had read the book "John Adams" before I went to Boston and enjoyed seeing his houses which are still standing. His last house is quite something to see and has actual furniture from John Adams. Take in a ball game at Fenway Park too if time allows. Have a few Sam Adams beers along with a lobstah. A great place to visit but not a fun place to drive in.


No One has suggested going to Fenway Park? I would put that on the list. Another thing i would suggest is finding an nice outdoor concert venue. Bethel Woods in New York state if spectacular if there happens to be someone playing there that appeals to the entire family.

Tim, you must be reading on the I-Pad again! :D