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Von Bickley
01-14-2014, 9:10 PM
not pleasant to look at. incision is about 6.5 inches. good medication = 0 pain.

Lori Kleinberg
01-14-2014, 9:20 PM
Wishing you a speedy recovery.

Steve Schlumpf
01-14-2014, 9:31 PM
Sure hope this works for you! At the very least - you're going to have a great looking scar!! Hope you heal quickly and completely!

Ken Fitzgerald
01-14-2014, 11:09 PM
Here's wishing you a speedy recovery Von!

BTW....at this stage in life, the ladies aren't impressed by the size of a scar or incision! LOL!

Heal quickly and completely!

Bruce Page
01-14-2014, 11:12 PM
Yikes!:eek: Get Well!!

Ted Calver
01-14-2014, 11:12 PM
Heal fast...love those meds.

Brian W Smith
01-15-2014, 6:21 AM
Heal up and try to listen to doc's timeline.Heres hoping you get a cute PT,haha.

Brian Ashton
01-15-2014, 6:47 AM
so give us the gory details. What is entailed in a shoulder replacement. R u talking replacement of the entire glenoid socket and humerus headů Some serious rehab in your future

Von Bickley
01-15-2014, 11:08 AM
so give us the gory details. What is entailed in a shoulder replacement. R u talking replacement of the entire glenoid socket and humerus head… Some serious rehab in your future

Brian,
With a normal shoulder replacement, the ball on the top of the shoulder bone is cut off, a hole is driven down into the shoulder bone, and a metal peg is forced down into the bone where a metal ball is attached to the top. A plastic cup is installed in the socket for the ball to ride on. My joint and rotator cuff was too bad for this procedure, so they had to do a reverse shoulder replacement.

What is a reverse shoulder replacement?
As mentioned, a traditional shoulder replacement uses a metal ball on the top of the arm bone, and a plastic socket on the shoulder blade. This is similar to how our body is designed with a ball-and-socket shoulder joint.

The reverse shoulder replacement uses a ball-and-socket joint as well, but the ball is placed on the shoulder blade, and the socket is placed on top of the arm bone. This is the reverse of our normal anatomy, and thus the name "reverse shoulder replacement."

Why wouldn't I want to recreate "normal" anatomy?
The reverse shoulder replacement is designed for patients who do not have a functioning rotator cuff, and therefore do not have "normal" shoulder anatomy. Therefore, the reverse shoulder replacement is a good option for taking care of this complicated problem.

A reverse shoulder replacement is designed to make the deltoid muscle, the large shoulder muscle, more efficient. In patients with rotator cuff tear arthropathy, the rotator cuff does not work normally, and the deltoid can help make up for this deficiency. By reversing the ball and the socket, the deltoid muscle becomes more able to lift the arm up overhead, and compensate for the torn rotator cuff.