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John Hart
05-21-2005, 6:59 AM
Walt Pater just made a post regarding coffee and I looked at his geographic location, which was "Hudson Valley, Upstate New York". Looking at the map, Hudson Valley is in the southern half of the state. I live in Cleveland Ohio...The Great Midwest....but looking at the map, I don't live anywhere close to the west. Now, I know that the term midwest probably comes from a time when the US was a tad narrower in it's breadth, but I think it's a bit goofy to say "Midwest" when it is in the eastern time zone and east of the central US.

Are there any more like that? Sorry...one of those "Saturday morning contemplating the universe with my coffee" questions.

Kirk (KC) Constable
05-21-2005, 7:20 AM
Take a look at the professional sports divisions...

Walt Pater
05-21-2005, 7:21 AM
John, You are right. A Buffalo or Rochester natives laugh at the description of my 'hood as "upstate".

Rich Konopka
05-21-2005, 10:36 AM
Walt Pater just made a post regarding coffee and I looked at his geographic location, which was "Hudson Valley, Upstate New York". Looking at the map, Hudson Valley is in the southern half of the state. I live in Cleveland Ohio...The Great Midwest....but looking at the map, I don't live anywhere close to the west. Now, I know that the term midwest probably comes from a time when the US was a tad narrower in it's breadth, but I think it's a bit goofy to say "Midwest" when it is in the eastern time zone and east of the central US.

Are there any more like that? Sorry...one of those "Saturday morning contemplating the universe with my coffee" questions.

Can you get any more specific as this?

End of the culd-de-sac :cool::cool: (http://maps.google.com/maps?q=hubbard+st,glastonbury,ct,06033&ll=41.698437,-72.591820&spn=0.005654,0.010664&t=k&hl=en)

John Hart
05-21-2005, 10:55 AM
Oh...I just thought of another one...Key West, FL is not in the Deep South. The Deep South is north of Florida.

Bill Arnold
05-21-2005, 3:46 PM
... Key West, FL is not in the Deep South. ...If the states to the north of Florida are the 'Deep' South, does that make Key West the 'Falsetto' South?

:')

Ken Garlock
05-21-2005, 4:25 PM
If the states to the north of Florida are the 'Deep' South, does that make Key West the 'Falsetto' South?

:')

How about "Baja Florida?" ;)

Lou Morrissette
05-21-2005, 4:57 PM
Where does that put Downeast Maine?:confused:

Jamie Buxton
05-21-2005, 5:30 PM
This almost a hijack, but somewhat related. Check out www.zabasearch.com. You give it a person's name, and it can return a street address, road map, and aerial photo of that location. That is, you can really "know where you live".

Joe Mioux
05-21-2005, 6:09 PM
O.K., so if John lives in the "midwest", where is the "eastwest"? For that matter, where is the "westwest", east or west of Denver? :rolleyes::eek::confused:

JOe

Karl Laustrup
05-21-2005, 6:29 PM
This almost a hijack, but somewhat related. Check out www.zabasearch.com (http://www.zabasearch.com/). You give it a person's name, and it can return a street address, road map, and aerial photo of that location. That is, you can really "know where you live".

I checked out my name and the website says I live in Onalaska, WI. Not sure how I got there and where I am now sure looks like Wisconsin Dells.

I guess us Cheeseheads are part of the Western Great Lakes. Or upper Mississippi Valley. Or Western Mid-Westerners maybe. I don't know, just don't call me late for dinner/supper. Is it SUPPER or DINNER?

David Fried
05-21-2005, 6:44 PM
I live in the Eagleville.
Eagleville was once a town but now is a section of Storrs.
Storrs, home of the Storrs Agricultural College now known as the University of Connecticut, is now a postal district in the town Mansfield which is known to address databases as Storrs-Mansfield.
Mail sent to RR 2 will reach me or use a 9 digit zip!

All this is in the north-east, quiet corner of Connecticut.

Ken Fitzgerald
05-21-2005, 6:55 PM
What if you don't know where you're going to live?

My wife got a little upset when I took a job in Bend, Oregon some 28 years ago. She didn't want to move and live with the eskimos. She thought I was lying when I told her we'd have live a "LITTLE" further North for that to happen. :confused: :rolleyes: :D

Steve Cox
05-21-2005, 8:12 PM
I'm from Oklahoma originally which is supposedly in the "Southwest" although it looks pretty close to dead center if you ask me (at least from an east/west perspective).

Lee DeRaud
05-21-2005, 8:59 PM
This almost a hijack, but somewhat related. Check out www.zabasearch.com (http://www.zabasearch.com/). You give it a person's name, and it can return a street address, road map, and aerial photo of that location. That is, you can really "know where you live".
A guy at work was talking about how he wanted a handheld GPS navigator for his birthday. We gave him the "economy model": inside his birthday card was a piece of paper with a big "X" and the words "You Are Here". :p

Arnie Grammon
05-21-2005, 9:03 PM
When I was a kid, we lived in the Yakima Washington area and went back to Denver on vacation. I was really confused (and even insulted) that the Denver area was considered "the West". To me West meant the West Coast. It's all in your perspective.

Ernie Nyvall
05-21-2005, 11:44 PM
I'm not sure how Texas is referred to.

According to the Zaba search, I dropped out of sight fifteen years ago when I moved from Kilgore, and I must be the only Ernest W Nyvall in the U.S.A. Seems like they should be able to keep up with me if that's the case. :rolleyes:

Ernie

Michael Ballent
05-22-2005, 12:05 AM
What about the southwest. I live in the Phoenix area and one of the cities is Scottsdale which calls itself the "The West's Most Western Town" How does that happen

John Hart
05-22-2005, 6:25 AM
What about the southwest. I live in the Phoenix area and one of the cities is Scottsdale which calls itself the "The West's Most Western Town" How does that happen

Maybe they know something about the San Andreas Fault that we don't know! :rolleyes:

Rich Konopka
05-22-2005, 7:09 AM
What about the southwest. I live in the Phoenix area and one of the cities is Scottsdale which calls itself the "The West's Most Western Town" How does that happen

Michael,

When I was in Scottsdale in March it did not appear to me as a "Western Town" other than an upcoming Rodeo and the "rawhide" (http://rawhide.com/) section of town.;)

Bob Borzelleri
05-22-2005, 9:40 AM
The infomation for me on Zaba is about 3 years out of date and they have the wrong birth year for me. I guess that's close enough for internet work...

Lee DeRaud
05-22-2005, 10:32 AM
The infomation for me on Zaba is about 3 years out of date and they have the wrong birth year for me. I guess that's close enough for internet work...Heh. The first entry for me is ok, but it's followed by an entry for my ex-as-of-18-years-ago-wife...at the same address. To balance that out, they have an entry for me at her address. Wonder if there's any way to have my bills sent there?

Jim DeLaney
05-22-2005, 4:55 PM
41 8.010' North; 80 47.132' West

It's Eastern Ohio, but for some unknown reason, the mappers refer to it as the Midwest. Go Figure...

Michael Ballent
05-23-2005, 12:44 AM
Michael,

When I was in Scottsdale in March it did not appear to me as a "Western Town" other than an upcoming Rodeo and the "rawhide" (http://rawhide.com/) section of town.;)

The southern part of Scottsdale is the most western but the rest is AZ's version of Rodeo Drive :eek: Very glitzy.

Bill Lewis
05-23-2005, 6:34 AM
Isn't the "west" any place west of the Mississippi river (or at least it was a long time ago in a galaxy...)
That might explain why Ohio is "midwest"

Bill Arnold
05-23-2005, 7:58 AM
I'm not sure how Texas is referred to. ... ""God's Country, what else? :confused: :D

keith zimmerman
05-24-2005, 3:03 PM
So if Minnesota is called the northwest, what is Washington state? oh yeah, it's the Pacific Northwest. Go figure...

The colonists considered everything west of the Appalachians west. The Arch in St. Louis is the "Gateway to the West", so the midwest must be east of the Mississippi River. Kentucky is considered south, so the midwest must be north of the Ohio River. Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan are considered north, so the midwest must be south of the Great Lakes.

That makes the midwest the states of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.

keith

John Hart
05-24-2005, 3:08 PM
Let's not forget Texas... There's Texas and then there's the rest of y'all.

(My family lives there...I've been educated):rolleyes:

Per Swenson
05-24-2005, 4:16 PM
A little anecdote,
I grew up in Hells Kitchen, NYC. On 51st.
With a direct line of site to the Hudson river.
At about 5 years old the occasion came to ask
my nanny about Lions and Tigers and giraffes.
She of course replied Africa is where they live.
Next question, where is Africa?
Let me set the scene a little, she was English,
and at that moment I was looking west at the Hudson
when she replied "across the pond"
For the longest time you could not convince me
that New Jersey was not a dangerous jungle.

On another note, up until a couple of years ago,
entering Pennsylvania on route 80, there was a sign that read,
Welcome to Pennsylvania, America starts here.
I was glad I wasn't 5 when I first saw that sign.

Per

Bill Lewis
05-25-2005, 6:04 AM
Per,

Love your stories! Here's something I always wanted to know, why is it called "Hell's Kitchen" anyway. What's cookin'?

Keith Outten
05-25-2005, 8:06 AM
The first colonists landed at Old Point Comfort in Hampton Virginia, the oldest continually settled city in America. From Old Point Comfort they continued on and settled in Jamestown.

The first American Capitol was established in Williamsburg Virginia.

The Pensylvanians are confused as usual, you have to do better than just hosting a couple of meetings :)

The original boundaries for the North and South were determined by the division of the States at the beginning of the Civil War. Most of the States that call themselves "Southern" today were not States when the South was born, it is understandable why so many people are confused about where Dixieland really is, not to mention the West, Midwest and all the States that are youngsters :)

Seriously, America is so young a Nation and we have seen so much change in just two over hundred years it is understandable that we are confused. Consider that many Nations are thousands of years old, we don't even have one building in America that anyone would consider "Old".

Chip Olson
05-25-2005, 2:52 PM
I live just north of Boston, which of course is in New England. Not much confusion there.

Boston has its own geographical weirdness, though:
"The geographical center of Boston is in Roxbury. Due north of the center we find the South End. This is not to be confused with South Boston which lies directly east from the South End. North of the South End is East Boston and southwest of East Boston is the North End". Not to mention the West End, which no longer exists but was due north of the South End (and Allston and Brighton are miles west of it), and Back Bay and South Bay, both of which were filled in in the 1800's.

Michael Gibbons
05-29-2005, 7:15 PM
In Michigan we have "Up North" which is anything north of wyandotte. People who live in the "City" a.k.a. Detroit think I live up north which is 40 miles n. of Detroit. I always thought that up north was the Upper Pennisula and the northern third of the Lower. People who live in the U.P. call us southern folks "trolls" because we live below the bridge.:D

Lee DeRaud
05-29-2005, 8:45 PM
The first colonists landed at Old Point Comfort in Hampton Virginia, the oldest continually settled city in America.
Ok, I'm confused: I was always taught that the oldest was St. Augustine, FL.
http://www.historiography101.blogspot.com/2003_08_31_historiography101_archive.html

Keith Outten
05-29-2005, 9:16 PM
Lee,

From the link you posted in your response;

Hampton, Virginia: Located on the southeastern tip of the Virginia peninsula on the Chesapeake Bay, Hampton, Virginia is the oldest continuously settled English community in the United States. As an Indian village called Kecoughtan, it had been visited by the first English colonists before they sailed up the James River to settle in Jamestown. In 1610 the construction of Fort Henry and Fort Charles at the mouth of Hampton Creek marked the beginnings of Hampton. In 1619, the settlers chose an English name for the community, Elizabeth City. The settlement was known as Hampton as early as 1680, and in 1705, Hampton was recognized as a town.

St. Augustine is the oldest continuously occupied settlement of European origin in the United States.
Santa Fe is the oldest capital city in North America and also the oldest European city west of the Mississippi.
Jamestown Virginia was not continously settled.

The City of Hampton has designated 1610 as its official date of establisment. When I was born in 1951 my birth certificate shows my parents address in Elizabeth City County which was totally incorporated by the City of Hampton. Hampton in those days was what we call the Downtown area now, like most cities it incorporated the local area within the County but I am unsure of the date this happened other than it was definately after 1951. A large section of Elizabeth City County is now occupied by NACA (now NASA) and Langley Air Force Base which the local residents have always called Langley Field.

Fort Monroe was establised to keep the Spanish fleet and other European Nations from entering the body of water known as Hampton Roads and to protect the English settelments. As the English King later laid claim to all of the Colonies the other European Nations lost their claims to any and all settlements they had established.

Eventually the Revolutionary War ended all claims of ownership by any foreign countries.

Lee DeRaud
05-29-2005, 11:16 PM
Lee,

From the link you posted in your response;

Hampton, Virginia: Located on the southeastern tip of the Virginia peninsula on the Chesapeake Bay, Hampton, Virginia is the oldest continuously settled English community in the United States.

St. Augustine is the oldest continuously occupied settlement of European origin in the United States.
(shrug) If you meant "oldest English community", you could have just said so.

Keith Outten
05-30-2005, 7:08 AM
Sorry Lee, my statement was incomplete.

Lee DeRaud
05-30-2005, 10:11 AM
Sorry Lee, my statement was incomplete.No problem.
Speaking of "not knowing where they live", I lived in Virginia (Fairfax County) during the mid-60's. At the time, the area was in complete denial of prevailing climatic conditions. Being part of the "glorious South", allocating money for frivolities like snowplows was clearly something only a Yankee would suggest, leading to the area having about twice as many "snow days" off from school as the districts on the Maryland side of the Potomac.
(Note to Moderator: can I use the word "Yankee" on this forum? :))