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View Full Version : OK now I have seen everything, well not everything but something I have never seen



Van Huskey
03-24-2012, 4:44 PM
I was watching a movie set in Germany and saw a canal crossing OVER a river... strange. 3 seconds on Google and viola: the Magdeburg water bridge, another thing to add to my bucket list to see.

http://www.amusingplanet.com/2011/04/incredible-magdeburg-water-bridge-in.html

Bob Lloyd
03-24-2012, 4:57 PM
Van

There are a number of those back in my homeland

http://weburbanist.com/2011/09/04/slippery-when-wet-the-uks-top-10-navigable-aqueducts/

mike holden
03-25-2012, 11:36 AM
Hey Van, Go to Orlando Florida and as you approach the Magic Kingdom at Disney World, you go under a canal. Later you can rent a boat and cross over the road in a boat yourself. Used to be able to take a ferry, but Adventure Island morphed into the Animal Kingdom and the island zoo was closed.
Mike

Van Huskey
03-25-2012, 1:02 PM
Hey Van, Go to Orlando Florida and as you approach the Magic Kingdom at Disney World, you go under a canal. Later you can rent a boat and cross over the road in a boat yourself. Used to be able to take a ferry, but Adventure Island morphed into the Animal Kingdom and the island zoo was closed.
Mike

Funny enough I have actually ridden that. I guess I just don't see anything there as "real". It just hit me as "crazy" to see a large boat crossing over a river like that.

Douglas Clark
03-25-2012, 1:55 PM
That's crazy... as I was looking at the link that Bob had posted, I got to thinking that they kind of reminded me almost of a Disneyland ride... and then I saw Mike's post. It is funny how you sometimes experience something like that at Disneyland or another theme park and don't ever think of it being applicable on a larger scale, but I guess it's the same principle. Although those appeared to be some pretty sizable barges on the Madgeberg. I guess a four-way stop was out of the question there if they decided to spend that much on an overpass.

Greg Portland
03-25-2012, 3:56 PM
The C&O canal (Cumberland to DC) has a couple of (non functioning) aqueducts. I'd like to check out the Falkirk Wheel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falkirk_Wheel) in Scotland...

Lee Schierer
03-25-2012, 4:04 PM
Here's other one to add to that list. The Fallkirk Wheel..
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Here's a video of it working Wheel In Motion (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n61KUGDWz2A)

Bob Lloyd
03-25-2012, 4:12 PM
I'd like to check out the Falkirk Wheel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falkirk_Wheel) in Scotland...

I saw a program about that once. IIRC, it is so well balanced, it takes very little power to operate. Would be neat to see it in person, maybe on one of my trips home I could take a long trip north. As a civil engineer in a past life, I did get a close look at the Thames Barrier when it was being built, interesting trip.

Van Huskey
03-25-2012, 6:18 PM
Lee, the wheel is very cool too!

Douglas Clark
03-25-2012, 8:36 PM
...continually. Now that is supper cool. But if that doesn't look Disneyland-esque, nothing does.

Larry Frank
03-25-2012, 10:12 PM
There is one of those canals over a stream on the Whitewater Canal near Metamora, Indiana. Not too many people realize that there were a large number of canals in the US in the early 1800's to around the Civil War. The canal goes over the stream was at one time 460 miles long.

ray hampton
03-25-2012, 10:23 PM
I will watch any type of program if it involve heavy equipment[ no hijack intend ]one show were about open -pits mining in German I believe , the machine were too big to turn easy so they would remove any buildings or towns in its path ,remove the coal and fill in behind the machine and move every building back

Larry Edgerton
03-26-2012, 8:10 AM
Actually you do not have to go anywhere to see interesting works.

I live close to the Mackinaw Bridge, and before 911 I used to get up underneath and go across on the steel, go up across the cables and to the other side at night. It always amazed me, the shear magnatude, the conditions that it had to be built in, and its grace. Since 911 they have cameras and motion detectors under the bridge, and you are in big trouble if you do what I did. Thats ok, I'm too old now anyway, its a 5 mile hike.

There are many feats here that relate to the Iron and Copper mining days that are impressive. I have a perminent bump on my head from climbing down in an abandoned copper mine up in Hancock. That mine went 900 feet below Lake Superior. It is now full of water and I only went to lake level, but the things I saw were amazing. The museum there is well worth taking the time. and the car/train bridge over the river to allow freighters to go through the channel. And they have the worlds largest winch there, an interesting piece.

There is another Museum in Calumet that is worth the time as well. Those mines made everything on site. I mean everything, including the trains. This museum has a lot of woodwork from the pattern shop where they made wood patterns for all of the castings. There were so many that they used to sell them years ago. I have a gear prototype from there.

The upper peninsula of Michigan is one of the most interesting places you could visit from an industrial, man getting things accomplished sort of point of view. Its time has past, but its history is rich.

Larry

Jim Matthews
03-26-2012, 8:19 AM
This thread proves the unending depths of my ignorance.

I had no idea such works existed, in current use. The weight of the water in these spans must be staggering.

Lee Schierer
03-26-2012, 2:47 PM
Okay, here's one more. The Peterborough Lift Lock is a boat lift located on the Trent Canal in the city of Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, and is Lock 21 on the Trent-Severn Waterway. The dual lifts are the highest hydraulic boat lifts in the world, with a lift of 19.8 m (65 ft).228064

P.S. I've seen both this one and the Fallkirk Wheel.

John Coloccia
03-26-2012, 3:15 PM
Actually you do not have to go anywhere to see interesting works.

I live close to the Mackinaw Bridge, and before 911 I used to get up underneath and go across on the steel, go up across the cables and to the other side at night. It always amazed me, the shear magnatude, the conditions that it had to be built in, and its grace. Since 911 they have cameras and motion detectors under the bridge, and you are in big trouble if you do what I did. Thats ok, I'm too old now anyway, its a 5 mile hike.

There are many feats here that relate to the Iron and Copper mining days that are impressive. I have a perminent bump on my head from climbing down in an abandoned copper mine up in Hancock. That mine went 900 feet below Lake Superior. It is now full of water and I only went to lake level, but the things I saw were amazing. The museum there is well worth taking the time. and the car/train bridge over the river to allow freighters to go through the channel. And they have the worlds largest winch there, an interesting piece.

There is another Museum in Calumet that is worth the time as well. Those mines made everything on site. I mean everything, including the trains. This museum has a lot of woodwork from the pattern shop where they made wood patterns for all of the castings. There were so many that they used to sell them years ago. I have a gear prototype from there.

The upper peninsula of Michigan is one of the most interesting places you could visit from an industrial, man getting things accomplished sort of point of view. Its time has past, but its history is rich.

Larry

I've been meaning to get back to the UP sometime soon. It's such a cool place, and I miss the pasties. No, not THOSE pasties. These pasties: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasty

Ron Natalie
03-26-2012, 7:23 PM
That's not really a new concept. The C&O canal had eleven of these dating back ton 1828 of which ten still exist in some form.