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View Full Version : Any PEX experts out there??



Jeff Monson
03-22-2012, 4:49 PM
Looking for some insight on using pex for a cabin remodel I have going on. I bought most of my tubing and fittings, I'm a little confused on which ring type is best though. I picked up some 1/2" cinch style ring clamps and a cinch style compressor tool. The tool and the clamps were somewhat less expensive than the copper ring style, so that is why I chose the cinch style. I did a little experimenting with it today and thus my question. I put a 1/2" cinch clamp on some 1/2" tubing and made an elbow connection, the compressor tool I bought is a 1 handed ratcheting tool. When I get the clamp fully compressed I can still rotate the tubing on the fitting?? It feels like a good connection but I didnt think I should still be able to rotate it?

Maybe I'm just overthinking it...but I dont want 50 connections that drip water.

Any other tips or advice on working with pex would be greatly appreciated.

Brian Elfert
03-22-2012, 5:19 PM
I used the cinch style fittings with PEX for a plumbing project in a converted bus. Over 50% of them leaked. I used a non-ratcheting crimp tool. I ended up going with Sharkbite fittings from Home Depot instead.

John Lanciani
03-22-2012, 6:29 PM
I've never used the cinch style but I 've re-done most of my house using the copper compression rings (100+) and had zero leaks. I did spring for the better tool - looks and works like a pair of bolt cutters - figuring that I can sell it if I ever decide that I'm done with plumbing. The fittings can be turned but it takes a lot of effort to do so.

Larry Edgerton
03-22-2012, 8:21 PM
When I get the clamp fully compressed I can still rotate the tubing on the fitting?? It feels like a good connection but I didnt think I should still be able to rotate it?

Maybe I'm just overthinking it...but I dont want 50 connections that drip water.

Any other tips or advice on working with pex would be greatly appreciated.

The plumber on the house I am building now said that was normal to be able to rotate the pipe.

He only had twelve leaks, that we know of.......

Best of luck, Larry

Scott T Smith
03-22-2012, 8:57 PM
I've never used the cinch style but I 've re-done most of my house using the copper compression rings (100+) and had zero leaks. I did spring for the better tool - looks and works like a pair of bolt cutters - figuring that I can sell it if I ever decide that I'm done with plumbing. The fittings can be turned but it takes a lot of effort to do so.



+1, similar results with 100+ fittings.

Greg Peterson
03-22-2012, 10:54 PM
I used expansion fittings with a PEX compression ring, and the 'pipe' rotates without leaking.

The PEX fittings I used requires an expansion tool, that stretches the PEX wide enough to insert the ribbed fitting. Within thirty seconds or less the PEX memory creates a nice tight connection. It also uses a PEX compression ring to reinforce the connection. The compression ring is a piece of PEX tubing, about 1/2" - 3/4" long and the ID is the same as the OD of whatever size PEX tube you are using. Works nice.

michael a nelson
03-22-2012, 11:02 PM
my whole house is done in pex the trick is to get the tool that works like bolt cutters and crimp it several times on each ring rotating the tool around the ring as you go i have around 350 fittings and not one leak in is normal though to be able to rotate the fitting while in the pipe

Brian J. Elliott
03-25-2012, 3:02 AM
I use both of the crimp too;s discussed and the pex expansion rings on a daily basis. It is normal for the fitting to spin after crimped. I advise diyer's to use the cinch tool simply because one tool works for all sizes of pex. I prefer the Wirsibo ring system, while using a 18v cordless expander. Over the course of a 12 hour day, crimping pex fittings get old fast and it's hard on the hands.

Pex is very easy to work with. Just take your time and fit your ring properly and get a good crimp. If anything requires the fitting be soldered, solder the piece and allow plenty of time for it to cool before fitting your pex to it.

Jeff Monson
03-25-2012, 8:30 PM
I use both of the crimp too;s discussed and the pex expansion rings on a daily basis. It is normal for the fitting to spin after crimped. I advise diyer's to use the cinch tool simply because one tool works for all sizes of pex. I prefer the Wirsibo ring system, while using a 18v cordless expander. Over the course of a 12 hour day, crimping pex fittings get old fast and it's hard on the hands.

Pex is very easy to work with. Just take your time and fit your ring properly and get a good crimp. If anything requires the fitting be soldered, solder the piece and allow plenty of time for it to cool before fitting your pex to it.

Brian, thanks a million for that answer. I've been contimplating returning the cinch rings and tool for the copper rings. I will stick with what I have and give it a shot.

Bob Vavricka
03-25-2012, 10:59 PM
I've used the cinch tool without any problem, but I've only done maybe 25 fittings. The fittings will rotate, but its never caused me any leaks.