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Lee Schierer
03-22-2012, 12:15 PM
Our old grill is getting to the point where we may need to replace it this year. We were at one of the borgs and looked at their offerings. Has anyone tried one of the infra red grills? The reviews on line seem mixed people either hate it or love it, there don't seem to be any in between. The biggest complaints seem to be rust and difficulty cleaning.

Since there are normally just two of use we aren't looking for a 5-6 burner unit one with 2 or 3 burners would suit us just fine and we don't want to pay $1000+ for one. We would also like to add a rotisserie.

What is the best grill out there?

Bryan Slimp
03-22-2012, 2:03 PM
You probably should have started a less controversial thread - like a good SawStop cost benefit thread.

I vote propane with the add on rotisserie. I've never been a fan of side burners and would trade it for a light or rotisserie any day.

Greg Portland
03-22-2012, 2:41 PM
Our old grill is getting to the point where we may need to replace it this year. We were at one of the borgs and looked at their offerings. Has anyone tried one of the infra red grills? The reviews on line seem mixed people either hate it or love it, there don't seem to be any in between. The biggest complaints seem to be rust and difficulty cleaning.

Since there are normally just two of use we aren't looking for a 5-6 burner unit one with 2 or 3 burners would suit us just fine and we don't want to pay $1000+ for one. We would also like to add a rotisserie.

What is the best grill out there?
Yes, I've used infrared and it heats up the grill much faster than gas. Some infrared units make it hard to get -low- temperatures for fish, veggies, etc.

The reason you're seeing complaints about rust is because people keep their grills outside. Sub-$1k grills are not going to be 100% stainless and you're going to end up with rust. A cover will slow the oxidation process but will not prevent it.

A good rotisserie attachment (good motor, good clamping mechanism for food, etc.) is a great addition to your grill. I agree that a rear burner to avoid flare ups is a nice to have with a rotisserie.

All the big names (Weber, Char Broil, etc.) are made overseas now. I'm a fan of Weber but am not sure if they offer infrared at this price point.

Personally, I like ceramic BBQs + charcoal. They hold temperatures much better in cold/windy/snowy conditions and ceramic doesn't rust :-). Personally, I feel that charcoal is a must... otherwise I might as well use the oven or a grill top on my kitchen stove. Primo and Big Green Egg are two ceramic BBQ makers that fall into your price range ($<1k).

Brian Elfert
03-22-2012, 3:29 PM
I had a small Holland portable grill that was infrared. I sold it or took it back because I hated it. A full size model might work better. I don't know. I can't recall anymore exactly what was so bad about it. I think it took forever to cook.

Chris Damm
03-23-2012, 9:20 AM
I have 2 Weber Silvers. They are a 2 burner grill. I am very happy with them. I use the 2nd for back up at family gatherings. The one I use almost 3-4 times a week is 8 years old. I have replaced the burners and flavorizer bars. The back up is about 15 years old and when I found a source for inexpensive parts I rebuilt that one too. They were in the less than $300 range when I got them.

Ron Natalie
03-23-2012, 9:43 AM
I have a Kalamazoo Gourmet (no IR but it does have a lot of BTUs) built into the outdoor kitchen and I also have a Grill Dome (a version of the ceramic "egg" cooker). If you want fast, I can get the Grill Dome up to 600 degrees pretty quickly. There's a school of thought that says after you sear the stakes at that temperature you should let them rest for 20 minutes which is about how long it takes me to get the dome back down to 200 to finish them off.

Anthony Whitesell
03-24-2012, 3:14 PM
We (the LOML and I) are also in need of a new grill. My parents have a non-lava rock/ceramic briquette grill that's a few years old. Everything has a tinge of propane to it. They laid an old grate over the flavorizer bars and covered it with small lava rock pieces. Everything tastes much better.

Does anyone know if they make propane grills that have lava rocks or ceramic briquettes? Are the newer grills that don't require the rocks any better than my parents grill? I'm currently leaning towards a CharBroil Infrared grill (I believe it is this one http://www.lowes.com/pd_94772-82210-463243812_0__?catalogId=10051&productId=3511539&UserSearch=94772&Ntt=94772&N=0&langId=-1&storeId=10151&rpp=24). Your thoughts?

Ron Natalie
03-24-2012, 4:05 PM
I'm not sure what propane tastes like. The Kalamazoo has ceramic bars when you're not using the wood/charcoal drawers. The one I use at the office for parking lot cookouts is one of those Lowe's char broil from a few years ago. Not noticed any problem except to note that there's a feature on the newer propane stuff that limits the flow rate if the thing thinks there is a leak somewhere which can make the grill light but never get really hot. You have to shutdown everything, close the tank valve, unhook the regulator from the tank and start over. Got bit by that once before I knew what it was.

The KG is plumbed directly to the 1000 Gallon propane tank in the side yard.

Harry Hagan
03-24-2012, 5:12 PM
Its a little out of your price range but Id go with a 2012 MAK 2 Star General with remote control.

Myk Rian
03-24-2012, 6:12 PM
It’s a little out of your price range but I’d go with a 2012 MAK 2 Star General with remote control.
He said $1,000. Geese. That thing is $2,300. That's a LITTLE out of his range?

Larry Frank
03-24-2012, 9:41 PM
I have a Weber propane three burner with the flavor bars and cast iron grill. We use it all year around and it sits in the weather. During the winter, I have to shovel the back porch to get to it. My first one lasted 12 plus years and the current one is about 5 years with no corrosion. I am not certain that covering them helps with corrosion as it keeps the moisture in also. The cover probably keeps some of the dirt off but I am not concerned.

I love the rotisserie and plan to make a pork roast on it tomorrow. I have a small smoker box that I use and it adds some smoke to the meat.

charlie knighton
03-24-2012, 10:05 PM
i have a smokey joe by weber, had it over 10 years, had to replace the grill that the charcoal rests on last year, no rotisserie but i only do 97/3 hamburger, pork chop, or sirloin, no chicken or corn on the cob about $25 when i bought it, replacement grill for charcoal was that much last year. no rust, leave it out in summer, basement in winter, probably need to get it out since i put my tomatoes out yesterday

Van Huskey
03-25-2012, 12:25 AM
He said $1,000. Geese. That thing is $2,300. That's a LITTLE out of his range?

Thats par for the course in the power tool forum... :D

Jerry Thompson
03-25-2012, 8:28 AM
227994

Here is one of the Primo model's we use around here.:rolleyes:

Ron Natalie
03-25-2012, 10:24 AM
Gives a whole new definition to the term ceramic cooker.

Harry Hagan
03-25-2012, 1:39 PM
He said $1,000. Geese. That thing is $2,300. That's a LITTLE out of his range?

No. I said with the remote. That would make it $2,700

Ricky Rater
03-25-2012, 2:44 PM
I have a New Phoenix Grill which is an indirect cooker designed similarly to the New Holland (which my dad has). Both brands have a cast aluminum drip pan between the flame and the food. The main difference between the two is that the New Phoenix it has more burner so it gets hotter. I have the SD model which is 100% SS or cast aluminum (even the axle for the wheels is aluminum).

It cooks differently than any other grill I've used but we have enjoyed it so far. Grills a good steak and does some unique things that I don't know are possible on other grills - I cooked the Thanksgiving turkey on it last year.

My second choice was a Weber - forget the model number. But they are very well built and they use good materials.

One of the main deciding factors for me was corrosion resistance as we live near the coast.