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View Full Version : Small Deep Fryer that will get hot enough?



Stephen Tashiro
11-20-2011, 5:17 PM
In shopping for a small deep fryer on the Amazon site, I notice that the reviews of small fryers consistently criticize them for not being able to hold a high enough temperature. (For example: a review of "Deni 9301 Mini 840-Watt 1-1/4-Quart Stainless-Steel Deep Fryer" makes that complaint.)

I don't want big deep fryer. Are sub-par cooking temperatures a fact of life with small deep fryers? After all, they are small so they won't hold heat as well as big ones. When cold food is put in them, it seems natural that their temperature drops. Is there a model of small deep fryer that recovers to the proper frying temperature quickly?

Bill Edwards(2)
11-20-2011, 8:12 PM
We never had any trouble with a Fry Daddy.:D

Stephen Tashiro
11-20-2011, 9:32 PM
We never had any trouble with a Fry Daddy.:D

Did you measure the frying temperature or are only saying that you like how it fries? On the Amazon site, there are many positive reviews of the small fryers by people that aren't concerned with frying temperatures. However, I'd like to get one that gets to and holds the recommended temperature.

One reviewer of Fry Daddy wrote "Nice idea but does not get hot enough. By my fry thermometer it tops out at 290 degrees F. This is to low for proper frying, sorry."

Joe Angrisani
11-20-2011, 10:05 PM
What about a quality, heavy, clad pan? This is one of those instances where "yet another specialized kitchen gizmo" really isn't necessary. A quality pan on the stovetop will work just the same, if not better because you can crank the heat after adding something to the fryer so you get back up to temp faster.

I have All-Clad pans I've had for twenty years and I've deep fried in everything from my smallest saucepan to my large dutch oven. As I recall, Walmart is currently selling a heavyweight clad pan line than is right up there with the All-Clad stuff in reviews, and all at 1/6th the cost.

Bill Cunningham
11-20-2011, 10:26 PM
We have a small Cuisinart (bought at Sears) that seems to work well.. It holds it's temperature providing you don't overload it to a silly extent.. There's just my wife and I, and we find it works quick, and I rarely have to wait for it to reheat between loads..

Phil Thien
11-20-2011, 10:29 PM
A friend is sort of an expert on this and he has told me there are no small models with a fast recovery. He said adding frozen product to a small batch of oil drops the temp. too fast, and the heaters are incapable of getting the temperature back up at a fast enough rate.

Chris Damm
11-21-2011, 8:34 AM
Did you measure the frying temperature or are only saying that you like how it fries? On the Amazon site, there are many positive reviews of the small fryers by people that aren't concerned with frying temperatures. However, I'd like to get one that gets to and holds the recommended temperature.

One reviewer of Fry Daddy wrote "Nice idea but does not get hot enough. By my fry thermometer it tops out at 290 degrees F. This is to low for proper frying, sorry."
My Fry Daddy runs right around 350. I've found that you have to have a good thermometer to measure the temp. The ones that come with most small fryers are not very accurate.

Ron Natalie
11-21-2011, 10:58 AM
Depends what you're frying but 325 and able to get back to it quickly when you put food in it is ideal.

Bill Edwards(2)
11-21-2011, 12:04 PM
Did you measure the frying temperature or are only saying that you like how it fries? On the Amazon site, there are many positive reviews of the small fryers by people that aren't concerned with frying temperatures. However, I'd like to get one that gets to and holds the recommended temperature.

One reviewer of Fry Daddy wrote "Nice idea but does not get hot enough. By my fry thermometer it tops out at 290 degrees F. This is to low for proper frying, sorry."

"Nice idea"? It's been around over 30 years.

Unless you're competing with KFC, it will do want you want. :cool:

Greg Portland
11-21-2011, 2:25 PM
In shopping for a small deep fryer on the Amazon site, I notice that the reviews of small fryers consistently criticize them for not being able to hold a high enough temperature. (For example: a review of "Deni 9301 Mini 840-Watt 1-1/4-Quart Stainless-Steel Deep Fryer" makes that complaint.)

I don't want big deep fryer. Are sub-par cooking temperatures a fact of life with small deep fryers? After all, they are small so they won't hold heat as well as big ones. When cold food is put in them, it seems natural that their temperature drops. Is there a model of small deep fryer that recovers to the proper frying temperature quickly?The oil should definitely get hot enough in all these machines. The problem occurs when you drop cold food into the oil; the low amperage machines can't get the temp back up. If the oil isn't hot then breaded food gets soggy. Potatoes (fries) and chicken (buffalo wings) -REALLY- absorb a lot of heat & are the most problematic foods to cook in these small friers. You can get around the issue by cooking very small batches.

Note: Most of these fryers make a mess ("grease steam" coats everything, etc.). Use these under a big range hood or outdoors.

I would consider a small commercial 20A fryer if you've got a 20A circuit in the kitchen. It looks like the cheap options are not made very well but they'll at least keep the oil hot.:
http://www.amazon.com/CUISINAIRRE-COMMERCIAL-ELECTRIC-FRYER-2500W/dp/B0054LA8DE/ref=pd_sim_sbs_k_4

Stephen Tashiro
11-21-2011, 3:26 PM
Depends what you're frying but 325 and able to get back to it quickly when you put food in it is ideal.

I'm interested mainly in french fries. The recommended temperature for them that I see on the web is 375 F.

Peter Kelly
11-21-2011, 3:32 PM
What about a quality, heavy, clad pan? This is one of those instances where "yet another specialized kitchen gizmo" really isn't necessary. A quality pan on the stovetop will work just the same, if not better because you can crank the heat after adding something to the fryer so you get back up to temp faster.

I have All-Clad pans I've had for twenty years and I've deep fried in everything from my smallest saucepan to my large dutch oven. As I recall, Walmart is currently selling a heavyweight clad pan line than is right up there with the All-Clad stuff in reviews, and all at 1/6th the cost.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-12-Qt.-18-10-TriPly-Clad-Stainless-Steel-Stock-Pot-80116-517/5716479

Much of my stuff is All-Clad too but ^this looked not bad for the price.

Joe Angrisani
11-22-2011, 9:48 AM
Yep, Peter. That's the heavyweight Walmart line.

Seriously, people. Lose the countertop gadgets with their wee heating elements. Fry in a heavy pan with your stove's high-amp heating element.

John Lohmann
11-22-2011, 11:36 AM
Deep Dutch ovens are the way to go, most fryers can't maintain 325, I have a $125 one in a cabinet. I researched, the reviews were great, not hot enough for wings. Cast iron dutch oven is the way to go

Joel Goodman
11-22-2011, 4:39 PM
Cast iron rocks, but has anyone else noticed that the old Wagner cast iron pans -- sadly no longer made -- are ground smooth inside so things don't stick while the Lodge available now is rough. Although it will not matter for deep frying.

John Lohmann
11-22-2011, 4:57 PM
Cast iron rocks, but has anyone else noticed that the old Wagner cast iron pans -- sadly no longer made -- are ground smooth inside so things don't stick while the Lodge available now is rough. Although it will not matter for deep frying.
Add porcelain & wait for a sell from lodge, can't afford the french stuff

Greg Portland
11-22-2011, 4:58 PM
Cast iron rocks, but has anyone else noticed that the old Wagner cast iron pans -- sadly no longer made -- are ground smooth inside so things don't stick while the Lodge available now is rough. Although it will not matter for deep frying.You can fix this with a rotary sander. I've done it to all my modern Lodge cookware & then re-seasoned...

Tim Morton
11-24-2011, 7:17 AM
The problem with amazon reviews is that too may people just LOVE to chime in the negative, maybe to make themselves feel superior or something i don't know. While it may or not be true that some people feel that in order to make an edible french fry, it must be cooked at exactly 275 degree's +/- .00005125 for exactly 4.5 minutes. The real truth is that a $12 fry daddy makes a pretty tasty french fry....don't get bogged down in the weeds...you will spend all your time shopping and never get to enjoy the fries of your labor.

Stephen Tashiro
11-24-2011, 12:59 PM
The problem with amazon reviews is that too may people just LOVE to chime in the negative, maybe to make themselves feel superior or something i don't know.



I think that's a strength of the Amazon reviews. I find that negative reviews are usually specific. I don't always care about the negative aspects that are mentioned, but I like to consider them. If you look at the positive reviews of Fry Daddy, how many of those reviewers bothered to measure the frying temperature?




While it may or not be true that some people feel that in order to make an edible french fry, it must be cooked at exactly 275 degree's +/- .00005125 for exactly 4.5 minutes. The real truth is that a $12 fry daddy makes a pretty tasty french fry....don't get bogged down in the weeds...you will spend all your time shopping and never get to enjoy the fries of your labor.

You could also say that particle board makes pretty good furniture. People set their own standards for how well to do things. If they can maintain an even keel eating Fry Daddy fries, that's fine. If they seek the perfect 375 F frying temperature, that's fine too.

Shopping is interesting and healthier than eating fries.

Joe Angrisani
11-24-2011, 3:21 PM
...you will spend all your time shopping and never get to enjoy the fries of your labor.

One could say it's the "frites" of one's labors. Oui oui.

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone......