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Belinda Williamson
08-17-2010, 12:03 PM
As if today marking the 41st anniversary of the last day of Woodstock (not that I was there) didn't make me feel old enough here's this.

The Beloit College Mindset List for the Class of 2014

Not so long now, but I can't change the title. Decided to just post the link instead. No Benny Hill? No Sam Kinison? You can also look check out the year of your choice.

http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2014.php

Mitchell Andrus
08-17-2010, 12:14 PM
My youngest was born in 1991.

I often think about all the 'stuff' that's happened during my grandmother's 94 years. Yikes.
.

Rich Stewart
08-17-2010, 1:37 PM
My mom told me that they would let school out whenever a plane flew over. That's in just one lifetime.

Belinda Williamson
08-17-2010, 2:00 PM
When I was growing up it was so exciting to get letters and postcards. There was just something about seeing my name on the envelope and knowing that inside was a letter written just to me. Getting the mass notification on facebook about a friend's visit to Paris just isn't the same somehow, and neither is the e-mail. :(

Jim Koepke
08-17-2010, 2:42 PM
I have received this in e-mails and is all over the internet if you look for > A stunning senior moment < Occasionally it is found with a little bit stronger wording at the end.

A self-important college freshmen walking along the beach took it upon himself to explain to a senior citizen resting on the steps why it was impossible for the older generation to understand his generation.
”You grew up in a different world, actually an almost primitive one”, the student said loud enough for others to hear.
The young people of today grew up with television, jet planes, space travel, man walking on the moon. We have nuclear energy, ships and cell phones, computers with light speed and so much more.”
After a brief silence, the senior citizen responded as follows:
“You’re right son. We didn’t have those things when we were young, so we invented them. Now, you arrogant child what are you doing for the next generation?”

jim

Dave Anderson NH
08-17-2010, 3:39 PM
I was a member of the Woodstock Generation, the wood stock was on my M14 rifle.

Seriously though, I remember my grandfather who was born in 1891 and died in 1989 at a few months short of his 98 birthday. He went from horse and buggy and gas lights to electricity and all of its wonders, radio, TV, 2 world wars, automobiles, aircraft, and men landing on the moon. I doubt that any other generation in history will ever again see such a wide range of advancements in the quality of life and the increase of the average person's life span. The adjustments required of our generation seem puny by comparison.

Tom Winship
08-17-2010, 3:42 PM
Today, when we want to order something, we just get on the web and order it. We get notification that it is being shipped and the shipping status is updated until it arrives at your door.

When a child you ordered from Sears (or someone) on an order form which was mailed along with the check or money order (do they still make those) It was an adventure because you wondered 1) Had the order made it to the seller 2)Had the goods been shipped, and 3) Had the goods arrived at the post office. This made for a couple of weeks of entertainment.

That taught patience, something we have lost along the way.

Jim Rimmer
08-17-2010, 4:55 PM
I was a member of the Woodstock Generation, the wood stock was on my M14 rifle.

Seriously though, I remember my grandfather who was born in 1891 and died in 1989 at a few months short of his 98 birthday. He went from horse and buggy and gas lights to electricity and all of its wonders, radio, TV, 2 world wars, automobiles, aircraft, and men landing on the moon. I doubt that any other generation in history will ever again see such a wide range of advancements in the quality of life and the increase of the average person's life span. The adjustments required of our generation seem puny by comparison.
My grandfather's brother (who was like a second granfather to me) was born in 1901 and was always fascinated by airplanes. He would always stop to watch a crop duster. He lived to see man walk on the moon.

Mitchell Andrus
08-17-2010, 5:16 PM
I was a member of the Woodstock Generation, the wood stock was on my M14 rifle.

Seriously though, I remember my grandfather who was born in 1891 and died in 1989 at a few months short of his 98 birthday. He went from horse and buggy and gas lights to electricity and all of its wonders, radio, TV, 2 world wars, automobiles, aircraft, and men landing on the moon. I doubt that any other generation in history will ever again see such a wide range of advancements in the quality of life and the increase of the average person's life span. The adjustments required of our generation seem puny by comparison.

Couldn't have said it better. I wish people would just sit down and stop complaining.
.

Mitchell Andrus
08-17-2010, 5:18 PM
Today, when we want to order something, we just get on the web and order it. We get notification that it is being shipped and the shipping status is updated until it arrives at your door.

When a child you ordered from Sears (or someone) on an order form which was mailed along with the check or money order (do they still make those) It was an adventure because you wondered 1) Had the order made it to the seller 2)Had the goods been shipped, and 3) Had the goods arrived at the post office. This made for a couple of weeks of entertainment.

That taught patience, something we have lost along the way.

I miss shipping a roll of film out in a yellow envelope and getting prints back.
.

Matt Meiser
08-17-2010, 5:21 PM
Sunday my daughter asked what "One Hour Photo was. My wife told her to think about it.

She did, and replied "It takes ONE HOUR to download your pictures there?!?"

Belinda Williamson
08-18-2010, 7:40 AM
I miss shipping a roll of film out in a yellow envelope and getting prints back.
.

Mitchell, get out of my head! I was just thinking yesterday about that. I couldn't remember where I got the envelopes. I loved finding a roll of film stuck back somewhere and wondering what was on it.

Dennis Peacock
08-18-2010, 8:07 AM
Mitchell, get out of my head! I was just thinking yesterday about that. I couldn't remember where I got the envelopes. I loved finding a roll of film stuck back somewhere and wondering what was on it.

Shoot, I used to develop my film into a roll of negatives, then load them into the projector in the darkroom and open a package of paper and start exposing the images from film to paper, then washing each paper piece in the various "timed" solutions to develop it into a real photo. Black and white still makes some of the most awesome pictures ever...IMHO.....but developing color was a whole new set of challenges. :)

I miss the days of mailing off my film and getting the prints back too.