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Belinda Williamson
06-05-2009, 9:39 AM
Got an e-mail from a friend yesterday - "Help, my stepsister is getting married and I need a wedding gift."

No problem, we'll just engrave the invitation on this lovely glass photo frame and you're good to go. When's the wedding? Saturday. When are you leaving? Tomorrow.

Am I the only one who has that moment of panic just before hitting the start button? I have only one frame, so no back up and no time to order a replacement if I goof up. Double check settings - check. Mirrored for reverse engraving - check. Proof read ONE MORE TIME - check. Correct placement of frame for engraving - check. Still, just before I hit start I feel that sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach.

Please tell me I'm not alone!

Tim Bateson
06-05-2009, 9:43 AM
Yep, you are all alone, I just press start and don't think twice about it....... Then I panic trying to find a new frame. :o

nancy barry
06-05-2009, 9:44 AM
Can you do this on a plain piece of window glass first? Even though I mostly laser glass, I always do a test on window glass before I commit to the more expensive glass.

I experience this "panic" feeling when I attempt new materials. I "know" others laser wood and acrylics and paper and matt board and ..... all the time.. but, for me, there is a huge "what if I damage the laser" factor associated with hitting the print button..

I am sure the gift will look great and bring lots of joy and happiness to both figiver and new couple..

nancyB

Martin Boekers
06-05-2009, 10:03 AM
Belinda,

Like Tim, I usually don't panic when I push the button.

Panic usually occurs after I lift the lid to remove the piece!


Marty

Mike Null
06-05-2009, 10:05 AM
What? Me worry? :eek:

Doug Griffith
06-05-2009, 10:17 AM
I'm with you Belinda. For me, it is far greater on a CNC where the machine can do serious damage to itself if things go wrong. If I only have one item to laser, I run the job on scrap first.

Cheers,
Doug

Belinda Williamson
06-05-2009, 10:26 AM
I'm with you Belinda. For me, it is far greater on a CNC where the machine can do serious damage to itself if things go wrong. If I only have one item to laser, I run the job on scrap first.

Cheers,
Doug

Don't even get me started on the CNC Doug!

I ran the job first on posterboard.

Andrea Weissenseel
06-05-2009, 11:12 AM
Belinda, I'm a member of this Club as well :D

Craig B Smith
06-05-2009, 1:17 PM
The policy around our shop is: "Never engrave something you can't afford to replace". We do make an exception for a custom knife maker who has knives that sell for more than I would care to spend. Even though he says he can fix anything we goof up... there is always that moment of second guessing. :rolleyes:

Brian Jones FL
06-05-2009, 1:37 PM
if I ever have concerns like that I put painters tape on the item and run it at just enough power to mark the tape.. that way there's no question what my result will be when I switch back to the right settings for what i'm engraving.

Brian Robison
06-05-2009, 2:17 PM
Yep painters tape and I also use heavy paper. What is it 60lb.? Sumthin like that.

Lenin Alvarez
06-05-2009, 5:38 PM
if I ever have concerns like that I put painters tape on the item and run it at just enough power to mark the tape.. that way there's no question what my result will be when I switch back to the right settings for what i'm engraving.

I use poliester masking tape usually orange and semi transparent which let me see the exact position of the engraving before hitting the button, u usually engrave to the tape with low power and ppi enought to mark the tape without touchin the glass

Mike Chance in Iowa
06-05-2009, 5:51 PM
Please tell me I'm not alone!

Yup. No matter how many tests I run or how many times I double-check it, when I know I have only one shot at it, I am still hesitant to hit the Go button. Once I hit Go, I can only watch it for a few seconds to make sure it starts okay and then I can't watch it engrave. I have to look away until it's finished.

Some could say I'm being over-cautious, but I know from past experience that even if I have checked it multiple times, I have still had a few incidents that ended with an Oops. (It can be as simple as pressing Ctrl+Z to undo your last edit when you thought you pressed Ctrl+S to save.)

Tim Bateson
06-05-2009, 6:02 PM
Once I hit Go, I can only watch it for a few seconds to make sure it starts okay and then I can't watch it engrave. I have to look away until it's finished.

Not me. I'm still mesmerized by the laser. I've wasted more time just watching it do it's magic. At the same time, I've hit the stop button a few times just in time to save a piece... sometimes a few seconds late.:p

John Noell
06-05-2009, 6:09 PM
Just got a super rush job last week, guy flying to his mother's 80th birthday and wanting a gold-lettered plaque (to go on a fancy custom made bible stand) on a wood I've never lasered before. Only one piece of the wood. Checked, re-checked, ran it light on blue tape, then *GULP* hit Go. It came our beautifully and my bood pressure dropped back to normal. Sigh.

Frank Corker
06-05-2009, 6:46 PM
Trust in your abilities grasshopper

David Fairfield
06-05-2009, 6:57 PM
They key to remaining calm before hitting buttons is to hit them without thinking. :o

Dave

John W. Love
06-06-2009, 1:19 AM
Trust in your abilities grasshopper

Ahh so, Frank, the ever wise Sensei. Ever present with an expert word of advise. I think the definition suits you well Master. /bow
per Wiki...
Sensei (先生 (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E5%85%88%E7%94%9F)? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:Japanese)) is a Japanese (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_language) title (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_titles) used to refer to or address teachers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teacher), professors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professor), professionals such as lawyers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawyer) and doctors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physician), politicians (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politician), clergymen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clergyman), and other figures of authority. The word is also used to show respect to someone who has achieved a certain level of mastery in an art form or some other skill.

onur cakir
06-06-2009, 5:05 AM
i engrave first
than i ask questions :cool:

Tom Gooch
06-06-2009, 7:34 PM
Certainly had moments of panic, but usually they were at that moment you realized that you'd just ruined a piece because you forgot to..... As time has gone on though, those moments are fewer fewer thanks to contributions to this forum. I can't thank creekers enough for all the help and tips, I've found here.

Bill Cunningham
06-06-2009, 9:40 PM
On every 'one off' plaque, granite, marble, glass, etc.. I use either blue tape, or transfer paper blackened with liquid shoe polish or black Colorcure turtle wax polish cut 50/50 with water, run it a 100sp & low power just to mark the tape.. Sure it takes a little bit of time, but hey! ya only got one, and Murphy and his 3000 gremlins haunt my shop.. They keep moving stuff on me, I put it down, and it's GONE!!! The older I get, the harder those damn gremlins work to keep me looking for stuff I just had in my hand!!!:mad:

Darren Null
06-07-2009, 11:52 AM
Tie on the rising sun headband, have a big swig of sake and go for it!
Tora, tora, tora! Oops.

Leigh Costello
06-07-2009, 3:05 PM
Belinda, if I don't feel nervous, I re-check and run a practice piece then I re-check, close my eyes as soon as I hit the button then wait to look. Works very well for me, of course you must then dose yourself with a frosty cold beverage at the end of the day.;)