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Johnny Pearce
06-03-2009, 12:23 AM
I bought new stainless steel appliances for our home remodeling 3 years ago. They have been in a non climatized storage building in central Texas during the remodel. Recently I installed them and after removing the protective film I have lines of glue residue where there were wrinkles in the film. Does any one here know of a product or way of cleaning that will not stain or harm the brushed stainless steel finish?

David G Baker
06-03-2009, 12:43 AM
Home Depot sells some ZEP products and one of them is a stainless steel cleaner/polisher. I used it in the motion picture film processing lab that I managed to clean chemical spills off of the stainless processing equipment. Regular stores may also carry a cleaner for stainless in the cleanser isles.

Eric Larsen
06-03-2009, 12:49 AM
Finally!

Someone asks a question where I'm pretty sure I'm the expert.

Go to the local micro brewery and ask VERY NICELY for about two ounces of Powdered Brewery Wash. This stuff is very expensive and goes a long way. If the brewer tells you, "We use caustic" -- quit drinking there.

Mix one ounce into half a gallon of 120f water and wash your stainless. Use a clean rag. Rinse the rag out often as not to ruin the PBW in your bucket.

If you need to, rinse and then make a fresh batch and do it again. Rinse with water at the same temperature as your solution.

This stuff was made for cleaning 401 stainless to near-laboratory cleanliness without any pitting/staining/etc.


Edit -

Here's a link, just in case you don't have a brewpub nearby: http://www.homebrewers.com/product/6024?meta=FRG&utm_source=GBASE&utm_medium=CPC&utm_content=&utm_campaign=

I used to buy this stuff by the ton. Now I just clean my pots and pans with it. (Sigh. One year and counting, no brewing jobs have opened up here.)

Bill Keehn
06-03-2009, 9:14 AM
I use the same stuff David uses for getting rid of finger prints and smudges and putting a nice shine on the stainless that seems to last. I don't know how good it is for sticky glue residue - haven't tried it for that.

For adhesive label removal I always reach for my bottle of Goo Gone first. It's also sold at Home Depot.

Lee Mitchell
06-03-2009, 9:31 AM
Try vegetable oil and a soft cloth. This works for removing some types of glue. In any event, it won't hurt anything to give it a try. Follow that with alcohol or Windex or wash with warm soapy (Dawn) water to remove the oil film.

Hope this helps.

Lee

Chuck Saunders
06-03-2009, 9:38 AM
goo gone to remove the adhesive, club soda to wipe down the stainless

Johnny Pearce
06-03-2009, 12:10 PM
Thanks for the help. We had already used Dawn soapy warm water with soft cloth and bleach free Clorox Disinfecting wipes. We can still see where there was no film applied and where it was applied and where there were wrinkles in the protective film. I have GooGone and use it to remove adhesive residue from many things but I was concerned about using it on stainless. My experience with stainless steel is limited but I have seen it streak and discolor from spills of oils or chemicals.
Eric, I did order the PBW late last night from The-Bruhaus on the net. It sounds like the answer to my particular situation. THANKS I will post my results.
I am going to find an inconspicuous place and try the GooGone also.
Again, Thanks for the time and suggestions from everyone,
John

Eric Larsen
06-03-2009, 1:55 PM
Thanks for the help. We had already used Dawn soapy warm water with soft cloth and bleach free Clorox Disinfecting wipes. We can still see where there was no film applied and where it was applied and where there were wrinkles in the protective film. I have GooGone and use it to remove adhesive residue from many things but I was concerned about using it on stainless. My experience with stainless steel is limited but I have seen it streak and discolor from spills of oils or chemicals.
Eric, I did order the PBW late last night from The-Bruhaus on the net. It sounds like the answer to my particular situation. THANKS I will post my results.
I am going to find an inconspicuous place and try the GooGone also.
Again, Thanks for the time and suggestions from everyone,
John

Just make sure you rinse with a clean rag (no PBW on it) using water the same temperature as your PBW solution -- otherwise PBW forms a white powdery film that takes several rinses to remove.

Hit the appliances with some Shiela Shine afterwards. (But no Shiela Shine anywhere were actual cooking or food contact happens. Only where you're just looking for it to be pretty.)

Tom Godley
06-03-2009, 3:21 PM
This may sound odd - but I use " Hercules for Hands".

They are pre-moistened hand wipes that come in a plastic container - I originally picked them up at the local plumbing store years ago because they would remove PVC glue from your hands -- but they are also recommended as specialized cleaning wipes. I am never without them -- also great for cleaning off new tools!

I used them to do a major cleaning of the stainless hood over my indoor grill - nothing else worked! Now I use them for all kinds cleaning.

You need to use a product that will remove the glue - many of the stainless cleaners are not that strong.

What ever you do make sure that your appliances are actually stainless and not stainless look -- as many are aluminum and can be damaged by some cleaners.

Cliff Rohrabacher
06-03-2009, 6:02 PM
Someone asks a question where I'm pretty sure I'm the expert.

That's always nice isn't it?


Powdered Brewery Wash. This stuff is very expensive and goes a long way.

That stuff is 30% Sodium Metasilicate ( http://www.fivestarchemicals.com/msds/pbw.pdf )

If you are into the chemistry here is a good book and it's fgree online:
http://books.google.com/books?id=dXn3aB1DKk4C&pg=PA401&lpg=PA401&dq=what+is+Sodium+Metasilicate+is+it+a+caustic%3F&source=bl&ots=eOdpTjGWv6&sig=eGO64GVPhBfnSS3qxxCSZJXBWWA&hl=en&ei=cOEmSp72EYia9QTM9dCBDw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9#PPP1,M1


If the brewer tells you, "We use caustic" -- quit drinking there.

Why? Seriously, why?

I am confused about this anyway: Isn't Sodium Metasilicate a very strong Caustic?

I've used it to strip ten year old uncleaned paint brushes and it does the job. Leave 'em in too long and the natural bristles start breaking down. It is the principle ingredient in products like Simple Green. Supposedly it's more "eco friendly" than TSP. I am unsure if this is actually the case. The stuff is powerful strong.





This stuff was made for cleaning 401 stainless to near-laboratory cleanliness without any pitting/staining/etc.
I see. So unlike Sodium Hypochlorite (bleach), Sodium Metasilicate does not strip away the passive layer of Cromium Oxide (which is why SST is SST).

If that's the case then it is good to know. I have two SST fermenters I'm planning on using in a dual stage ferenter set up. Heretofore I've only I used glass. I have found that it is all too easy to destroy the passive layer on SST and obtain rust when using Sodium Hypochlorite.


You prollly already know: A great many restaurants run their own breweries. Check that out.

There's no reason you can't weld up a large process plant of your own and get Fed and state licence to make and sell micro brew to the local restaurants. Sumpin to look into if you really want to brew for a living.
"Larsen's Las Vagas Ale" it's got a catchy ring. Make mine hoppy please.

Eric Larsen
06-03-2009, 6:35 PM
Why? Seriously, why?

I am confused about this anyway: Isn't Sodium Metasilicate a very strong Caustic?


The old caustic typically used in breweries will eventually pit the interior surfaces of fermenters and piping and bright tanks. Then beer stone fills the pits. Bacteria grows in the beer stone.

No real health risk, just funky beer. There's a reason the glass-lined tanks of Old Latrobe were lined with glass in the first place. The ingredients in PBW are more gentle, and far better for the planet when poured down the drain. It works better as a bath (nothing better for removing lasagna from the pan), but is also effective as a wash. (Edit - And I personally can't stand working with the old caustic. Splash some in your eyes sometime (even wearing safety glasses, a high-pressure spray will get through). PBW on the other hand is a lot easier on my body, stainless steel, and our water supply. If it cost double, it would still be a bargain.)

As for getting a brewing job again, I'm just going to have to wait for one of the seven commercial brewers to retire/expire. Nevada's start-up paperwork and fees are nearly punitive. It's a real shame, because out of the seven, two really, really need me. But they'd rather sell mediocre (bad is more like it) beer than take a chance on a new brewer.