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Keith Outten
02-15-2009, 10:27 PM
I salvaged four of these servo motors from a Ultrasonic Testing "C" Scan machine months ago. Honestly I have no idea whether these could be used for a CNC machine or their value.

Possibly someone who builds their own CNC machines can offer some information or advice.

Angus Hines
02-16-2009, 12:04 AM
I found you some info here Keith. Scroll down to 'Platform 2600' and the 2630 in the drop down menu.

http://www.cmccontrols.com/servo_motors_downloads.asp

Keith Outten
02-16-2009, 8:18 AM
Thanks Angus,

It looks like these are 70 volt DC motors.
I wonder what the deal is with the optical encoders?
.

Ken Fitzgerald
02-16-2009, 10:19 AM
The optical encoders are just there for postional information.

Angus Hines
02-16-2009, 5:47 PM
Now that we know what they are, what are ya gonna do with them Keith?

Keith Outten
02-16-2009, 9:06 PM
Angus,

I don't have a clue. The truth is I'm not an electrical kind of guy....certainly not a Sparktrician so I don't have the knowledge to do anything with them. I also don't have the time. You wouldn't believe the stuff I salvaged from this rig and I mean some very expensive precision goodies like 12 foot long linear rails and bearings. Also a set of 7 foot long rails with bearings, then two shafts with motors and bearings, and two five gallon buckets of stainless steel fasteners....etc.

There are several bearing blocks and all kinds of aluminum pieces as well. I know what to do with the mechanical stuff :)
.

AL Ursich
02-17-2009, 3:10 PM
This is a picture of the cheaper version of a optical encoder and used with the CarveWright Servo System. Once zero is obtained as it bumps into a stop, it counts the pulses of this encoder to give feedback to the computer of the position and speed. You can see the sun showing the lines in the shadow.

The more expensive types like the Fanuc Robot use is a absolute encoder, the older ones use a binary code on a wheel and the newer ones are non contact magnetic. A absolute encoder does not need to home itself when powered on like a pulse encoder.

Nice pile of Salvage parts. :D I would have loved to have been still working at the San Diego Picture Tube plant when they scrapped all the production equipment. I had moved on to the Service Center in Philly fixing Play Stations and stuff.

AL