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Louis Brandt
01-04-2009, 10:31 AM
LCD TV question

We just bought our first flat screen LCD TV, but since we were only buying it for a bedroom, we selected a small, inexpensive 19 inch 720P Emerson. My question is this. I thought that the new flat screen, non-projection type LCD sets did not have the problem that you experience when you watch the TV from an off-center location. When I move a little to the left or right of this one, the color seems to fade. Is this just because we bought a cheap one, or do even expensive flat screen LCD sets do this?

Were thinking about buying a much more expensive 32 inch 1080P LCD TV for the den, but if wed have this same problem, we might want to reconsider.

Since this was our first flat screen purchase, please let me know what those of you who have them have experienced.

Louis

Karl Brogger
01-04-2009, 10:50 AM
When I move a little to the left or right of this one, the color seems to fade. Is this just because we bought a cheap one, or do even expensive flat screen LCD sets do this?

Part of it is a cheap one. TV's you really need to try before you buy, and you get what you pay for. I've been looking for a LCD tv for my bedroom. I've narrowed it down to LG, and Dell. Neither of which is real high end, but Consumer Reports rates them both well, and seeing both in a store the picture quality is pretty decent.

Matt Meiser
01-04-2009, 10:56 AM
Our new 46" Toshiba has excellent picture even close to 45 degrees off-axis. Like Karl said, you really need to look at them at the store before buying. This is one of the things I was checking out as we looked at them, in addition to the on-axis picture. You don't necessarily need to buy the most expensive one, but as price goes up you'll find you get more of the positive attributes.

Clifford Mescher
01-04-2009, 11:04 AM
We have a 46" LCD 1080P and it looks great from any angle.Clifford.

Bruce Page
01-04-2009, 12:05 PM
Our 46" Sony XBR looks good from ~ 45. Beyond that you start to loose definition like you would on any CRT screen.


Edit: I Was just watching the FB game and the acceptable viewing angle is much more than 45. Probably more like 80.

Ken Garlock
01-04-2009, 12:10 PM
Hi Louis.

I have been looking at a new TV to replace my 13 year old 52" Sony XBR. BTW, I have never had to have a service call on it. While I can't prove it, I think the good service is in part due to having had it professionally calibrated when it was new.

So here is my thoughts on a new TV. For just darn good reliability, you can't beat a SONY. Yes you pay for the quality, but consider it an investment. It is like the saying about tools, buy quality and spend your money once.

What is an alternative to a Sony? I would say either a Toshiba or Samsung. Toshiba makes a good product as does Samsung.

I have owned a 24" Samsung computer monitor for several years, and it is a top notch display. A second reason for considering a Samsung, at least for me, is that hey offer a DLP rear projection unit that uses LEDs instead of the color wheel and expensive lamp bulb. They claim that the LEDs will out last the life of the TV. I am prejudice toward the DLP technology since I am retired from Texas Instruments, the company that invented DLP.

If I were you, I would also give Toshiba a critical examination. They have a good reputation in the market place. We have a 32" conventional Toshiba, and it does a good job. The only thing I would change is the use of the IR remote control. You have to aim the control at the TV to get the TVs attention. Fortunately, that is not a problem in our house since we are Dish Network subscribers and use the RF Dish remotes.

So I am still on the fence between Sony and Samsung DLP. Decisions, decisions, I thought that was over when I retired....

Karl Brogger
01-04-2009, 12:46 PM
For rear projection, bar none, Mitsubishi is the way to go. I currently have an old 65", and am looking to upgrade to 73". Mostly because the one I have now does not do 1080p, and has no HDMI inputs.

Mitchell Andrus
01-04-2009, 1:00 PM
52" Sharp Aquos. Zero problems seeing from any angle. Great set. You do need to spend $ for performance.

Frank Hagan
01-04-2009, 1:18 PM
Some of the reviews will tell you how good the off-axis viewing is; you can check CNET.COM for "professional" reviews and the Display Devices forums at AVSFORUM.COM for consumer reviews (that last one is also a good place to find calibration settings for the various TVs).

We're shopping for a 52" TV to replace our 36" Toshiba CRT; the problem is that none of the flat screen TVs do as well on standard definition signals as a CRT. Sony and Samsung are said to be good with standard def (according to CNET.COM), but you really won't know how a TV does until you have it home, hooked up to your video source, and in your room. The cheaper brands just look horrible to me on standard def signals.

The other thing to take into consideration is that the 16:9 format of the flat panel TVs. If you have a 36" CRT TV now, you really need to bump up the size to about 46" to get the same height image from standard def video (unless you like the carnival Fun House effect of stretching the image to fit the screen).

We're looking at LCD sets only. Just based on my impressions at stores, the rear projection sets, DLP, and others all suffer from off-axis viewing issues. LCD and plasma sets don't suffer it as much, but some LCD sets have a matte finish on the screen for anti-glare that seems to make it worse. Plasma looks great, but it uses more juice, and electricity rates are expected to rise by about 1/3 to 1/2 over the next few years. And these things never turn off now; another thing to look at is the power consumption when they are "off".

Joe Pelonio
01-04-2009, 1:40 PM
Plasma looks great, but it uses more juice, and electricity rates are expected to rise by about 1/3 to 1/2 over the next few years. And these things never turn off now; another thing to look at is the power consumption when they are "off".
Just this morning there was an article in the paper about this. California wants to pass a law that would allow only the most energy efficient TVs, because LCD uses 40% more electricity than the old tube TVs, plasma uses 2-3 times as much.

Jim Becker
01-04-2009, 8:10 PM
Sharp Aquos (we have two of them) has very good off-angle viewing, especially our newer one.

Joel Goodman
01-04-2009, 8:22 PM
I would look at Plasma TVs. The off axis viewing is much better as are the blacks. They are a bit heavier if you plan to wall mount. I have a Panasonic and the picture is excellent. I think the hype about "burn in" is not a problem -- my friend has had a Pioneer for 4 or 5 years. Just don't leave it on if your not watching -- especially with a DVD or BluRay.


LCD TV question

We just bought our first flat screen LCD TV, but since we were only buying it for a bedroom, we selected a small, inexpensive 19 inch 720P Emerson. My question is this. I thought that the new flat screen, non-projection type LCD sets did not have the problem that you experience when you watch the TV from an off-center location. When I move a little to the left or right of this one, the color seems to fade. Is this just because we bought a cheap one, or do even expensive flat screen LCD sets do this?

We’re thinking about buying a much more expensive 32 inch 1080P LCD TV for the den, but if we’d have this same problem, we might want to reconsider.

Since this was our first flat screen purchase, please let me know what those of you who have them have experienced.

Louis

Sonny Edmonds
01-04-2009, 9:28 PM
46" Sharp Aquos in our main viewing area. Seems to be good for all viewers so far.
We just put a 40" in the master bedroom, Vizio with the 120 HZ refresh rate. The wife thinks the Vizio looks better than the Aquos does. I think they look the same.
We feed them both with HD and have HDDVR's on them.
Now that is something to write home about, those DVR's. Let's you fast forward through the darned commercials.
We have a 26" RCA LCD for the RV, but no HD there, just standard DirecTV satellite. It has a DVD player built into it. (Handy when you need two things going at once) TV up front, DVDs in the rear.
Hummm, kinda sounds like that liquor store with the poker parlor in the back room. Liquor in front, poker in the rear.

So far, no complaints about off center viewing here. That's with 3 different LCD's.

If you want a graphic example of waste of power, try walking along a bunch of Plasma TV's while on and put your hand on the top of them. Then try that with LCD TVs. Case closed.
Do you want a heater? Or a TV? :rolleyes:

Ultimately, it has to look right to you, and the wife (if applicable). And fit your budget. Only choose from sets you can view side by side.

Most places have a feed they run, so the whole wall gets the supposed same picture. But the settings may have been changed on some of the TV's while being fiddled with. :(

Mitchell Andrus
01-04-2009, 11:00 PM
If you want a graphic example of waste of power, try walking along a bunch of Plasma TV's while on and put your hand on the top of them. Then try that with LCD TVs. Case closed.
Do you want a heater? Or a TV? :rolleyes:

I agree. Plasmas run very hot. My old 42" heated the room in winter... and in the summer before the power supply gave out.

John Lohmann
01-06-2009, 10:27 PM
For a 32" TV, don't bother with 1080p, you won't really see much difference between it & 720p. I upgraded from a Vizio 42" 1080i to a Samsung 52" & the difference is unbelievable. Look around, everyone has their favorite brand.

Neal Clayton
01-06-2009, 11:17 PM
LCD TV question

We just bought our first flat screen LCD TV, but since we were only buying it for a bedroom, we selected a small, inexpensive 19 inch 720P Emerson. My question is this. I thought that the new flat screen, non-projection type LCD sets did not have the problem that you experience when you watch the TV from an off-center location. When I move a little to the left or right of this one, the color seems to fade. Is this just because we bought a cheap one, or do even expensive flat screen LCD sets do this?

Were thinking about buying a much more expensive 32 inch 1080P LCD TV for the den, but if wed have this same problem, we might want to reconsider.

Since this was our first flat screen purchase, please let me know what those of you who have them have experienced.

Louis

plasmas don't suffer from the viewing angle restrictions, since they work like a CRT. they do suffer more from glare, though, if you have windows nearby.

which you buy depends on the room and where you're gonna sit, imo. one might be a better solution than the other.

Tom Godley
01-07-2009, 12:19 AM
The LCD TV's seem to be taking over - The actual screens are only made by a few companies. As the technology to produce larger glass sheets improves the cost continues to drop and this puts price pressure on the other technologies.

LCD's are more energy efficient than Plasmas -- and when viewed straight on they have a comparable picture. I still like the bright picture and the better blacks that the Plasma have - but they can heat up a room. Depending on the room and final location many LCDs have poor side viewing when installed - IMO.

This is all somewhat subjective because some people do not notice the difference in the technologies.

I have the Sharp and Sony LCD units -- I have Sony Plasma units that are fantastic as well as a narrow Sony LCD projection unit that has a great picture and was a killer deal.

I had a large group up to a ski house over the New Year -- someone mentioned how nice the picture was on the TV. It was a Sony CRT TV about 7 years old - I hated to tell them it was old tech. The better CRT units were very good -- bad to lift or hang on the wall!

I think that you really have to go and look at them side by side - I have not heard any real difference in the repair history of the premium major players.