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Thread: Joinery saws

  1. #1
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    Joinery saws

    I was out looking for tools today and found an open-handled Jackson 12" backsaw. It really needs some love but it called to me and I couldn't turn it down for $9. However, I'm not sure I have a need for her. The teeth are completely shot and will have to be re-cut, so I have a blank slate to work with. I feel I have a full complement of joinery saws and I'm trying to figure out how to work this new Jackson in. I have the following sharp and ready to use in a rack over my bench:

    Dovetail saw: 9" Gramercy 18ppi rip
    Carcass: 10" Jackson 14ppi crosscut
    Sash: 14" Waller 10ppi rip, 13" 10ppi crosscut
    Tenon: 16" Tyzack, 10ppi rip

    The obvious solution, at least to me anyway, is to refile the 10" Jackson carcass saw into a larger dovetail saw, maybe like 15ppi rip and then re-tooth the new 12" Jackson into something like 12ppi crosscut and use it as a carcass saw.

    I was hoping someone might have some insight / advice. Thanks.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  2. #2
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    I wish I had your problem.

    Sounds like you may have found a solution. My thought would to be make the 12" into the cross cut carcass saw like you mention and see how it turns out before changing the other one. I have a long and a short crosscut back saw and they both have their place.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Jim,

    Yeah, I got pretty lucky with an absentee bid a year or so ago, so I've been set for larger English backsaws for a while. I love the Gramercy but it is a bit slow on any stock thicker than 1/2" or so, so the 10" Jackson would fill in nicely, with the new 12" Jackson taking up the slack. Of course, resto on the new saw is going to take a while so I have time to decide. Thanks!
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Zach Dillinger View Post
    :

    Sash: 14" Waller 10ppi rip, 13" 10ppi crosscut
    Hi Zach,

    Not answering your original question, but I'm interested in the "Waller" saw you mentioned, any chance of a picture, maybe a close up of the mark?

    I've been trying to resolve an inconsistency, the only "Waller & Co" listed in Don McConnell's "Handsaw Makers of Britain" is a London maker around 1780, but the example I'm trying
    to identify, is obviously much later, probably more like 1880, than 1780.

    Regards
    Ray

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Gardiner View Post
    Hi Zach,

    Not answering your original question, but I'm interested in the "Waller" saw you mentioned, any chance of a picture, maybe a close up of the mark?

    I've been trying to resolve an inconsistency, the only "Waller & Co" listed in Don McConnell's "Handsaw Makers of Britain" is a London maker around 1780, but the example I'm trying
    to identify, is obviously much later, probably more like 1880, than 1780.

    Regards
    Ray
    Ray,

    Photos of the Waller saw as requested. Brass back, obviously, and appears to be a beech handle. The saw nuts are pretty munged up, but they are split nuts. The only real problem with the saw is the crack in the lambs tongue.

    Waller split nut small.jpgWaller handle small.jpgWaller logo small.jpgWaller overall small.jpg

    Last edited by Zach Dillinger; 01-28-2011 at 9:09 PM.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  6. #6
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    shouldnt be hard to make a new handle for that one thats what I would do if it were mine do. im not sure if thats what you want to do.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Culver View Post
    shouldnt be hard to make a new handle for that one thats what I would do if it were mine do. im not sure if thats what you want to do.
    I've thought about it, but I'm happy to keep it original for now. The crack doesn't impact use and, to be honest, when I need a rip backsaw I tend to use my big tenon saw rather than this one.
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

  8. #8
    Hi Zach,

    Thanks for posting those pictures, with your permission, I would like to re-post them in a thread here I think it will help to narrow the search for more information on the maker, The handle has been modified at some point in it's life, the front of the cheeks look like they have been cut down, maybe for some special purpose perhaps.

    Just going on the general appearance, I don't think it's 1780's as listed in HSMOB, it is however of the style that you would expect to find in the early 1800's, so that would make it around 200 years old.

    Now, I can answer your original question, put this one aside, and look out for another sash tenon

    Thanks again for the pictures.

    Regards
    Ray

  9. #9
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    Ray,

    Post 'em anywhere you want. I hope it helps. I guess I'm going to have to make that new Jackson saw into a sash saw and put this one up or pass it on to a collector who can appreciate it.

    Thanks,

    Zach
    Your endgrain is like your bellybutton. Yes, I know you have it. No, I don't want to see it.

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