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Thread: Titebond vs Elmers

  1. #1

    Titebond vs Elmers

    I have always used Elmers wood glue and have never had a problem, but everything I have been reading lately says Titebond is the way to go. Does anyone know what the difference is between the two. Is it worth the extra $4-5 for the Titebond.

  2. This is just my opinion. I used to use elmer's also until I tried titebond. To be honest, when I used elmer's I never had faith in the glue bond on its own without any mechanical fasteners. When I tried titebond the first time, I couldn't believe how strong the bond was. I must admit that, back when I used elmer's, my knowledge of woodworking and techniques such as gluing up wasnt nearly what it is now so part of it could have been my inexperience. However, I strongly believe there is a difference and titebond is worth the extra $4 or so.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    International Falls, MN
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    158
    I certainly been known to use both in certain instances.

    I think TB is the better of the 2 but the application would dictate whether that is always needed in my view. For a few bucks I always go with the TB - but someplaces can charge such a premium for it I pass too.

    I have never experienced a failure from either that was not my fault anyway. Once I squeezed the clamps to death and likely forced out 80% of the TB and things literally fell apart in time. Thought it may happen too.

    Drawback to Elmers - I think it has to be 90% dry/cured to be close to strength and TB less so. So if it's a glue and use in 30 minutes or so I'm always using TB

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
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    Glue is usually the cheapest part of any project that I can think of, why cheap out? I bought a bottle off Elmers in a pinch a while back, and the very next chance I had I bought two of Titebond 3 to replace it. I don't like Elmers consistancy, or initial tack. I suppose it is usable if needed, but why?
    Last edited by Steve Rozmiarek; 03-23-2009 at 10:59 AM.

  5. #5
    One more vote for Titebond.

    Elmers is for school

  6. #6
    TBII or III for me. Great brand; long history of use; lots of positive testimonial; cheapest part of project; no need to switch...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Cave Creek, AZ - near Phoenix
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    1,261
    My experience is the shelf life for Titebond is noticably longer than Elmer's. I switched to Titebond years ago after tossing more than one container of "aged" Elmer's. I have used Elmer's Probond for outdoor applications, and it works very well. Given the choice, I'll buy one of the Titebond products today. I have no idea what they cost.
    Dave Falkenstein aka Daviddubya
    Cave Creek, AZ

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    I like titebond. It is thinner and less viscous than elmers. This makes it easier to spread and apply, that means more coverage and stronger joints.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Don't get Titebond II or III on your clothes, it does not wash out. I've never had a problem with using Elmers glue with a joint failure. Joint failure due to glue squeeze out is mostly myth. Thin glue layers work best and failure was most like due to too little glue being applied in the first place to cover the glued area or a poor fitting joint.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USN(Ret)

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  10. #10
    I have elmer's probond and it seemed the exact same as original titebond.

    However, if I had a choice between elmers white school glue and titebond original, I would pay the $5 extra for titebond.

    Elmer's white glue is intended more for construction paper and dried macaroni.

  11. #11
    Nowadays, I use TB3 for everything. Lower working temp (I keep my shop pretty cool), indoors, outdoors - it's all good.

    And yeah - don't get it on your clothes. Or shoes.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
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    According to a lecture given by Marc Adams, all PVA glues are the same minus a few "special ingredients". The type II and type III glues are an attempt to make them more water proof, but the only difference between typical white and yellow glue is one ingredient added to make the yellow glue stick better to wet construction grade lumber. Again, according to him, good old Elmer's white glue (not water soluble school glue) is just as good as any yellow "wood glue". The big advantages for me is that the white glue has a longer open time, cleans us easier, and dries clear.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Benson View Post
    According to a lecture given by Marc Adams, all PVA glues are the same minus a few "special ingredients". The type II and type III glues are an attempt to make them more water proof, but the only difference between typical white and yellow glue is one ingredient added to make the yellow glue stick better to wet construction grade lumber. Again, according to him, good old Elmer's white glue (not water soluble school glue) is just as good as any yellow "wood glue". The big advantages for me is that the white glue has a longer open time, cleans us easier, and dries clear.

    Yep, I agree. I visited a shop of some very well known cabinet makers a couple of years ago and was surprised to learn they only use white glue on everything they build. These guys do very high end work and their work is found in some of the most prominent collections in the country including the white house, colonial williamsburg and the capitol building not to mention countless private collections. Their period reproductions are the best Ive seen so I figure if its good enough for them its good enough for me. That being said Im sure someone will tell me these folks are wrong and that they know better and to that I will just say hogwash!!
    If at first you don't succeed, look in the trash for the instructions.





  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Niagara, Ontario
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    657
    I'm a relative noob so I never even considered, what I thought would be, the minute differences among wood glues would warrant an in depth research so I just used whatever came in handy and was $1 cheaper than the other brand.

    I just finished a bottle of Elmer's glue I bough at least 15 years ago. The bottle had been open and I used about 1/3 of the content for a pretty clumsy project I did then - a fairly large chest that stood in my garage until I knocked it down a few months ago. I used a hammer to break it down and it turned out most of the glue joints still held so well, I broke the joints next to the glue lines.

    A major project I used the old glue for were some rail and stile doors last Summer. They seem to be holding very well. The only problem was that the glue was setting very fast.

    Only recently I bought TB III which seems to be suggested by most to be the one suitable for walnut due to the darker color of the glue, but I also bought another bottle of Elmer's. Just in case

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Southern Minnesota
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    1,442
    I have used elmers yellow, elmers pro bond, titebond I, III, and gorilla WOOD glue. My favorites are the gorilla wood glue and the elmers pro bond, because they set up very quickly. Of those too I like the gorilla the best because it dries clear and is water resistant. I use tite bond III ocassionally if I need something with longer open times and the darker drying color. The thickness of the elmers and gorilla is a real nice feature because they do not run as easy. Strenght wise I think all of them are equal, except you can work on the wood sooner when using the pro bond and gorilla.

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