Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Something to ponder, over the weekend..

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,501

    Something to ponder, over the weekend..

    Not about sharpening, nor about whether to "hook" or not to Hook, or even Captain Hook

    During the latest project, I had a chance to use both the iron bodied planes, and a wooden bodied plane...

    The iron bottomed ones, merely roll the shaving up, like a roll of Moxxon TP.....then I have to clear them out of the plane

    The Wooden body ( Stanley #31, Ohio #81) shoot the shaving straight up into the air, where it then descends forward and tries to wrap around my left wrist

    Some sort of "Design Feature" going on here?

    Think about it...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Not about sharpening, nor about whether to "hook" or not to Hook, or even Captain Hook

    During the latest project, I had a chance to use both the iron bodied planes, and a wooden bodied plane...

    The iron bottomed ones, merely roll the shaving up, like a roll of Moxxon TP.....then I have to clear them out of the plane

    The Wooden body ( Stanley #31, Ohio #81) shoot the shaving straight up into the air, where it then descends forward and tries to wrap around my left wrist

    Some sort of "Design Feature" going on here?

    Think about it...
    You can get shavings to shoot straight out of an iron-bodied plane easily enough. Just move that cap iron on up towards the edge. IIRC you use 1/32"-1/16" of setback or something like that. Try it at more like 1/128" and see what happens.

    With that said, woodies do have tighter throats that "guide" the shaving up as you describe. On the minus side they're a bit harder to clear when they clog.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    16,559
    The set back of the cap iron and the shaving thickness controls how the shaving curls or shoots up straight. There are a few other factors that can also have an effect.

    Yesterday was spent planing a bunch of pieces with a #6. With a straight run down the edge the shavings would shoot out straight. A bit of skew would make them curl. The chip breaker was set back a bit for medium shavings. Light shavings would tend to come straight out, a bit heavier cut would tend to curl.

    Maybe today my camera will come out to the shop.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,501
    I tend to keep the set back the same on all the planes.....

    How many times, say while jointing the edge of a board, does the shaving come up, fall forward, and wrap around the wrist out by the front of a plane? The #7 and the #0-7 just make tight rolls.....same set up on the chipbreakers. I usually set mine about...1mm from the edge. The wedge on the #81 MAY curl things a bit, still acts like there is a wood magnet in my left wrist.....

    Just something to ponder....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Yesterday was spent planing a bunch of pieces with a #6. With a straight run down the edge the shavings would shoot out straight. A bit of skew would make them curl. The chip breaker was set back a bit for medium shavings.
    Out of curiosity what do you consider to be "back a bit"?

    It sounds like you were using the #6 as a short jointer, so for that sort of use I might consider 1/64" to be a backed-off set, and 1/128" or so to be tight. Obviously the numbers are higher for roughing and lower for smoothing. Are we remotely in the same ballpark?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    16,559
    By eye it looked to be about 1/32" give or take. This was to remove saw marks and the mill's planer skips. Shavings were not measured but were in about the 0.007-0.010" range.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,501
    Couldn't get them long shavings, today....board was in the "mood"
    IMG_2880 (640x480).jpg
    Tried out the #7
    IMG_2877 (640x480).jpg
    Then the #81.
    .IMG_2879 (640x480).jpg
    Had to clean the bench off, first...
    IMG_2875 (640x480).jpg
    Was a bit crowded. Need to bring the last plank down here, trim it to length, and joint it as well...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    By eye it looked to be about 1/32" give or take. This was to remove saw marks and the mill's planer skips. Shavings were not measured but were in about the 0.007-0.010" range.
    Ah, OK, that's a heavier shaving than I assumed.

    My rule of thumb these days is that a "relaxed but still beneficial" set (i.e. one that limits tearout but doesn't prevent it in difficult wood) is about 4X the shaving thickness, which would indeed be 1/32" in the instance you cite. I would go to about half that in difficult wood. This is all very rough since there are a LOT of other variables in play, such as the angle of the cap iron face and the properties of the wood.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    16,559
    It is a Stanley/Bailey plane with a standard chip breaker.

    Here it is at work today:

    In To the Claw.jpg

    There are a dozen piece being worked. With the bench top claw it is faster than even a quick release vise to flip the piece an plane both edges and then load the next piece.

    Most folks have heard about bird's eye maple. How about bird's eye pine?

    Bird's Eye Pine?.jpg

    Every once in a while a piece like this will pop up in the stacks of lumber. It actually looks pretty stunning when finished.

    Here is a shot of face planing against a stop:

    Apron Stop.jpg

    To me this is just one reason to have at least a bit of an apron on a bench.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    4,722
    I adjust for translucent shavings that curl.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    5,501
    Talking about Jointer planes.....Translucent shavings are meaningless and a waste of my time. I look for a shaving that goes the length of the board, and the full width of the board's edge....once I get one of those shavings...I am done, and moving on to the next step

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •