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Thread: Saw dust&epoxy to fill riser/tread gap?

  1. #1

    Saw dust&epoxy to fill riser/tread gap?

    Edit: iPhone auto corrected epoxy to melody... sorry!
    Wood putty is in there now.
    if I were to remove the putty, what would y'all recommend for filling this gap?
    I was thinking sanding dust + epoxy?

    Treads and risers are white oak with monocoat natural finish.
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    Last edited by mike waters; 09-13-2017 at 11:37 AM.

  2. #2
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    I fixed the title for you.

    The sawdust and epoxy will likely look better than plain putty, but you'll still be faced with the potential of gaps over time just because of wood movement (seasonal and from stair use)...I know this because we're living it on our back stairs in the 250 year old portion of our home. (the stairs are not that old, but...)
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    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Hey thank you!

    So what would you recommend me doing this situation ?

  4. #4
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    Make sure the stairways is properly supported to minimize movement before you make your fix... That's something on my "honey do list" for once I retire very shortly now.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Gotcha
    well, I believe they are supported fairly well.
    i was going to take my nail gun and shoot a few more nails into the stringers for reassurance though.

    once I do that, what sort of filler would you recommend?
    Maybe try a couple different ones on different stairs?
    My main concern is longevity

  6. #6
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    I would be disinclined to fill. It will appear filled. Unless they were expected to be painted - and you've indicated they are clear coated.

    Assuming the stairs are built using the a traditional mortise and wedged stringers, and you have access from under the stringer, can you drive the wedges further under the tread? Alternatively (and with some risk) pilot through the bottom of the tread up into the riser, and use wood screws to close the gap? The risk is that the tread is solid wood and will want to expand and contract ... though an 8 inch tread width is not going to cause a lot of movement.
    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius

  7. #7
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    Mike, another option is to use a trim molding like that often used in kitchen cabinet installs.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    Mike, another option is to use a trim molding like that often used in kitchen cabinet installs.
    I agree, and will likely have to do that with our back stairs, even after I stabilize them. Someone working for the previous owner did use filler and it didn't have "the look" that anyone would find pleasant. So I'll likely be pre-finishing some quarter round to "match" and using that to close things up. So there's a consistent look, it will have to go on every tread/riser, even though the problem only exists on the bottom three steps in my situation. Thanks for bringing this up!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    Hi again everyone,
    I believe I have a found a grand solution. After researching whether or not I wanted to create new face frames or deface my kitchen cabinets, a user suggested shop sawn (real wood) veneer for my cabinets.so o was thinking today, why not glue on shop sawn veneer to the riser? Yes, there may indeed be some very minor gappage. But nothing like I currently face.

    i think this will take the Rubio monocoat 2c oil the same as the solid wood has accepted it since it only penetrates so far into the wood

    i am going to get the shop sawn white oak veneer and sketch it in between both treads.
    I will fill the gapes between skirtboard and riser/tread with flexible caulk and paint it same color as skirt board.
    As as for the side are concerned.. I was considering just edgebanding them?
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    Last edited by mike waters; 09-19-2017 at 12:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    Sawing thin strips of the same material and sliding into the crack with some glue is a great idea. I have even been known to do it on face frames when a shoulder doesn't seat as well as intended. The result is an invisible repair ... though arguably it is easier to sand the face frame flush after the fix.
    "the mechanic that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools. Confucius

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